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L I B R I S 


E X 


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C OMPILED IN 1935 


by JACK STEELE • Editor-in-Chief 
FRANK S. BOYCE • Business Manager 


AS THE END OF A COLLEGE CAREER 


APPROACHES THERE COMES THE REALIZA- 
TION, WHICH WILL GROW STRONGER 
AS TIME ADVANCES, THAT THE FOUR 
YEARS SPENT AT MIDDLEBURY ARE 
AMONG THE MOST ENJOYABLE AND 
FORMATIVE WHICH LIFE HOLDS. 

TO PORTRAY INTERESTINGLY AND ACCU- 
RATELY ONE OF THESE YEARS SO THAT 
ITS RECORD MAY BE ENJOYED IN THE 
PRESENT AND CHERISHED IN THE FUTURE 
IS THE PURPOSE OF THE FORTIETH 
VOLUME OF THE 


Ka / eiJi 


e / d oAco ne 


( llhclcl /eb utl/ Co lie 


The Baccalaureate Service 
in Mead Chapel marks the last 
meeting of the members of each 
class as undergraduates. The 
Chapel, dominating the view 
from every part of the campus 
and drawing together the stu- 
dent body jor daily services, is 


the bond uniting the college. 




r 






This panorama of lower campus outlined against the enduring 
range of the Green Mountains is seen daily from Chapel Hill. The 
severe and subdued colonial architecture of the buildings blends har- 


moniously with the rugged contours of the mountain environs. 'The 
strength of the hills is His also/' 




STARR LIBRARY 

In Starr Library is centered that part of the cultural life of 
the college that deals with the literature and art of many coun- 
tries. Here students spend many hours, sometimes in search of 
prescribed knowledge and more often finding new fields of 
interest in the works of numerous authors. 


WARNER SCIENCE HALL 

A wide variety of subjects are covered and a number of 
countries brought to Vermont within the walls of Warner Science 
Hall. Students with interests in the natural sciences are 
always to be found here entering new realms of investigation. 





CHEMISTRY BUILDING 

The Chemistry Building, standing in complement to Warner 
Science Hall, completes the scientific unit of the college. In 
the several laboratories of the building many hours are spent 
in routine experimentation and research in particular branches 
of the science. 

MCCULLOUGH GYMNASIUM 
Notable both for sports and social activities, McCullough 
Gymnasium stands as an important unit in the life of the college. 
Among the events that take place here are those extra-curricu- 
lar activities that form many pleasant memories. 




GORGE 

Detail 


A 


THE 









LAKE PLEIAD 

Led by the clear, cold water of mountain springs and 
cupped in a wooded hollow near the top of the second 
range. Lake Pleiad is the most familiar objective of college 
hikers. 


CLEARING NEAR BREAD LOAF 


Grassy clearings, appearing suddenly amid the uniform- 
ity of the woodland expanse, add variety to the dark 
forest. 





KIPrON GORGE 


Bread Loaf road follows the course of the Middlebury 
River, favorite haunt of college anglers. The stream rushes 
down from the hills winding tortuously around the spurs of 
the divide. 


BREAD LOAF MOUNTAIN 

Rising clear-cut on the horizon, Bread Loaf is the most 
familiar and long remembered peak on the mountain 
campus. 





. 


■ 


Varying contrasts of light and shade add impressiveness to 
the panorama of upper campus as seen from Chipman Hill. Stately 
buildings and white spires stand out against the deep shadow of 
the woods and the fading grayness of Vermont fields. 




The rugged beauty of 
Old Chapel recalls the cherished 
colonial heritage of Middlebury. 
With its quaint exterior stairs, vine- 
covered walls and austere architec- 
tural lines, it embodies the dreams 
of the founders of the college and 
expresses their ideals of simplicity, 
dignity, and frugality. The aspira- 
tion symbolized by its impressive 
tower has been used as the theme 
for these pages. 



Th 


e President and Fel- 


lows. . . .The Faculty. 


A II >1 I \ I N T It A T I O \ 





PAUL DWIGHT MOODY 


President of the College 






>7 



PAUL D. MOODY, D.D., LL.D. 


President of the College. 

Middlebury. 

REDFIELD PROCTOR, M.S., LL.D. 

President of the Corporation, 
Vice-President, Vermont Marble Company. 

Proctor. 


ALLEN H. NELSON, A.B., M.A. 

Treasurer of the Corporation , 
Vice-President, Macmillan Company. 

New York, N. Y. 

JAMES L. BARTON, D.D., LL.D. 

Secretary Emeritus, American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions. 

Brookline, Mass. 


JAMES M. GIFFORD, LL.D. 

Lawyer, Merrill, Rogers, Gifford & Woody. 

New York , N. Y. 

JOHN E. WEEKS, A.M., LL.D. 

Ex-Governor of Vermont. 

Middlebury. 


FRANK C. PARTRIDGE, LL.D. 

President, Vermont Marble Company. 

Proctor. 


BERT L. STAFFORD, A.B. 

Lawyer, Lau rence, Stafford & O'Brien. 

Rutland. 

* 

SANFORD H. LANE, A.B. 

American Bank Note Company . 

New York, N. Y. 

PERCIVAL WILDS, A.B., LL.B. 

Lawyer, Chamberlin, Kafer, Wilds d Jube. 

New York, N. Y. 

hall p. McCullough, a.b., ll.b. 

Lawyer, Davis, Polk, Ward well, Gardiner d Reed. 

New York , N. Y. 

ALBERT H. WIGGIN, LL.D. 

Chairman, Governing Board, Chase National Bank. 

New York, N. Y. 


SAMUEL B. BOTSFORD, A.B., LL.B. 

General Manager, 

Buffalo Chamber of Commerce. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

ELBERT S. BRIGHAM, B.S., M.S. 

Chairman, Committee on Finance, 
National Life Insurance Company. 

Montpelier. 


FRANK L. BELL 


Lawyer. 
Crown Point, N. Y. 


ALBERT D. MEAD, A.M., PH.D., SC.D. 

Vice-President, Brown University. 

Providence, R. 1. 

CHARLES A. MUNROE, A.B. 

Lawyer. 
Chicago, 111. 

CARL A. MEAD, A.B., LL.B. 

Lawyer, Shearman & Sterling. 

New York, N. Y. 

HOMER L. SKEELS, B.S. 

President, Montpelier & Wells River Railroad. 

Montpelier. 

J. EARLE PARKER, B.S., LL.B., LL.M. 

Treasurer, Acadia Mills. 

Boston, Mass. 

ELLSWORTH C. LAWRENCE, B.S. 

Justice, Supreme Court, New York. 

Malone, N. Y. 


SAMUEL B. PETTINGILL, A.B., LL.B. 

Congressman, Third District of Indiana. 

South Bend, Ind. 


J. J. FRITZ, B.S. 

Business Manager and 
Secretary of the Corporation. 

Middlebury. 


I» R E S I II K N T 

A N II F F I. I. O W S 


>9 




BURT A. HAZELTINE 
Dean of the Mew’s College 
Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Tufts College (1913); A.M., 

Columbia University (1931); Instructor 
Mathematics, Middlcbury College (1924- 
1925); Assistant Professor (1925-1926); 
Professor (1926- ); Associate Dean, 

Men’s College (1925-1926); Dean (1926- 

). ATA. 


EDGAR J. WILEY 

Director of Admissions and Personnel 

B.S., Middlcbury College (1913); Ed.M., 
Harvard University (1921); Assistant 
Dean, Middlcbury College (1913-1918); 
Dean (1918-1927); Director of Admis- 
sions and Personnel (1927- ). A 24 \ 

K$K, TAK. 


ELEANOR S. ROSS 

Dean of the Women's College 

A. B., Middlcbury College (1895); A.M. 

(1927); Assistant Professor English, Mid- 
dlebury College (1915-1916); Dean of 
Women (1915- ). KKI\ ‘fcBK. 

F A C 1 ' I. T V 

• 

CHARLES A. ADAMS 

Professor of Education 

B. S., Middlebury College (1895); M.A. 

(1897); Professor Education, Middlebury 
College (1923- ). 


FRANCES H. WARNER 
Director of Admissions for Women 

A.B., Middlebury College (1905); 
Director of Admissions for Women and 
Alumnae Secretary-Treasurer (1930- ). 


CHAUNCY C. ADAMS 

Lecturer in Bible 

A.B., Dartmouth (1896); D.D., Dart- 
mouth (1932); Lecturer in Bible, Mid- 
dlebury College (1931- ). KKK. 



20 









RAYMOND L. BARNEY 
Professor of Biology 

B.S., Rhode Island State College (1915); 
Sc.M., Brown University (1916); Ph.D. 
(1925); Assistant Professor Biology, Mid- 
dlebury College (1924-1925); Associate 
Professor (1925-1926); Professor (1926- 

). 22. 


DOUGLAS S. BEERS 

Professor of English 

A.B., Yale University (1919); A.M. 
(1921); Ph.D. (1925); Professor English, 
Middlebury College (1923- ). 


BENJAMIN H. BECK 

Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., University of Nebraska (1916); 
Professor Physical Education, Football 
Coach, Middlebury College (1928- ). 

Acacia. 


F A C 1 I. T V 


JOHN G. BOWKER 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Tufts College (1924); Ed.M., 
Harvard (1930); Instructor Mathematics, 
Middlebury College (1926-1928); Assist- 
ant Professor (1928- ). 


LEA BINAND 
Assistant Professor of Trench 

Brevet Superieur; Assistant Professor 
French, Middlebury College (1929- ). 


MARY N. BOVC'LES 
Instructor in Home Economics 
Assistant Dietitian 

A.B., Middlebury College (1917); A.M., 
Columbia University (1924); Instructor 
Home Economics, Assistant Dietitian, Mid- 
dlebury College (1924- ). 



2 1 




ARTHUR M. BROWN 
Professor of Physical Education 
Director of Athletics 

A.B., Williams College (1907); Profes- 
sor Physical Education, Director of Ath- 
letics, Middlebury College (1918- ). 

Gargoyle. 


ERNEST C. BRYANT 

Baldwin Professor of Physics 

B.S., Middlebury College (1891); S.B., 
M. I. T. (1893); Sc.D., Middlebury Col- 
lege (1925); Professor Physics and Mathe- 
matics, Middlebury College (1895-1912); 
Professor Physics, Middlebury College 
(1912- ). X'P, 4 >BK. 


RICHARD L. BROWN 

Instructor in English 

A.B., Bowdoin College (1929); M.A., 
Harvard University (1930); Instructor 
English, Middlebury College (1931- ). 

AT. 




F A C r I. T Y 




FRANK W. CADY 
Professor of English 

A.B., Middlebury College (1890); A.M. 
(1903); B. Litt., Oxford University 
(1908); Assistant Professor English, Mid- 
dlebury College (1909-1917); Professor 
(1917- ). AT, <PBK. 


WILLIAM S. BURRAGE 
Professor of Greek Language and Litera- 
ture 

A.B., Harvard University (1892); A.M. 
(1894); Ph.D. (1898); Professor Greek 
Language and Literature, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1903- ). $BK. 


JUAN A. CENTENO 

Professor of Spanish 

A.B., Madrid (1920); M.D. (1927); 
Instructor Spanish, Middlebury College 
( 1929-193 1); Associate Professor (1931- 
*933 ); Professor (1933- ); Dean of 

Spanish School (1932-1933). 2 AI 1 . 



22 








REGINALD L. COOK 
Professor of American Literature 

A.B., Middlebury College (1924); M.A. 
(1926); B.A., Oxon. (1929); Instructor 
English and American Literature, Middle- 
bury College (1929-1931); Associate Pro- 
fessor American Literature (1931 -193 2); 
Professor (1932- ). KAP. 


ALFRED M. DAME 
Professor of Latin 

A.B., Harvard University (1902); A.M. 
(1903); Professor Latin, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1928- ). 3 *BK. 


ELLSWORTH B. CORNWALL 
Professor of Political Science 

A. B., Princeton University (1905); 

LL.B., New York University (1907); Pro- 
fessor Political Science, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1928- ). 

• 

F A C I LTV 

HARRY M. FIFE 
Professor of Economics 

B. A., McGill University (1921); M.A., 

Harvard University (1922); Associate 
Professor Economics, Middlebury College 
(1925-1926); Professor (1926- ). 


J. PERLEY DAVISON 
Associate Professor of History 

A.B., Tufts College (19*9); A.M. 
(1920); Assistant Professor History, Mid- 
dlcbury College (1923-1931); Associate 
Professor ( 1 9 3 1 - )• 


PRUDENCE H. FISH 
Assistant Professor of Music 

Mus.B., Oberlin College (1923); In- 
structor Music, Middlebury College (1925- 
19^3); Assistant Professor (1933- ). 

UK A, AOT. 






23 



STEPHEN A. FREEMAN 

Professor of French 

A.B., Harvard University (1920); M.A. 
( 19a 1 ) ; Ph.D. (1923); Professor French, 
Middlebury College (1925- ), Dean of 

the French School (1925- ). Trident 

Club. 


V. SPENCER GOODREDS 
Associate Professor of Drama and Public 
Speaking 

A.B., University of Buffalo; Associate 
Professor Drama and Public Speaking, 
Middlebury College (1928- ). AX. 


IDA V. GIBSON 

Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., Skidmore College (1919); M.A., 
Columbia University (1925); Instructor 
Flomc Economics, Middlebury College 
(* 933 - )• 

• 

F A C 1 I. T Y 


VERNON C. HARRINGTON 

Board man Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Middlebury College (1891); 
L.H.D., University of Wooster (1908); 
Assistant Professor English, Middlebury 
College (1913-1916); Professor (1916- 
i9*7); Boardman Professor Philosophv 
(1917. ). TKA, 4 >BK. 


JOHN F. HALLER 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Chem. B., Cornell University (1922); 
Instructor Chemistry, Middlebury College 
(1923-1927); Assistant Professor (1927- 
). Al Djcbar. 


LEWIS J. HATHAWAY 

Professor of Music 

Mus.B., New England Conservatory of 
Music; Assistant Professor Music, Middle- 
bury College (1916-1918), Professor 
(1918- ). 



2 4 






WALDO H. HEINRICHS 
Instructor in Sociology 

B.S., Denison College (1913); M.A., 

Columbia University (1924); Instructor 
Sociology, Middleburv College (1934- 

). Ben. 


ALLEN M. KLINE 

Proctor Professor of American History 
A.B., University of Michigan (1904); 
A.M. (190s); Ph.D. (1907); Proctor 
Professor American History, Middlcbury 
College (1920- ). TKA. 


FRANK E. HOWARD 
Professor of Education and Psychology 

A.B., Ypsilanti College (1907); A.M., 
Clark University (1910); Ph.D. (1912). 
Professor of Education and Psychology, 
Middleburv College (1915- ), K‘I»K 

<I>K<t\ 


f a c: 1; t v 


W. STORRS LEE 
Instructor in English 
College Editor 

A.B., Middlebury College (1929); Ox- 
ford University (1929-1930); Instructor 
English and College Editor, Middlebury 
College (1930- ). AT, TIAE, K<i>K. 


CLARA B. KNAPP 
Professor of Home Economics 

A.B., Syracuse University; M.A., Syra- 
cuse University; Professor Home Eco- 
nomics, Middlebury College (1922- ). 

4>BK. 


SAMUEL E. LONGWELL 
Burr Professor of Biology 

A.B., Bates College (1902); Ph.D., 
Brown University (1918); Burr Professor 
Biology, Middlcbury College (1919- ). 

V T 



*5 






ROSE E. MARTIN LAILA A. MCNEIL 

Assistant Professor of Spanish Librarian 

A.B., New York State Teacher’s College A.B., Wellesley College (1901); Libra- 

(1916); A.M., Middlebury College rian, Middlebury College (1913- )• 

(1929); Assistant Professor Spanish, Mid- 
dlebury College (1929- )• 

WILLIAM W. MCGILTON 

Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

A.B., Wesleyan University (1881); 

A.M. (1884); Sc.D., Middlebury College 
(1921); Professor Physics, Chemistry and 
Astronomy, Middlebury College (1892- 
1894); Professor Chemistry (1894-1919); 

Professor Emeritus (1919- ). 

<J>BK. 

F A C 1 I. T Y 


• 

WERNER NEUSE 

Associate Professor of German 

University of Berlin (1918-1923); 
Ph.D., University of Giessen (i 93 °)> 
Studienreferendar and Studienassessor, Ber- 
lin (1923-1927); Associate Professor Ger- 
man, Middlebury College (i 93 2 “ )• 


W. GRAFTON NEALLEY 
Assistant Professor of Political Science 

A.B., University of Maine (1929); 
A.M., Stanford University (1930); in- 
structor Political Science, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1931-1934); Assistant Professor 
0934 - )• *MA,nZA. 


H. GODDARD OWEN 
Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Middlebury College (1923); 
A.M., New York University (1924); As- 
sistant Professor English, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1926-1929); Associate Professor 
1929- ); Assistant Dean, Breadloaf 

School of English (1929-1934); Dean 

(1934- )• AKE > * BK - 



26 





LLEWELLYN R. PERKINS 

Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Tufts College (1898); H.B. 
(1902); A.M. (1912); Professor Mathe- 
matics, Middlebury College (1913- ). 


JAMES S. PRENTICE 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Queens University (1920); A.M. 
(1927); Assistant Professor Economics, 
Middlebury College (1931- ). 


PERLEY C. PERKINS 
Assistant Professor of English 

A. B., University of New Hampshire 

(1922); M.A. (1923); Instructor English, 
Middlebury College (1923-1925); Assis- 
tant Professor (1925- ). 

• 

F A « U I. T V 

• 

MARY S. ROSEVEAR 
Instructor of Physical Education 

B. S., Syracuse University (1920); In- 

structor Physical Education, Middlebury 
College (19-4- )• 


ALBERT RANTY 
Associate Professor of French 

B.A., Columbia University (1924); 
M.A., Middlebury College (1929); In- 
structor French, Middlebury College 
(1925-1928); Assistant Professor (1928- 
1929); Associate Professor (1929- ). 


PAUL RUSBY 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Columbia University (1920); 
A.M. (1922); Assistant Professor Eco- 
nomics, Middlebury College (1930- ). 

<i>kt, uni. 



2 7 





BRUNO M. SCHMIDT 
Associate Professor of Geology 

B.A., Williams College (1922); M.A., 
Yale University (1925); Instructor Geol- 
ogy, Middlebury College (1925-1929); 
Associate Professor (1929- ). B'P. 


EVERETT SKILLINGS 

Professor of German 

A.B., Bates College (1897); A.M. 
(1917); Assistant Professor German, Mid- 
dlebury College (1909-1913); Professor 
(1913- ). 4 >BK. 


RUSSELL G. SHOLES 

Associate Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Washington University (1922); 
A.M. (1923); Associate Professor Sociol- 
ogy, Middlebury College (1927- ). 

ex, nrM. 


F A C V L T V 


• 

EMILE V. TELLE 
Assistant Professor of French 

Baccalaureat, Universite de Toulouse 
(1923); M.A., Ohio State University 

(1931); Assistant Professor French, Mid- 
dlebury College (1934- ). 


PHELPS N. SWETT 

Professor of Geography and Graphics 

B.S., M. I. T. (1907); M.A., Clark 
University (1925); Professor of Geogra- 
phy and Graphics, Middlebury College 
(1909- ). ‘PTA. 


JOSEPH A. THOMAS 
Instructor of Chemistry 

B.S., Bowdoin (1926); M.S., Middlebury 
(1928); Ph.D., Harvard (1934); Instruc- 
tor Chemistry Middlebury Summer Ses- 
sion (1927-1930); Instructor Chemistry 
Middlebury College (193 4- ). 



28 




PERLEY C. VOTER 

Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Bowdoin College (1909); A.M., 
Harvard University (1911); Instructor 
Chemistry, Middlebury College (1912- 
1913); Assistant Professor (1913-1919); 
Professor (1919- )• AT, Aa 2 . 


ELLEN E. WILEY 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., St. Lawrence University (1907); 
Instructor Mathematics, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1923-1926); Assistant Professor 
(1926-1928); Associate Professor (1928- 
). AAA. 


RAYMOND H. WHITE 

Professor of Latin 

A.B., Yale University (1905); A.M. 
(1906); Professor Latin, Middlebury 
College (1908- ). ^BK. 


V A C 1 T I. T V 




ENNIS B. WOMACK 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Union College (1920); A.M. 
(1921); Ph.D., University of Chicago 
(1931); Assistant Professor Chemistry, 
Middlebury College (1930- ). ATfi, 

v — 


BENJAMIN F. WISSLER 

Instructor in Physics ami Mathematics 

B.S., Muhlenberg College (1926); M.A., 
Columbia University (1932); Instructor 
Physics and Mathematics, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1930- ). ‘tvKT. 


CHARLES B. WRIGHT 
Professor Emeritus of Rhetoric and Eng- 
lish Literature 

A.B., Buchtel College (1880); A.M. 
(1885); L.H.D. (1905); Litt.D., Middlc- 
bury College (1917); Professor Rhetoric 
and English Literature, Middlebury Col- 
lege (1885-1920); Professor Emeritus 
(1920- ). ^AS, 4 >BK. 



29 






MARION L. YOUNG 
Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Middlebury College (1924); As- 
sistant Professor Physical Education, Mid- 
dlebury College (1918-1921); Associate 
Professor (1922- ). 


30 


Nineteen Hundred Thirty- 
five. . . .Nineteen Hundred 
Thirty-six. .Nineteen 

Hundred Thirty-seven. . . . 
Nineteen Hundred Thirty- 
eight. 


h: 


§ 


€ L 




HAINES BROCK MATHEWSON SHAFIROFF 
HARRIS FULTON LITTLEFIELD ALLEN 


C I. A S S o F F I C E II S 

MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


PHILIP H. MATHEWSON 
President 

ELLIS K. HAINES 
Secretary 


CHARLES SHAFIROFF 
Vice-President 

JAMES S. BROCK 
T re usurer 


WOMEN’S COLLEGE 
AT MIDDLEBURY 


LOUISE H. FULTON 
President 


ROSAMOND ALLEN 
Vice-President 


GRACE M. HARRIS 
Secretary 


PATRICIA LITTLEFIELD 
T reasurer 


s i: Hf ions 


3 1 


>i i i» i» i. i: it it it y 


C o i. i. k a i: 


ROGER MATTHEW BAKEY, AKE 

BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2) (M); 

Baseball (2, 3) (M); Fiockey (3) (M); "M” Club; 

Frosh Frolic Committee. 

HARRY SELFRIDGE BARKER, AKE 

GLENS FALLS, NEW YORK 

Basketball (3); Baseball (1, 2, 3) (M), Co-Captain 
(4); Track (1) (M); *'M” Club; Athletic Council 
(4); Orchestra (1); Blue Key (3, 4). 

GERALD ORSON BARRETT, AKE 

BRATTLEBORO, VERMONT 

Freshman Football; Winter Sports (1); Intramural 
Athletics (2, 3); Campus Tryout (1). 

LESTER HOAG BENSON, A 2 <i> 

DOVER PLAINS, NEW YORK 

Basketball (4); Baseball (1, 2); Freshman Cross 

Country; Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); Assistant 
Manager Hockey (3), Manager (4); "M" Club; Class 
I reasurcr (2); Assistant Advertising Manager 1935 
KALEIDOSCOPE; Soph Hop Committee; Junior Week 
Committee; Blue Key (3, 4). 

CHESTER ERVING BILLINGTON, K 4 >K 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

WALTER EDWARD BOEHM, AKE 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3, 4) 
(M), Co-Captain (4); Track (1, 2, 3) (M); Relay 

(2, 3); **M” Club; Class President (3); Student Life 
Committee (4); Athletic Council (4); Student Council 
(3, 4), President (4); President Undergraduate Asso- 
ciation (4); Alchemist Club (3, 4), President (4); 
German Club (1, 2); Chairman Frosh Frolic Commit- 
tee; Alumni Award (2); Blue Key (2, 3, 4), Secretary- 
Treasurer (3), President (4); Waubanakee, Vice- 
President. 

RUDOLPH VICTOR BONA, A 2 $ 

DOVER PLAINS, NEW YORK 

Baseball (1, 2, 3) (M); Freshman Cross Country 

(Numerals); "M” Club. 

JOHN HODGSON BLAKE 

NEW BRITAIN, CONNECTICUT 

Tryout Assistant Manager Tennis (2); Dramatics (3, 
4); Wig and Pen Masque (4). 

JAMES SIDNEY BROCK, KAP 

SOUTH NEWBURY, VERMONT 

Class Treasurer (4); Dramatics (1); Liberal Club 
( 3 > 4 )- 

DONALD STERLING BROWN, AT 

DERBY, CONNECTICUT 

Freshman Football; Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Assistant Manager Track (3), Manager (4); "M” Club; 
Band (1, 2); Glee Club (2, 3); German Club (1, 2, 3); 
Soph Hop Committee. 


FRANCIS HAROLD CADY, BK 

BELLOWS FALLS, VERMONT 

Track (1, 2, 3) (M); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 
4); Tryout Assistant Manager Cross Country (2); "M’* 
Club; Glee Club (2, 3); Choir (3, 4); Choral Club 

(2) ; Junior Week Committee (3); Merrill Prize Speak- 
ing; Dean’s List (1, 2). 

RUSSELL ALLEN CLARK, JR., 2 <f>E 

PAWLET, VERMONT 

Freshman Football; Football (2, 4); Intramural Ath- 
letics (1, 2, 3, 4); Campus Tryout (1); Assistant Cir- 
culation Manager 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE. 

DAVID ORVIS COLLINS, AT 

HINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3, 4) 
(M); Track (2) (M); "M” Club; Black Panthers (1, 
2, 3 ). 

ANTHONY J. COSTALDO, A 2 <I> 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

Track (1, 2); Freshman Cross Country (Numerals); 
Cross Country (2, 3); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 
4); Manager Freshman Football (3); Class Treasurer 

(3) ; Interfraternity Council (3, 4); Spanish Club (1, 
2, 3, 4), Treasurer (3). 

RICHARD WHITNEY CUSHING, KAP 

FITCHBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 
Freshman Football; Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Tryout Assistant Manager Baseball (2); Feature Editor 
1935 KALEIDOSCOPE; Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Choir 
(1, 2, 3, 4); Junior Week Committee. 

FRANCIS JAMES DONAHUE. AKE 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

Intramural Athletics (1); Dean’s List (1, 2). 
ELLIOT FIUBBARD DORGAN, 2 <t>E 

EAST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY 
Freshman Football; Baseball (1, 2, 3); Intramural 
Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4). 

GEORGE ALEXANDER ELLIOTT, <*> 2 K, K 4 >K 

MALONE, NEW YORK 

Cornell University (1); Intramural Athletics (2, 3); 
Saxonian Business Tryout (3); Liberal Club (4); Secre- 
tary Kappa Phi Kappa (4). 

HENRY TOWER EMMONS, 

WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 
Class Treasurer (1); Class President (2); Literary 
Editor 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE; Student Council (2), 
Secretary; Interfraternity Council (3, 4), Secretary- 
Treasurer (3), President (4); Debating (3); Liberal 
Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Vicc-President-Treasurer (2), Presi- 
dent (4); College Curriculum Committee (3); Junior 
Week Committee; Winter Carnival Committee (4); 
Parker Prize Speaker; First Merrill Prize Speaker; Blue 
Key (2, 3, 4), Vice-President (4); Waubanakee, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer. 


32 


LESTER HERBERT EVANS, 2 *E 

WATERTOWN, CONNECTICUT 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3, 4) 
(M); Track (1, 2, 3); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 
4); "M” Club. 

CARL AUGUST GRUGGEL, JR., X* 

BEECHHURST, NEW YORK 

Intramural Athletics (i, 2, 3, 4); Glee Club (1, 2, 
3, 4); Choir (4). 


ELLIS KNICKERBOCKER HAINES, X*E 

POM I RET CENTER, CONNECTICUT 

Freshman Cross Country (Numerals); Intramural 
Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); Assistant Manager Tennis (3), 
Manager (4); Class Secretary (4); Campus News Staff 

(2), Assistant Editor (3); Alchemist Club (3); Ger- 
man Club (1, 2). 


BENJAMIN MINER HAYWARD, JR., *BK 

WEYBRIDGE, VERMONT 

Campus News Staff (2); German Club (2); Dean’s 
List (1, 2). 


BURTON CALHOUN HOLMES, AKE, IIAE, K*K 

BRANDON, VERMONT 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); Assistant Business 
Manager Campus (3), Business Manager (4); Business 
Manager 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE; Business Manager 
Saxonian (4); Liberal Club (3); Alchemist Club (3); 
Chairman Soph Hop Committee; Junior Week Commit- 
tee. 


LELAND OTIS HUNT, AS* 

MEXICO, MAINE 

Dartmouth College (1); Assistant Manager Baseball 
3), Manager (4); Editor-in-Chicf 1935 KALEIDO- 
SCOPE; Liberal Club (2, 3); English Club (3, 4); 
German Club (3, 4); Junior Week Committee; Literati 
Ball Committee (3); Blue Key (3, 4); Dean’s List (2). 


WILLIAM ARBUCKLF. HUNTER, AKE 

HUDSON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Track (1, 2) (M); Freshman Cross Country; Third 
Place Decathlon (1), First (3); Intramural Athletics 
(1, 2, 3, 4); "M” Club. 

JOSEPH HOLLISTER JACKSON, X*E, K*K, *BK 

SPRINGFIELD, VERMONT 

Winter Sports (1, 3); Assistant Manager Freshman 
Football; Class Secretary (3); Photography Editor 1935 
KALEIDOSCOPE; Dean’s List (1, 2). 


FRANK STANLEY JANAS, AT 

WARE, MASSACHUSETTS 

Freshman Cross Country; Assistant Manager Football 

(3), Manager (4) (M); "M” Club; Intramural Ath- 

letics (1, 2, 3); Circulation Manager 1935 KALEIDO- 
SCOPE; Alchemist Club (3); German Club (2); 
Liberal Club (1, 2, 3); Junior Prom Committee; Dean's 
List (1). 


MATTHEW JOHN KOTOWSKI, AT 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

Track (2); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); Hand- 
ball Champion (1, 2, 3); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout 
(2); Glee Club (3, 4); Choir (3, 4); French Club 
(1, 2, 3). 

CHARLES ARTHUR KUSTER, KAP 

FLUSHING, NEW YORK 

Track (1, 2); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Assistant Manager Golf (3), Manager (4); Campus 
Business Tryout (1, 2); Liberal Club (3, 4); German 
Club (1, 2). 

ARNOLD ROBERTSON LAFORCE, KAP, K*K 

HILLSIDE, NEW JERSEY 

Basketball (2, 3); Tennis (1, 2, 3) (M), Captain- 

Elect (4); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); Tryout 
Assistant Manager Track (2); Class Vice-President (2); 
Sports Editor 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE; Student Council 

(4); Interfraternity Council (3, 4); Athletic Council 
(4); Band (1); Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Liberal Club (3, 
4); Soph Hop Committee (2); Chairman Junior Week 
Committee; Blue Key (2, 3); Waubanakee, President. 

FRANK LOMBARDY, BK 

MANCHESTER DEPOT, VERMONT 

Freshman Football; Football (2, 3, 4) (M); Hockey 

( x » 3» 4); Track (1, 2, 3, 4) (M); Golf (1, 2, 3, 4) 
(M); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); "M” Club; 
Interfraternity Council (3, 4); Junior Week Commit- 
tee (3); Blue Key (3, 4); Dean’s List (2). 

ARNOLD ROBERT MANCHESTER, JR., KAP 

MAMARONECK, NEW YORK 

Intramural Athletics (1); Campus Tryout (1). 
PHILIP HOYT MATHEWSON, KAP 

LYNDON CENTER, VERMONT 

Track (1, 2, 3, 4) (M), Captain (4); Tryout Assis- 
tant Manager Hockey (2); Intramural Athletics (i, 2, 
3, 4); ”M” Club; Class President (4); Assistant Cir- 
culation Manager 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE; Student 
Council (4); Treasurer Undergraduate Association (4); 
Athletic Council (4); Junior Prom Committee; Winter 
Carnival Committee (3, 4). 

DONALD WILFRED MILES, 2 *E 

BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Track (1); Winter Sports (3, 4); Intramural Sports 
(1, 2, 3, 4); Campus Tryout (1, 2); Band (1, 2, 3); 
Glee Club (2, 3); Choir (3, 4); Orchestra (1); French 
Club (1); Winter Carnival Committee (3, 4); Dean’s 
List (2). 

JAMES SOUTHWELL MILLAR, B'P 

PLYMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2); Assistant Manager Cross 
Country (3), Manager (4); Campus Tryout (1); 
Dramatics (1, 2, 3, 4); Wig and Pen Masque (4). 

RAYMOND KENNETH MINER, KAP 

BRANDON, VERMONT 

Hockey (4); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Band (1, 2, 3); Soph Hop Committee; Junior Week 
Committee. 


33 


PEMBROKE LUCIUS NIMS, AKE 

TOVNSEND, MASSACHUSETTS 

Intramural Athletics (i, a, 3, 4); Assistant Business 
Manager Campus (3), Advertising Manager (4); Band 
(1, 2, 3, 4), Manager (4); Glee Club (2, 3); Choir 
(3> 4)- 

RUSSELL CAPRON NORTON, -T>E 

MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Cross Country (1, 2, 3, 4); Tennis (3); German 
Club (2). 

HILLES RYAN PICKENS, JR., AT 

MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA 

Hockey (1, 2) (M); Golf (2) (M); Intramural 

Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); "M” Club; Feature Writer Cam- 
pus (4). 

DALE BRYANT PRITCHARD, KAP 

FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); Alchemist Club (3, 
4); German Club (2); Dean’s List (1). 

OTTO WILLIAM PROCHAZKA, JR., AKE 

FLUSHING, NEW YORK 

Track (1, 2, 3) (M); Indoor Relay Team (3); Third 
Decathlon Prize (2), Second (3); Intramural Athletics 

(3) ; "M” Club; Campus Assistant Editor (3), Editor- 
in-Chief (4); Art Editor 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE; 
Dramatics (1, 4); Student Council (4); Vice-President 
Undergraduate Association (4); Interfraternity Council 
(3, 4); Junior Week Committee; Blue Key (2, 3, 4). 

KENNETH WALKER RUDD, AKE 

GLENBROOK, CONNECTICUT 

Hockey (2); Track (3, 4); Tennis (2, 3, 4) (M); 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); Cheer Leader (3). 

JOHN SCHOONMAKER, X* 

MARLBORO, NEW YORK 

Track (1, 2) (M); "M” Club; Class Treasurer (2); 
Band (1); Black Panthers (4). 

LAURENS CLARK SEELYE, XT' 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Track (1); Freshman Cross Country (Numerals); 
Intramural Sports (1, 2, 3, 4); Glee Club (4); Frosh 
Frolic Committee; Junior Week Committee. 

CHARLES SHAFIROFF 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

Freshman Football; Football (2, 3, 4) (M); "M” 

Club; Class Vice-President (4); Alchemist Club (3, 4); 
German Club (1); Junior Week Committee. 

W. WYMAN SMITH, X«l>E 

ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA 

Cross Country (3, 4); Assistant Manager Freshman 
Football (2); Assistant Manager Winter Sports (3), 
Manager (4); Campus Business Tryout (1, 2); Assis- 
tant Advertising Manager 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE; De- 
bating (1); Assistant Manager Debating (3); Mountain 
Club Governing Board (3, 4), President Mountain Club 

(4) ; Winter Carnival Committee (3); Junior Week 
Committee; Third Merrill Prize Speaker. 


ROBERT THEODORE STAFFORD, AT, K<I>K 

RUTLAND, VERMONT 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3, 4) 
(M); Track (3); Assistant Manager Basketball (3), 
Manager (4); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); "M” 
Club; Assistant Business Manager Campus (3); Adver- 
tising Manager 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE; Interfraternity 
Council (3, 4); Debating (1); Band (1); Frosh Frolic 
Committee; Junior Week Committee; Second Parker 
Prize; Fourth Merrill Prize; Blue Key (3, 4). 

HYATT HOWE WAGGONER, BK 

POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK 

Organization Editor 1933 KALEIDOSCOPE; Drama- 
tics (1, 3); Liberal Club (4); Spanish Club (1, 2, 3); 
Prize Speaking (1, 2); Dean’s List (2). 

RAYMOND LAWRENCE WHITNEY, XT' 

SALISBURY, VERMONT 

Freshman Football; Football (2, 3, 4) (M); Track 

(1, 2, 3); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3, 4); "M” Club, 
Secretary -Treasurer (3); Campus Business Tryout (2); 
Liberal Club (4); Junior Prom Committee; Blue Key 
(3, 4). 

WILLIAM NOEL WHITTLESEY 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

Yale University (1); Band (3, 4); Orchestra (3, 4); 
Ensemble (3, 4); French Club (2). 

ARTHUR HENRY WILLIAMS, JR., AKE, IIAE 

NEWTON CENTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Winter Sports (1, 2, 3, 4); Intramural Athletics (1, 
3); "M” Club; Managing Editor 1935 KALEIDO- 
SCOPE; Business Manager 1933 Handbook ; Cheer Leader 
(1, 2, 3, 4) (M); Alchemist Club (3, 4); French Club 
(1); German Club (2). 

RICHARD LEIGH WILLIAMS, AT 

HOPKINTON, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3, 4) 
(M), Co-Captain (4); Baseball (2) (M); Track (1) 

(M); ”M” Club; Student Council (4); Secretary Un- 
dergraduate Association (4); Blue Key (3, 4). 

FREDERICK ERNEST WOODBURY 

SALEM, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

CHARLES HENRY WOODMAN, XT' 

RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY 

Class Secretary (2); Campus Business Tryout (1, 2); 
Tryout KALEIDOSCOPE (2); Glee Club (2, 3, 4), 
Manager (4); Chairman Junior Prom Committee; Junior 
Marshall. 

WILLIAM ARNOLD YASINSKI, KAP 

FAIR HAVEN, VERMONT 

Football (3, 4); Intramural Athletics (2, 3). 
JOSEPH JOHN ZAWISTOSKI, KAP 

WEST RUTLAND, VERMONT 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3, 4) 
(M); Basketball (3, 4); Baseball (1, 2, 3) (M), Cap- 
tain-Elect (4); “M”’ Club; Class Vice-President (3); 
Athletic Council (4); Junior Week Committee; Blue 
Key (3, 4); Dean’s List (2). 


34 


W O 31 E > * S 


V O I. I. E ii E 


A T 


>1 I l» l» E E II V II V 


ROSAMOND ALLEN, A*A 

NORTH!- IELD, VERMONT 

Class Basketball (i, 2, 3), Manager (1); Class Base- 
ball (1); Class Vice-President (4); Literary Editor 1935 
KALEIDOSCOPE (3); French Club (1, 2, 3, 4); 

Spanish Club (3); Dean’s List (1, 2). 

DORIS GWENDOLYN ANDERSON, 2 K 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Hockey (1); W. A. A. Archery (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Feature Editor Cam {ms (2, 3); Contributing Editor 
Saxonian (1, 2, 3, 4); Glee Club (2, 3), Secretary- 
Treasurer (3); Choir (2, 3, 4); Choral Club (1); 
English Club (3, 4); French Club (2); Ladies-in-Wait- 
ing Ball Committee (3); Dean’s List (1, 2). 

FAITH ARNOLD, H B<I>, <I>BK 

WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Volleyball (2, 3), All-Midd (2, 3); Class Bas- 
ketball (1, 2, 3); Class Baseball (1, 2, 3), All-Midd (1, 

3) ; Class Vice-President (2); Pan-Hellenic Council (2, 
3, 4); Dramatics (1, 2, 3, 4); Glee Club (1, 2); Choir 
(2, 3, 4); A Tempo Club (3, 4); English Club (3, 4); 
Student Government Council (1); Mortar Board Cup 
(2); Wig and Pen Masque (3, 4); Mortar Board; Dean’s 
List (1, 2). 

ELIZABETH BARTLETT BAILEY 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 

Class Hockey (2, 3, 4); Class Volleyball (1, 3); 
W. A. A. Archery (1); Class Baseball (1, 2, 3); Class 
Vice-President (1); Class President (2); Debating (i); 
Dramatics (1, 2); Choral Club (1); Mountain Club 
Governing Board (3, 4); Student Government Treasurer 
(4); Winter Carnival Committee (3, 4); Junior Week 
Committee. 

MARY GREY BALLARD 

WEST NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Basketball (2); Class Baseball (3); KALEIDO- 
SCOPE Tryout (2); Art Editor Saxonian (3, 4), Con- 
tributing Editor (4); Glee Club (1); Choir (2, 3, 4); 
Orchestra (1, 2); Ensemble (1, 2); A Tempo Club (3, 

4) ; English Club (3, 4); French Club (4); German 
Club (3); Winter Carnival Committee (3, 4). 

GRACE ELIZABETH BATES, *M, ‘I>BK 

ALBANY, NEW YORK 

Class Hockey (2, 3, 4); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3, 4), 
All-Midd (2, 3); Class Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), Captain 
(2, 3); Class Baseball (1); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout 

(2) ; French Club (r, 2, 3, 4); Treasurer W. A. A. 
(4); Dean’s List (2). 

ROBERTA ELIZABETH BOURNE, $M 

AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3, 4); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3, 
4); Class Basketball (1, 2, 3); Pan-Hellenic Council 

(3) ; Dramatics (3, 4); Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Choir (2, 
3, 4); A Tempo Club (4); German Club (3); W. A. A. 
Secretary (1, 2). 

FRANCES ELIZABETH BOUTON 

FULTONV1LLE, NEW YORK 

Class Volleyball (1); Campus Tryout (1); Contrib- 
uting Editor Saxonian (4); Orchestra (3, 4); A Tempo 
Club (3, 4); Choral Club (2); English Club (4); 
French Club (1, 2, 3, 4). 


MARIETTE RAE BOWLES 

FRANCONIA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Contributing Editor Saxonian (3), Associate Editor 
(3, 4); Choral Club (2); English Club (3, 4); First 
Prize Saxonian Short Story Contest (3); Third Prize 
Saxonian Essay Contest (4); Dean’s List (2). 

VERA RUBY BROOKS 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

Class Archery (1); A Tempo Club (3, 4). 

ELIZABETH JANE BRYAN, KK V 

WEST SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 
Class Basketball (1); Dramatics (1, 2, 3, 4); Glee 
Club (2, 3, 4); French Club (3, 4). 

E. DOROTHY CANFIELD, ASA, TKA 

MADISON, NEW JERSEY 

Class Volleyball (1); Class Basketball (1); Campus 
Iryout (1); Pan-Hellenic Council (3, 4), Secretary- 
Treasurer (4); Debating (1, 2, 3); English Club (4); 
Student Government Council (2, 3); Vice-President 

Student Government (3); Junior Week Committee (3); 
Mortar Board (3, 4), President (4). 

FRANCES MARSTON CHAFFEE 

ORLEANS, VERMONT 

Class Volleyball (1); W. A. A. Archery (1, 2); 
Campus News Staff (2), Assistant Editor (3), Women’s 
Editor (4); Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Orchestra (1, 2, 3); 
Ensemble (2, 3); English Club (3, 4), Secretary-Treas- 
urer (3), Vice-President (4); French Club (1, 2, 3, 
4); Mortar Board; Dean’s List (1, 2). 

MARJORIE IRENE CLARK 

PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

Campus Tryout (1); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); 
Choral Club (1); French Club (1, 2, 3, 4); German 
Club (3, 4); Spanish Club (3, 4); Kellogg Latin- 
English Prize (2). 

MARY ELIZABETH CLARK, AAA 

EAST ORANGE, NF.W JERSEY 

Class Volleyball (1); Campus News Staff (2), Assis- 
tant Editor (3); Dramatics (2, 3, 4). 

MAYWOOD LOUISE CLOUGH 

RANDOLPH, VERMONT 

A Tempo Club (3, 4); French Club (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Spanish Club (3, 4). 

ELIZABETH COLEY, KKF 

WEST BOYLSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Basketball (1, 2); Class Baseball (1, 2, 3); 
Assistant Business Manager Campus (2), Associate Busi- 
ness Manager (3, 4); Student Council (4); Frosh Frolic 
Committee (1); Winter Carnival Committee (3); Co- 
Chairman, Junior Week (3). 

MOLLIE CONVERSE 

BRIDPORT, VERMONT 

W. A. A. Archery (1, 2); Spanish Club (2, 3, 4). 


35 


ALICE ELIZABETH COOKE, 2K 

WESTFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

Glee Club (i, 2, 3, 4); Dramatics (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Choir (3, 4); Choral Club (1); A Tempo Club (4); 
German Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Secretary-Treasurer (2, 3, 
4); Spanish Club (3). 

DOROTHY MINA CROWE, 4>BK 

ST. JOHNSBURY, VERMONT 

Campus Tryout (1); English Club (3, 4); French 
Club (2, 3); Dean’s List (1, 2). 

ESTHER FRANCES DAMERELL, £K 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Basketball (1); Campus Tryout (1, 2); 

KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); Dramatics (1); Spanish 
Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Spanish Carnival Committee (2). 

RUTH WINNIFRED DAMERELL, 2K 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Hockey (2); Class Basketball (3); Campus 
Tryout (2); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (3); Dramatics 
(2, 3, 4); French Club (1, 2, 3). 

ALMA HOMER DAVIS, K K Y 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

Class Hockey (1, 3, 4); Class Volleyball (2, 3); 
Class Basketball (2, 3); Class Baseball (3); English 
Club (4); French Club (1, 2); German Club (2); 
Winter Carnival Committee (3). 

DOROTHEA DE CHIARA, <*>BK 

RIDGEFIELD PARK, NEW JERSEY 

Class Volleyball (1); Choral Club (1); English Club 
(4); French Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Spanish Club (3, 4); 
Dean’s List (1, 2). 

ELEANOR MARY DUKE, ASA 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 

Class Volleyball (1); Class Basketball (1, 2); Class 
Baseball (1, 2, 3); Class Treasurer (2, 3); Glee Club 
(2, 3, 4); Choir (3, 4); A Tempo Club (3, 4), Presi- 
dent (4); French Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Junior Week Com- 
mittee (3); Mortar Board. 

NATALIE HELEN DUNSMOOR, 2K 

WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3, 4); Class Basketball (1); 
Choral Club (1, 2); French Club (1, 2). 

VIRGINIA ELIZABETH EASLER, <*>BK 

MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Class Editor 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE; Secretary Stu- 
dent Government Association (3), President (4); French 
Club (1, 2, 3); German Club (3, 4); Spanish Club 
(3); Junior Week Committee (3); Winter Carnival 
Committee (3); Student Life Committee (4); Mortar 
Board; Dean’s List (1, 2). 

SARAH LOUISE ELLIOTT 

CLAREMONT, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Glee Club (3, 4); Choral Club (1); Ensemble (1, 
2, 3, 4); Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4); A Tempo Club (3, 
4); French Club (3, 4); German Club (4). 


LOUISE TOWLE FEATHER 

MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Class Volleyball (1); Assistant Circulation Manager 
1933 KALEIDOSCOPE; English Club (4); French 
Club (1, 2). 

AVIS ELEANOR FISCHER, 2K 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

Campus Tryout (2); Assistant Business Manager 
Campus (3); Associate Advertising Manager 1935 
KALEIDOSCOPE; Choral Club (1); French Club (1, 
-1 3« 4)> Treasurer (3); German Club (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Assistant Manager Debating (3); Mortar Board. 

ALICE EMMA FLAGG, 1TB<I>, 3>BK 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3, 4); Class Basketball (1, 2, 

3) ; Campus Tryout (2); French Club (1, 2); Dean’s 
List (1, 2). 

LOUISE GESINE FLEIG, 2K 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

Class Volleyball (2); Dramatics (2, 3, 4); Choral 
Club (1); German Club (1, 2, 3, 4), President (2, 3, 

4) ; Spanish Club (4); Winter Carnival Committee (3). 

LOUISE HAMMOND FULTON, IIIM> 

ASBURY PARK, NEW JERSEY 

Class Hockey (3, 4); Class Volleyball (2, 3, 4); 
Class Basketball (2); Class Baseball (1, 2, 3), Manager 

(2) , Captain (2), All-Midd (1, 3); Class President 
(4); Glee Club (3, 4); French Club (3, 4); Spanish 
Club (3, 4), Secretary (4); |unior Week Committee 

(3) . 

JESSIE MARY GIBSON, AAA 

SPENCER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Hockey (1); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3); Class 
Basketball (1, 2, 3); Class Baseball (2, 3); Pan-Hellenic 
Council (3, 4); Dramatics (3, 4); Mountain Club 
Governing Board (4); Spanish Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Win- 
ter Carnival Committee (3); Wig and Pen Masque (4). 

ELEANOR GOODRICH, 3»M 

BENSON, VERMONT 

Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3); Class Basketball (1, 2); 
KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); French Club (1, 2, 3). 

DOROTHY GRAY, TIB4> 

KATONAH, NEW YORK 

Class Hockey (3, 4); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3), All- 
Midd (r, 3); Class Basketball (1, 2, 3), Captain (1), 
All-Midd (1, 2, 3); Class Baseball (1, 2), All-Midd 
(1); Glee Club (3, 4); Mountain Club Governing 
Board (1, 2); French Club (1, 3, 4); Spanish Club 
(3); Junior Prom Committee; Spanish Carnival Com- 
mittee (3); Winter Carnival Committee (3); Ladies-in- 
Waiting Ball Committee (4). 

ELIZABETH HALPIN, HB<f> 

RUTHERFORD, NEW JERSEY 

Class Volleyball (1, 2); Class Basketball (1); Class 
Baseball (1); Campus News Staff (2); French Club 
(1, 2, 3); Frosh Frolic Committee. 


36 


MARGERY THOMPSON HANCHETT, 2 K 

NATICK, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Volleyball (i, 2); Class Basketball (1); Class 
Secretary (3); Photography Editor 1-9 3 5 KALEIDO- 
SCOPE; Pan-Hellenic Council (3, 4); Student Govern- 
ment Council (3); Dramatics (2, 3, 4); Glee Club 
(2, 3, 4); A Tempo Club (3, 4), Secretary-Treasurer 
(4); Spanish Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Secretary (3). Presi- 
dent (4); Wig and Pen Masque (3, 4), Treasurer (4); 
Mortar Board. 

GRACE MARION HARRIS, K K V 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 4); Manager Hockey (3); Class 
Baseball (1, 2, 3); Class Secretary (1, 2, 4); Pan- 
Hellenic Council (3, 4), President (4); A Tempo Club 
(4); Glee Club (3, 4); French Club (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Spanish Club (3); Junior Prom Committee. 

RUTH LOHSE HAVARD 

ALLENTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 

English Club (3, 4); French Club (2, 3, 4); German 
Club (4); Winter Carnival Committee (3). 

ELIZABETH WHITNEY HIGGINS, ( EBK 

SOUTHBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

Campus News Staff (2); Associate Editor 1933 
KALEIDOSCOPE; Contributing Editor Saxoniau (1), 
Associate Editor (2), Editor-in-Chief (3, 4); Choral 
Club (1, 2); English Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Spanish Club 
(1, 2, 3, 4); Soph Hop Committee; Chairman Spanish 
Carnival Committee (4); First Prize Saxoniau Short 
Story Contest (2); Mortar Board; Dean's List (1, 2). 

DORIS LOUIS HILLER, LIB# 

PORT WASHINGTON, NEW YORK 

Dramatics (2, 3, 4); Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); A 
Tempo Club (4); Dean’s List (2). 

MARY-ELIZABETH HINCKS, ASA 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3); Class Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Dean's List (2). 

MARY ALICE HOWARD 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

Class Hockey (1); Class Basketball (1, 2); A Tempo 
Club (3, 4); Dean’s List (2). 

ESTHER MARY JOHNSON, ASA 

AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Volleyball (1, 4); Class Basketball (1, 4); 
W. A. A. Archery (1, 2, 3); Class Hockey (2, 4); 
Class Baseball (3); German Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Al- 
chemist Club (4); Frosh Frolic Committee (1); Dean’s 
List (1, 2). 

MARTHA ELIZABETH JORDAN, ASA 

JAMAICA, NEW YORK 

Class Volleyball (1, 3, 4); Campus Tryout (1); 
KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); French Club (1, 2, 3); 
Spanish Club (3, 4). 


GERTRUDE EVELYN KNIGHT 

BELCHERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS 

Campus Tryout (1); Assistant Circulation Manager 
1933 KALEIDOSCOPES; Advertising Manager Saxoniau 
(3, 4); Assistant Business Manager llaml book (3); 
Dramatics (2, 3); Glee Club (2); Choir (3); Choral 
Club (1); Iinglish Club (4); French Club (1, 2, 3); 
German Club (3, 4). 

JOSEPHINE KNOX, HB«I» 

RIDGEFIELD PARK, NEW JERSEY 

Campus News Staff (2); Dramatics (1, 2, 3, 4); 
English Club (3, 4), President (4); French Club (1, 2, 

3) ; Spanish Club (3). 

FRANCES AUGUSTA LAMSON, AAA 

RANDOLPH, VERMONT 

Campus News Staff (2); Orchestra (2, 3); A Tempo 
Club (3, 4); French Club (2, 3). 

HELEN LOUISE LINDBERG, <t»BK 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3, 4), Captain (3), All-Midd 
(2, 3, 4); Class Basketball (t, 2, 3); Class Vice-Presi- 
dent (3); Assistant Editor Handbook (2); 1935 

KALEIDOSCOPE Sports Editor; English Club (4); 
French Club (1, 2, 3, 4); German Club (3, 4); 
Spanish Club (3); Student Council (3); W. A. A. 
Council (4); Mortar Board; Dean’s List (1, 2). 

PATRICIA LITTLEFIELD 

READING, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Treasurer (4); Campus News Staff (2); Stu- 
dent Council (4); English Club (3, 4); German Club 
(4); Junior Week Committee; Wig and Pen Masque 
(4); Dean’s List (1, 2). 

ELIZABETH HUDSON LOOMIS, 

GLASTONBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3, 4); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3, 

4) , Captain (2); All-Midd Volleyball (1, 3); Class 
Basketball (2, 4), All-Midd Basketball (1); Class Base- 
ball (2); Vice-President W. A. A. (3); Campus News 
Staff (2); 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout; Dramatics 
(4); Junior Week Committee. 

PATIENCE LYON, 

PERKINSV1LLE, VERMONT 

Class Volleyball (1, 2); Class Hockey (t, 2); KALEI- 
DOSCOPE Tryout (2); Choir (3, 4); A Tempo Club 
(4) ; Dean’s List (2) . 

MARJORIE MCCANN, 2 Iv 

ARLINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 4), Captain (1); Dramatics (1, 

2, 3); German Club (1, 2, 3, 4); English Club (4); 
Wig and Pen Masque (3, 4), Secretary -Treasurer (4); 
Dean’s List (1). 

LOIS MACK, HB<I> 

DOVER, DELAWARE 

Assistant Circulation Manager 1935 KALEIDO- 
SCOPE; Assistant Advertising Manager Saxoniau (3), 
Manager (4); A Tempo Club (4); French Club (1, 2, 

3 . 4 )* 



DOROTHY MASKELL, A£A 

LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS 

Campus Tryout (i); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); 
Junior Week Committee. 

ANNA GENOEFFA MIRANTE 

NORTH ADAMS, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Hockey (1, 2); Class Basketball (1, 2); French 
Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Spanish Club (3, 4). 

HELEN FISHER PARSONS, AHA 

WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK 

Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3, 4); Campus Tryout (2); 
KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); French Club (1, 2, 3, 
4 ). 

LUCY ANNE ROBERTS, A£A 

WEBSTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

French Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Dramatics (2, 3); Spanish 
Club (3, 4); Dean’s List (1, 2). 

MARION WADSWORTH RUSSELL, I 1 B<P 

BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT 

Class Basketball (1); Dramatics (2, 3, 4); French 
Club (3). 

LAEL SARGENT 

LUDLOW, VERMONT 

Class Volleyball (2); Spanish Club (2). 

ELIZABETH ALICE SEELEY 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

A Tempo Club (3, 4); Dean’s List (2). 

NORMA RUSSELL SELLECK 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

Campus Tryout (1); Spanish Club (1, 2); Dean’s 
List (1, 2). 

MIRIAM ELIZABETH SMITH, 2 K 

NEWPORT, VERMONT 

Class Volleyball (2, 3); Class Basketball (2); Class 
Baseball (2); Assistant Business Manager Campus (2, 
3), Associate Advertising Manager (4); Associate Busi- 
ness Manager 1935 KALEIDOSCOPE; French Club (1, 
2, 3); Mountain Club Governing Board (3, 4); Soph 
Hop Committee; Wig and Pen Masque (4). 

ANNE KATHERINE STARK, 2 K 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3, 4); Class Baseball (2); 
KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); French Club (1, 3, 4); 
Spanish Club (3, 4); Dean’s List (1, 2). 


RUTH EVELYN STETSON 

HINSDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Hockey (3, 4); Class Baseball (3); KALEIDO- 
SCOPE Tryout (2); Dramatics (3, 4); French Club 
0 » -» 3» 4); Spanish Club (2, 3, 4). 

LOIS ALYSON STUDLEY 

ATTLEBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Archery (1); Glee Club (4); Choir (4); Or- 
chestra (1, 2, 3, 4); Ensemble (2, 3, 4); A Tempo 
Club (3, 4); Choral Club (1, 2); Dean’s List (2). 

SUZANNE MARIE TREILLET 

JOHNSTOWN, NEW YORK 

Class Volleyball (1); Glee Club (3, 4); French 
Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Vice-President (3), President (4). 

DORIS PRISCILLA TUCKER, ASA 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3, 4), Manager (1), Captain (2, 
4), All-Midd (1, 2, 3, 4); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3, 
4), Captain (1); Class Basketball (1, 2, 3), All-Midd 
(2, 3); Class President (3); Campus News Staff (2), 
Assistant Editor (3); Organizations Editor 1935 
KALEIDOSCOPE; English Club (4); French Club (i, 

3 > 4); W. A. A. President (4); Student Government 
Council (3); Junior Week Committee; Optima Award 
(3); Mortar Board-; Dean’s List (1, 2). 

MARGARET TUPPER WHITTIER, 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3, 4); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3, 
4); Class Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4); Campus Tryout (1, 
2); Assistant Advertising Manager 1935 KALEIDO- 
SCOPE; Pan-Hellenic Council (3, 4); Choral Club (1); 
French Club (1); German Club (2); Spanish Club (3). 

JEAN CAMERON WILEY 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Orchestra (2, 3, 4); A Tempo Club (3, 4); French 
Club (1, 2, 3, 4); German Club (3, 4); Choral Club 
(1, 2). 

DOROTHY ELIZABETH WILLIAMS 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Class Hockey (3, 4); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Class Basketball (2); Choral Club (1); French Club 
(1); German Club (2). 

MARJORIE YOUNG, KKT 

BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT 

Campus News Staff (2); Feature Editor 1935 
KALEIDOSCOPE; Dramatics (1, 2, 3, 4); English 
Club (3, 4); French Club (3). 


38 





MEACHAM HOXIE HOEHN BROWN 
LYONS WILSON CONLEY RICH 


C L A S S O F F I C E II S 

MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 

EL WOOD A. HOXIE CONRAD HOEHN 

President Vice-President 

ROBERT H. BROWN _ RALPH H. MEACHAM 

Secretary T reasurer 


WOMEN’S COLLEGE 
AT MIDDLEBURY 


M. CHRISTINE CONLEY 
President 

RUTHANNA WILSON 
Secretary 


VIRGINIA RICH 
Vice-President 

BARBARA L. LYONS 
Treasurer 


.1 i; if ions 


39 


. 



LEWIS GEORGE ALLBEE 

EAST HARDWICK, VERMONT 
LYNDON INSTITUTE 

KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); Assistant Business 
Manager Saxonian (3); Dramatics (1, 2); French 
Club (1, 2, 3); German Club (2, 3); Spanish Club 
(3); Wig and Pen Masque (3); Dean’s List (2). 


JOHN MILTON AVERY, JR., KAP 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 
WILLISTON ACADEMY 

Debating (1, 2, 3); Liberal Club (2, 3), Chair- 
man Program Committee (3); Fourth Merrill Prize 
Speaker; Dean’s List (1, 2). 


FRANK SUTTON BOYCE, AKE 

WEST POINT, NEW YORK 
NORWICH FREE ACADEMY 

Track (2); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); As- 
sistant Manager Freshman Football; Tryout Assist- 
ant Manager Football (2); Campus Tryout (1); 
Business Manager 1936 KALEIDOSCOPE; Cheer- 
leader ( 3 ) . 


.1 I! X I O IK S 


40 



ANGUS MCLEOD BROOKS, AY 

ST. JOHNSBURY, VERMONT 

ST. JOHNSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

Hockey (2, 3) (M) ; Intramural Athletics (1); 
Assistant Manager Tennis (3); "M” Club; Class 
Secretary (2); Alchemist Club (3); Winter Carni- 
val Committee (3). 


VICTOR MICHAEL BREEN, AY 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 
FLUSHING HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football; Intramural Athletics (1, 2); 
Tryout Assistant Manager Track (2); Alchemist 
Club (2, 3). 


ROBERT JOHN BRAUNWARTH. BK 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 
CURTIS HIGH SCHOOL 

Track (1, 2); Freshman Cross Country; German 
Club (1, 3). 


4 1 


9 


I IT \ IOIIS 



ROBERT HOLMES BROWN, KAP 

ST. ALBANS, VERMONT 
BELLOWS FREE ACADEMY 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3) 
(M); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); "M” Club; 
Class Treasurer (1); Class Secretary (3); Interfra- 
ternity Council (3), Secretary-Treasurer (3); Frosh 
Frolic Committee. 


ROBERT BOYCE BRYANT, X* 

MALONE, NEW YORK 
FRANKLIN ACADEMY 

Freshman Cross Country; Dramatics (1, 2, 3); 
Wig and Pen Masque (3). 


HOWARD STEVENSON CADY, AY 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 
MIDDLEBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3); 
Winter Sports (2, 3); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 
3); Assistant Manager Basketball (3); Assistant 
Business Manager Campus (3); Mountain Club 
Governing Board (3). 


I U X I O IK S 




ALBERT RICHARD CHASE, KAP 

KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
KEENE HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (i, 2); Tryout Assistant 
Manager Basketball (2); Campus Business Tryout 
( 1, 2) ; Band ( 1, 2, 3 ) ; Glee Club ( 1, 2, 3 ) , Assis- 
tant Manager (3); Choir (2, 3). 


WILLIAM HOYT CARTER, JR., KAP, K<I>K 

VERGENNES, VERMONT 
VERGENNES HIGH SCHOOL 

Assistant Manager Winter Sports (3); Class 
Nominating Committee (3) ; Campus, Assistant Edi- 
tor ( 3 ) ; Managing Editor 1936 KALEIDOSCOPE; 
Editor-in-Chief 1934 Handbook; English Club (3); 
Liberal Club (3); Dean’s List (1, 2). 


JOHN BARTHOLOMEW ADRIAN CARON, 
JR., X* 

NORWICH, CONNECTICUT 

NORWICH FREE ACADEMY 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); Tryout Manager 
Golf (2); Campus Tryout (1). 


43 


I IT \ I O IK K 



MERRITT PIERCE CLONAN, ARE, K<LK 

MINEVILLE, NEW YORK 
MINEVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2) 
(M) ; Basketball (1, 2, 3) (M), Captain (3); In- 
tramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); **M” Club; Athletic 
Council; Alchemist Club (2); Spanish Club (3); 
Blue Key (2, 3). 


CLIFFORD TREMAIN CONKLIN, JR., KAP 

BRANDON, VERMONT 
BRANDON HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football; Intramural Athletics (1); 
Tryout Assistant Manager Hockey (2); Assistant 
Business Manager Campus (3) ; Advertising Manager 
1936 KALEIDOSCOPE; Mountain Club Governing 
Board (3); Alchemist Club (3). 


GEORGE HAMDEN DANIELS, 23 >E 

WOODSTOCK, VERMONT 
WOODSTOCK HIGH SCHOOL 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute (1); Intramural 
Athletics (2); Dean’s List (1). 


1 it x ions 


44 





GEORGE HARVEY DEMING, KAP 

WELLS RIVER, VERMONT 
WELLS RIVER HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Cross Country; Campus Tryout (i), 
KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); Debating (1). 


CHARLES ALEXANDER DEEDMAN, JR., X* 

NEW ROCHELLE, NEW YORK 
NEW ROCHELLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Cross Country; Tryout Assistant Mana- 
ger Freshman Football; Campus Tryout (1); Debat- 
ing (1, 2, 3); First Merrill Prize Speaker; Second 
Parker Prize Speaker; Second Lawrence Prize (2); 
Second Wctherell Prize (2); Wig and Pen Masque 
( 3 ). 


JOHN WILLIAM DAWES, AKE 

CLINTON, NEW YORK 
CLINTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2); 
Hockey (1, 2) (M); Intramural Athletics (1, 2); 
"M” Club. 


45 


.1 U X I O IK S 





RICHARD FREDERIC DEMPEWOLFF, KAP 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

GEORGE WASHINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football; Track (2); Manager Fresh- 
man Football (3); Campus Tryout (1); Art Editor 
1936 KALEIDOSCOPE; Dramatics (1, 2, 3); 

Choral Club ( 1 ) ; Mountain Club Governing Board 
(3); Wig and Pen Masque (3). 


DONALD WILLIAM EASLER, X* 

MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
MANCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); Liberal Club (3). 


EVERETT FRANCIS ELLIS, A< 1 >E 

COLONIA, NEW JERSEY 

WOODBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); Tryout Assistant 
Manager Winter Sports (2) ; Tryout Assistant Mana- 
ger Tennis ( 2 ) ; Band ( 1 , 3 ) ; Glee Club ( 1 ) ; Choir 
(3); Liberal Club (3). 


1 it x ions 


46 



RICHARD ORESTES FORBUSH, AKE 

SPRINGFIELD, VERMONT 

MOUNT HERMAN SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals) ; Varsity Football 
(2, 3) (M) ; Track (1, 2) (M); Intramural Ath- 
letics (1, 2, 3); "M” Club. 


EDWIN ROY FISHER, KAP 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

EAST HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (1); Tryout Assistant Mana- 
ger Cross Country (2); Campus Business Tryout (1, 
2); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); Dean’s List (1, 


WILLIAM HARVEY FINIGAN, KAP 

ONEONTA, NEW YORK 
ONEONTA HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Cross Country (Numerals); Class 
Treasurer (2); Campus Tryout (1); Liberal Club 
( 3 ). 


47 


1 r x 1 o it s 




DON SHEPARD GATES 

ENOSBURG FALLS, VERMONT 
ENOSBURG FALLS HIGH SCHOOL 

Dramatics (i, 2); Glee Club (2, 3); English 
Club (2, 3). 


CECIL BURNHAM GODDARD, BK 

GRAFTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

GRAITON HIGH SCHOOL 

Track (1, 2); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); 
Assistant Manager Cross Country (3); Interfratern- 
ity Council (2, 3). 


HERBERT MELLEN GODDARD, BK 

ASHLAND, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 

German Club (1, 2); Dean’s List (1). 


I I X 1 O IK S 


48 



FOSTER COMINGS GREENE, KAP 

RICH FORD, VERMONT 
RICHIORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (i, 2, 3); Liberal Club (3); 
German Club (1, 2); Dean’s List (1, 2). 


EARL MONTGOMERY GOVE, JR., X* 

BRISTOL, VERMONT 
BRISTOL HIGH SCHOOL 

Dramatics (1, 2, 3); Liberal Club (2); Wig and 
Pen Masque ( 3 ) . 


ANTHONY GOLEM BESKE, AKE 

NORWICH, CONNECTICUT 
NORWICH FREE ACADEMY 

Freshman Football (Numerals), Captain; Football 
(2, 3) (M), Captain Elect (3); Assistant Manager 
Track (3); "M” Club; German Club (1). 


49 


1 u \ ions 



MALCOLM EDMUND GROSS, KAP 

ORLEANS, VERMONT 
ORLEANS HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Cross Country; Cross Country (2, 3) 
(M); Band (1, 2); Glee Club (1, 2); Alchemist 
Club (2, 3); German Club (3). 


DOUGLAS TERRY HALL, KAP 

LARCHMONT, NEW YORK 
MAMARONECK HIGH SCHOOL 

Hockey (1, 3); Track (1, 2); Freshman Cross 
Country; Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); Tryout 
Assistant Manager Cross Country (2); Dramatics 
( 3 ). 


CLARENCE WAYNE HARWOOD, BK 

RUPERT, VERMONT 
GRANVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Tryout Assistant Manager Freshman Football; 
Campus News Staff (2), Assistant Editor (3); 
German Club (1, 2); Choral Club (1); Dean’s List 
(*)• 


1 I X IOHS 


50 




CONRAD HOEHN, JR., KAP 

MINEOLA, NEW YORK 
MINF.OLA HIGH SCHOOL 

Basketball (i, 2, 3) (M); Baseball (1, 2, 3) 

(M); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); "M” Club; 
Class Vice-President (3); Soph Hop Committee; 
Blue Key (2, 3). 


ROBERT CARL HILLER, BK, K<LK 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 
EAST HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2); German Club (1). 


CLEMENT SHELDON HILL, BK 

BRISTOL, VERMONT 
BRISTOL HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Cross Country (Numerals); Intramural 
Athletics (1, 2, 3); Band (1, 2, 3), Assistant Mana- 
ger (3). 


5i 


I U X I O II s 



CHARLES JOHN HOLMES, AY 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 
MIDDLEBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football; Winter Sports (2); Tennis 
(1, 2) (M) ; Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); Assist- 
ant Business Manager Campus (3); Spanish Club 

CO- 


EDWIN ALLEN HOWARD, KAP 

CANTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

CANTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Hockey (1, 2); 
Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); Chairman Soph Hop 
Committee. 


ELWOOD ALBERT HOXIE, AKK 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

THAYER ACADEMY 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3) 
(M); Track (1, 2) (M); Second Decathlon (2); 
Relay (2); Intramural Athletics (1, 2); "M” Club, 
Secretary (3); Liberal Club (2, 3); Hazeltine- 
Klevenow Cup (2); Blue Key (2, 3); Dean’s List 
(i> *)• 


S* 


J U \ | O IK S 


■ 



HERBERT FRANKLIN IRISH, JR., AKE 

WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY 
EAST ORANGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Debating (i); Spanish Club (3); Soph Hop Com- 
mittee; Second Parker Prize Speaker. 


RICHARD CARROLL HUBBARD, X* 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 
VERMONT ACADEMY 

Winter Sports (2, 3); Intramural Athletics (1, 
2, 3); Band (1, 2, 3); Black Panthers (2, 3). 


GORDON EVERETT HOYT, KAP 

LYNDONVILLE, VERMONT 
LYNDON INSTITUTE 

Cello Soloist Glee Club (3); Orchestra (1, 2, 3); 
Ensemble (1, 2, 3), Director (3 ); Choral Club (1); 
Dean’s List ( 1, 2) . 


. 


53 


I IT \ I O It S 




ALAN HENDRIE KETCHAM 

STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT 

STAMFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Dramatics (3). 


HENRY HUTCHINS KIRWIN, ARE, K<I>K 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL 

Freshman Football; Track (1); Assistant Manager 
Hockey (3); Business Manager 1934 Handbook; 
Liberal Club (3); German Club (1). 


LAWRENCE FRANCIS LEETE, AY 

WILLI AMSTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS 
WILLIAMSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football; Football (2, 3) (M) ; Basket- 
ball (1, 2, 3) (M); Baseball (1); Golf (1, 2) (M), 
Captain (2': Intramural Athletics (j, 2, 3); "M” 
Club. 


1 it x 1 o 11 s 


54 



JOHN HENRY MARTIN, AKE 

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
SHOREWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2); 
Basketball (1, 2, 3) (M) ; Track (1, 2, 3) (M) ; 
Intramural Athletics (1, 3); Tryout KALEIDO- 
SCOPE (2); German Club (2); Spanish Club (1, 

3 ). 


HENRY FRANKLIN MACLEAN, AKE 

EAST MILTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

MILTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3) 
(M); Hockey (1, 2, 3) (M), Captain (3); Intra- 
mural Athletics (1); Interfraternity Council (3); 
English Club (2, 3); Blue Key (2, 3). 


DONALD JAMES MACDOUGALL, A 2 <f> 

SHERBORN, MASSACHUSETTS 
DEAN ACADEMY 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); Tryout Assistant 
Manager Football (2); Tryout Assistant Manager 
Baseball (2). 


J I x ions 


. 



RALPH HARLAND MEACHAM, A 24 > 

TOWNSHEND, VERMONT 
LELAND AND CRAY SEMINARY 

Baseball (i, 2, 3) (M); Freshman Cross Country 
(Numerals); Cross Country (2, 3) (M), Captain 
(3); Winter Sports (1, 2, 3) (M) ; Intramural 

Athletics (1, 2, 3); "M” Club; Class Treasurer (3); 
Interfraternity Council (3); Choral Club (1); Blue 
Key (2, 3), Secretary-Treasurer. 


FRANK BAKER MOORE, SN 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 
MIDDLEBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

University of Vermont (1); Football (2); 
Hockey (1, 2); Track (2); Tennis (1). 


FREDERICK KELSEY NASH 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 
MIDDLEBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

Tennis (1, 2); Intramural Athletics (1, 2); Al- 
chemist Club (3); German Club (3). 


1 u \ ions 


56 


■ 



BERNARD JAMES O’NEILL, X* 

PORTLAND, MAINE 
DEERING HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (i, 2, 3); Campus Tryout 
(1); Band (1); Glee Club (3); Choir (3). 


PETER SCOTTHORN NEWTON, KAP 

LARCHMONT, NEW YORK 
MAMARONECK HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (2); Glee Club (1, 2); 
Dean’s List ( 1, 2) . 


JOHN EDWARD NASH, KAP 

ST. ALBANS, VERMONT 
ALLENTOWN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (3); 
Baseball (1, 2, 3) (M); Intramural Athletics (1); 
"M” Club; Alchemist Club (1). 


.1 U X ions 


. 




JOHN CRAWFORD PIERCE, AY 

SPRINGFIELD, VERMONT 

DEERFIELD ACADEMY 

Freshman Football; Track (i, 2); Winter Sports 
(1, 2, 3) (M) ; Glee Club (1, 2); Choir (1, 2, 3); 
Orchestra (1, 2, 3); Ensemble (1); Mountain Club 
Governing Board (2). 


NORMAN ALBERT PIERCE 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

TENNESSEE MILITARY INSTITUTE 


DOUGLAS FAIRFIELD REILLY, X* 

HINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

HINGHAM HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); Campus Tryout 
(1); Photography Editor 1936 KALEIDOSCOPE; 
Glee Club ( 1 , 2, 3 ) ; Choir (2, 3 ) ; Liberal Club ( 3 ) ; 
German Club (1); Frosh Frolic Committee; Soph 
Hop Committee. 


1 u x ions 


58 




DOUGLAS CHARLES RUBB, AY 

FLUSHING, NEW YORK 
FLUSHING HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football; Football (3); Intramural Ath- 
letics (1, 2, 3). 


RICHARD EMERY ROSS, X* 

WEST RUTLAND, VERMONT 

WEST RUTLAND HIGH SCHOOL 

Football (3); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3). 


JAMES EDWARD ROBERTS, AY 

MOUNT VERNON, NEW YORK 
GETTYSBURG ACADEMY 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3) 
(M); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); "M” Club; 
Parker Prize Speaker. 


59 


1 r x ioiis 



FRANK JOSEPH RUGGERI, BK 

JOHNSTOWN, NEW YORK 
JOHNSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3) 
(M); Baseball (1); "M” Club. 


BERNARD DANIEL RUMPF, A 24 > 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, NEW YORK 
SARATOGA SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2); 
Track (2); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3). 


VICTOR NELSON SANBORN, 2 <I>E, K<I>K 

MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
TILTON SCHOOL 

Track (1, 2); Dramatics (2); Glee Club (1, 2); 
Choir (3); Choral Club (1); Liberal Club (3); 
Dean’s List (2). 


1 u x ions 


60 



■ 



CHARLES HARRY STARTUP, X* 

MIDDLETOWN, NEW YORK 
MIDDLETOWN HIGH SCHOOL 

Assistant Manager Freshman Football; Assistant 
Manager Football (3); Cheerleader (1, 2, 3); Liberal 
Club (2, 3); German Club (1); Soph Flop Com- 
mittee. 


JOHN REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD, A<I>E 

BRADFORD, VERMONT 
BRADFORD ACADEMY 

Winter Sports (1, 2, 3) (M), Captain (3); In- 
tramural Athletics (1); Campus News Staff (2), 
Sports Editor (3); Band (1, 2, 3); Orchestra (1, 
2); Soph Hop Committee; Chairman Winter Carni- 
val (3). 


HAMILTON SHEA, AY 

LARCHMONT, NEW YORK 
LARCHMONT HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Track (2, 3); 
Campus Tryout (1); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout 
(2); Interfraternity Council (3); Spanish Club (1). 


j u \ ions 


. 



JACK STEELE 

ROCKAWAY, NEW JERSEY 
ROCKAWAY HIGH SCHOOL 

Campus News Staff (i), Assistant Editor (2), 
Managing Editor (3); Editor-in-Chief 1936 KALEI- 
DOSCOPE; Debating (1, 2, 3); Third Parker Prize 
Speaker; Fourth Merrill Prize Speaker; Third 
Lawrence Prize (1, 2); Dean’s List (1, 2). 


MALCOLM MACADAM SWETT, AKE 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

MIDDLEBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

Hockey (1, 2) (M); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 
3); "M” Club; Dean’s List (1, 2). 


PHILIP BURDETTE TAFT, 2 AE 

WALLINGFORD, VERMONT 
WALLINGFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Case School of Applied Science ( 1 ) ; Glee Club 

( 3 ). 


I 1' \ ions 


62 


■ 



STANISLAUS FRANCIS TRYBULSKI 

WESTMINSTER, VERMONT 
WALPOLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Springfield College (i, 2); French Club (3); 
German Club (3). 


ARCHIBALD CHARLES TILFORD, 

LAWRENCEVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 
LA WRENCE VILLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Cross Country (Numerals) ; Cross 
Country (2, 3) (M) ; Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 
3); Class President (1); Debating (1, 2, 3); Liberal 
Club (1, 2, 3), Vice-President-Treasurer (3); Frosh 
Frolic Committee; Second Merrill Prize Speaker. 


MARTIN JOSEPH TIERNEY, A 2 <J> 

WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 
GROSBY HIGH SCHOOL 

Tennis (1, 2, 3) (M) ; Caw pus News Staff (2); 
KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); German Club (3); 
Alchemist Club (3); Dean’s List (1, 2). 




63 


I U X IOIIS 



HARRY RANDALL WALDRON, KAP 

NORTH CREEK, NEW YORK 
NORTH CREEK HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (i, 2, 3); Assistant Manager 
Golf (3); Band (1, 2, 3); Glee Club (1). 


HARRIS SHIPMAN WELLS, KAP 

KINGSTON, RHODE ISLAND 
STONY BROOK SCHOOL 

Cross Country (2, 3); Intramural Sports (1, 2, 
3 ) ; Glee Club ( 1, 2) . 


GEORGE WILBUR WESTIN, AY 

PROCTOR, VERMONT 
PROCTOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshman Football (Numerals); Football (2, 3); 
Hockey (1, 2, 3); Track (2); Intramural Athletics 
(1, 2, 3); Campus Business Tryout (1); Alchemist 
Club (3); German Club (1); Dean’s List (1, 2). 


I U \ IOKS 


64 


■ 



CHARLES AMASA YOUNG, KAP 

EASTON, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

DOW ACADEMY 

Winter Sports (2); Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 
3); Soph Hop Committee; Dean’s List (1). 


VICTOR ROY WILLOUGHBY, JR., S4»E 

RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY 
BLAIR ACADEMY 

Intramural Athletics (1, 2, 3); Band (1, 2); 
Black Panthers (1, 2, 3); Spanish Club (1). 


LLOYD GEORGE WILLIAMS, RAP 

FAIR HAVEN, VERMONT 
FAIR HAVEN HIGH SCHOOL 

Intramural Athletics (1); Tryout Assistant Mana- 
ger Track (2); KALEIDOSCOPE Business Tryout 
(2); Saxon i an Business Tryout (2); Glee Club (1, 
2, 3); English Club (3). 


6 S 


1 r n ions 



JOSEPHINE ESTHER ANDERSON 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 

MONTPELIER HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (i); Class Volleyball (i, 2); 

Spanish Club (1). 


HELEN CHRISTINA ARONSON, KKL 

PROCTOR, VERMONT 
PROCTOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Basketball (1); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout 

(2) ; Glee Club (2, 3); Choir (2); Choral Club 
( 1 ) ; Vice-President Student Government Association 

(3) ; French Club (1, 2, 3), Vice-President (3); 
German Club (3); Dean’s List (1). 


HELEN ELIZABETH BAKER 

CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 
3); Class Baseball (1, 2); Class Treasurer (1); 
Custodian W. A. A. (3); French Club (1, 3); Eng- 
lish Club (3); Glee Club (3); Frosh Froiic Com- 
mittee; Winter Carnival Committee (2); Dean’s 
List (2). 


1 i x ions 


66 




BARBARA HAMILTON BINKERD 

DORSET, VERMONT 
BURR AND BURTON SEMINARY 

Class Hockey (i); Class Volleyball (i, 2); Cam- 
pus Tryout (1); Assistant Business Manager Hand- 
book (3); English Club (3); French Club (1); 
German Club (3); Kellogg Latin-English Prize (2); 
Dean’s List (1, 2). 


MARGARET ELIZABETH BECRAFT 

UTICA, NEW YORK 
UTICA FREE ACADEMY 

Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3); Class Basketball (1); 
Campus Tryout (2); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout 
(2); French Club (2, 3); German Club (3). 


JEAN ELIZABETH BARTON 

NEWPORT, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY 

Class Hockey (2, 3); Class Basketball (2); Class 
Baseball (2); French Club (2, 3). 


67 


I IT x ions 



IRENE ELEANORE BON NETT, KKE 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 
1-R1ENDS SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (i, 2, 3), Captain (3), All-Midd 
(1, 2, 3); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3); Class Basket- 
ball (3). 


ELIZABETH MARTHA BUCKLIN, KKX 

RUTLAND, VERMONT 
RUTLAND HIGH SCHOOL 

Radcliflfe College ( 1 ) ; Associate Business Manager 
1936 KALEIDOSCOPE; French Club (2, 3); Dean’s 
List (2). 


HARMONY BUELL, IIB 4 > 

PLYMOUTH, CONNECTICUT 

TERRY VI LLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (1); Class Basketball (1); Class 
Volleyball (2); Associate Editor 1934 Handbook; 
German Club (1); Debating (1); Dramatics (1, 2, 
3); Glee Club (3). 


1 U X I O 1C s 


68 






ANNETTE JOSEPHINE CHAPMAN 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 
PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 

Cam [ms Tryout (i); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout 
(2); Choral Club (1); English Club (3); French 
Club (1, 3); Kellogg Latin-English Prize (2). 


DOROTHY BLAKE CHAMBERLIN 

HOUSATONIC, MASSACHUSETTS 
SEARLES HIGH SCHOOL 

Campus News Staff (2); Orchestra (1, 2, 3); 
Choral Club (1); German Club (2); Dean’s List 
(*)• 


KATHERINE DITMARS CHAFFEE 

HYANNIS, MASSACHUSETTS 

BARNSTABLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (1); Class Volleyball (3); KALEI- 
DOSCOPE Tryout (2); German Club (1); Dean’s 
List (1, 2). 


.1 r x 1 o 11 s 


- 




ELEANORE RUGGLES COBB 

BENNINGTON, VERMONT 
BENNINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (i); Class Volleyball (i, 2); Class 
Basketball (1, 2), Captain (2); Class Baseball (1, 
2); Contributing Editor Saxonian (2, 3); Debating 
(2. \): English Club (2, 3); Dean’s List (1, 2). 


EVELYN CATHERINE COMESKEY, I1B<I> 

BREWSTER, NEW YORK 
BREWSTER HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (1); Class Volleyball (2); Class 
Basketball (2); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); 
Saxonian Tryout (2); Choral Club (1); French 
Club (1, 2, 3). 


BEVALIE LOUISE CONE 

WINDSOR, VERMONT 
WINDSOR HIGH SCHOOL 

KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); Saxonian Tryout 
(2); French Club (3). 


.1 I N I » It S 




ISABEL HOPKINS DAVIES, AAA 

ROCKVILLE CENTER, NEW YORK 
SOUTH SIDE HIGH SCHOOL 

Cam- pus News Staff (2), Assistant Editor (3); 
KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); Contributing Edi- 
tor Saxonian (3); Choral Club (1); English Club 
( 3 ). 


MARY ELIZABETH DANSEREAU 

CLAREMONT, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
STEVENS HIGH SCHOOL 

Orchestra (1, 2, 3); Ensemble (1, 2, 3); A 
Tempo Club (3); Dean’s List (2). 


MARY CHRISTINE CONLEY 

SHERRILL, NEW YORK 
SHERRILL HIGH SCHOOL 

Class President (3); Dramatics (3); Glee Club 
(3); A Tempo Club (3); Choral Club (1); Secre- 
tary Student Government (3); Soph Hop Commit- 
tee. 


7i 


I U N IOIIS 



ALICE DEWEY, AHA 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 

MONTPELIER HIGH SCHOOL 

Associate Editor 1936 KALEIDOSCOPE; Drama- 
tics (3); Choral Club (1); English Club (3); 
French Club (1). 


AURETTA HANSON, AAA 

RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY 
RIDGEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 


AGNES AUGUSTA HARRIS 

STATEN ISLAND, NEW YORK 
CURTIS HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball (2, 3); Class Basketball (1, 2); 
Glee Club (3); Choral Club (1). 


j it \ ions 





JANET LUCILLE HOWE, AAA 

RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY 
RIDGEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 


MARION ARLENE HOOK, AK 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 
SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 

Assistant Business Manager Campus (3); Moun- 
tain Club Governing Board (3); Glee Club (1, 2, 
3) ; A Tempo Club (3) ; French Club ( 1 ) ; German 
Club (3). 


JANET HARTWELL 

LITTLETON, MASSACHUSETTS 
LITTLETON HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (1, 2); Class Volleyball (2); Class 
Basketball (1); German Club (1, 2). 


- 


73 


1 r n 1 o it s 




LOUISE ELIZABETH HUBBARD, AHA 

ROCHESTER, VERMONT 
ROCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball (i); W. A. A. Archery (2, 3); 
Glee Club (2, 3); Choir (2, 3); Choral Club (1); 
Orchestra (2, 3); Ensemble (2); French Club (1, 
2, 3); Dean’s List (1, 2). 


LOUISE ESTHER HUTCHINSON 

BRADFORD, VERMONT 
BRADFORD ACADEMY 

Class Hockey (1, 3); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3), 
All-Midd (1, 2); Class Basketball (1, 2); Class 
Baseball (2), All-Midd (2); KALEIDOSCOPE Try- 
out ( 2 ) ; Orchestra ( 3 ) ; A Tempo Club ( 3 ) ; French 
Club (3); Secretary W. A. A. (2). 


MAVIS CARYL JONES, I1B<I> 

ALBANY, NEW YORK 
ALBANY HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball ( 1 ) ; Assistant Business Manager 
Campus (3); Choral Club (1). 


1 v n ions 


74 




■ 



KATHARINE LOUISE KELLEY, KKT 

BELLOWS FALLS, VERMONT 
BELLOWS FALLS HIGH SCHOOL 

Class President (i); Campus Tryout (i); Pan- 
Hellenic Council (3); Debating (1, 2); Dramatics 
(2); Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Choir (1, 2, 3); French 
Club (1, 2, 3); Chairman Frosh Frolic (1); Winter 
Carnival Committee (2, 3). 


AUDREY MAY KEFFER, 1IB<1> 

RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY 
RIDGEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball (1, 2); Class Basketball (1); 
Class Baseball (2); French Club (1, 2); Spanish 
Club (3). 


DOROTHY MAE JORDAN, AAA 

RAMSEY, NEW JERSEY 
RAMSEY HIGH SCHOOL 

Dramatics (2, 3); A Tempo Club (2, 3); English 
Club (3); Dean’s List (1). 


75 


1 u x ions 



MARY JANE KEVAN 

MOUNT VERNON, NEW YORK 
MOUNT VERNON HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball (i); Class Basketball (i); French 
Club (i, 2); Debating (3); Dramatics (1, 2, 3). 


ISABEL KINNEY, IIB<I> 

COBLESKILL, NEW YORK 
COBLESKILL HIGH SCHOOL 

French Club (T, 2, 3 ) . 


MARY EILEEN LAPAN 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

MIDDLEBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

French Club (1, 3); Spanish Club (3). 


1 r x 1 o it s 


76 




MARGARET RAYNOR LEACH 

NOROTON HEIGHTS, CONNECTICUT 
DARIEN HIGH SCHOOL 

Assistant Advertising Manager Saxonian (2, 3); 
Choir ( 1, 2, 3 ) ; Glee Club ( 1, 2, 3 ) ; A Tempo Club 
( 3 ) ; German Club (2, 3 ) ; French Club ( 3 ) . 


ELIZABETH PINGREE LAWTON 

NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS 

NEWBURYPORT HIGH SCHOOL 

German Club (1, 2, 3). 


ELIZABETH LAWS, KKT 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
FRANKFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3); Class Volleyball (1, 3); 
Class Baseball (2); Campus Tryout (1); French 
Club (3); Dramatics (1, 2, 3). 


.1 r \ ions 


■ 



ROXANA ELIZABETH LEWIS 

WHITEHALL, NEW YORK 
WHITEHALL HIGH SCHOOL 

W. A. A. Archery (i); Choral Club (i); Debat- 
ing ( i ) ; Orchestra ( i, 2, 3 ) ; French Club ( 1 , 2, 3 ) , 
Treasurer (3); German Club (1, 2, 3); English 
Club (3). 


BARBARA WOOSTER LILLEY, AHA 

MARSHFIELD, VERMONT 
GODDARD SCHOOL 

Campus Tryout (1); German Club (1, 2); De- 
bating (2, 3). 


BARBARA LOUISE LYONS 

BENNINGTON, VERMONT 
BENNINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3); Class Basketball (1, 
2); Class Hockey (1); Class Secretary (3); Tryout 
Business Staff Saxouian (2); Dramatics (1, 2, 3); 
Choir (3). 


UK 


1 r x ions 


78 




ANNA MAYO 

NORTHFIELD, VERMONT 

NORTHFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

Choral Club (i); Spanish Club (2, 3). 


JANE ELIZABETH MASTERSON 

DELMAR, NEW YORK 
MILNE HIGH SCHOOL 

Campus News Staff (2); KALEIDOSCOPE Try- 
out (2); Spanish Club (2, 3). 


RUTH GERTRUDE MCNULTY, riB<I> 

HINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 
HINGHAM HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3), Captain (2), All-Midd 
(1, 2, 3); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3); Class Basket- 
ball (2); Class Baseball (1); Dramatics (3); Or- 
chestra (1, 2); Choral Club (1); French Club (1, 
2); Soph Hop Committee (2). 


79 


I IT X I O II S 




SARAH JANICE ORTON 

SALEM, NEW YORK 
WASHINGTON ACADEMY 

Elmira College (i); Photography Editor 1936 
KALEIDOSCOPE; Dramatics (3); English Club 
( 3 ). 


CORNELIA BRIDGE PHILIPS, AAA 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 
MONTPELIER HIGH SCHOOL 

Glee Club (2, 3); A Tempo Club (3); Choral 
Club (1); Spanish Club (1). 


EVELYN VIRGINIA PHILLIPS, AAA 

EAST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY 
EAST ORANGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Vice-President ( 1 ) ; Pan-Hellenic Council 
(3); Dramatics (1, 2); French Club (3). 


.1 r x ions 


80 




DOROTHY ELAINE RICH 

WESTFIELD, NEW JERSEY 

WESTFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

Hood College (i, 2); French Club (3). 


EVELYN DOROTHEA POPPEL, 11 B 4 > 

HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 
HARTFORD PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3), Captain (1); All-Midd 
Baseball (2); Class Vice-President (2); Campus 
Tryout (1); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); Stu- 
dent Government Council (2); Social Committee 

(2) ; Winter Carnival Committee (2, 3), Chairman 

( 3 ) . 


SARAH JEANETTE PLATT 

GREAT BARRINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SUARLIiS HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3), Manager (2); English 
Club (3); French Club (1, 3); Dean’s List (1, 2). 


81 


I IT N I O II S 




VIRGINIA RICH, KKF 

RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY 
RIDGEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball (i); Class President (2); Class 
Vice-President (3); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); 
Student Government Council (1); French Club (3). 


FLORENCE ELIZABETH RIVENBURGH 

POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK 
POUGHKEEPSIE HIGH SCHOOL 

Dean’s List (1, 2). 


PHYLLIS GRIGG SANDERSON 

MOOSUP, CONNECTICUT 
PLAINFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 
3); Class Basketball (1, 2); French Club (1). 


.1 IT nr I O IK s 






MELBA ALYCE SPAULDING 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

CLASSICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (2, 3); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3); 
Class Basketball (r, 2, 3); Class Treasurer (2); 
Assistant Business Manager Cam pus (3); German 
Club (1); Dean’s List ( 1 , 2). 


RUTH ELEANOR SCHAEFFER 

WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 
SAINT MARGARLT’S SCHOOL 

Glee Club (2, 3); French Club (1, 3); German 
Club (2, 3). 


JEAN SAWYER, KKT 

POMPTON LAKES, NEW JERSEY 

RIDGEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball (1); French Club (1, 3). 


I I \ IOIIS 



VELMA SMITH SUTL 1 FFE 

HEMPSTEAD, NEW YORK 

HEMPSTEAD HIGH SCHOOL 

Campus News Staff (2); Debating (1); Student 
Government Council (3); English Club (3); French 
Club (1, 3); Dean’s List (1, 2). 


DOROTHY SYMONDS 

CRANSTON, RHODE ISLAND 
SANFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (2), Manager; Class Basketball (1, 
2); French Club (1); German Club (3); Soph Hop 
Committee; Dean’s List (1, 2). 


ELIZABETH MACKENZIE TARNEY, \EA 

GOFFSTOWN, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

GOFFSTOUN HIGH SCHOOL 

English Club (3); French Club (1, 2, 3). 


♦i 1 x ions 


84 





BARBARA SYLVIA WARNER 

NEW MILFORD, CONNECTICUT 

NEW MILFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); Choral Club (1); 
French Club (2, 3); Spanish Club (3); Dean’s List 
(i, *)• 


DORIS ANNE WALL, KKP 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

NORTH HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Volleyball (1, 2); Campus Tryout (1); 
KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); Glee Club (2, 3); 
French Club (2, 3); Soph Hop Committee (2); 
Dean’s List (1, 2). 


ELIZABETH TRASK 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

CATHEDRAL SCHOOL OF ST. MARY 

Class Hockey (1); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout 
(2); Contributing Editor Saxon/an (2), Associate 
Editor (3); French Club (1); Choral Club (1); A 
Tempo Club (3); English Club (3), Secretary- 
Treasurer (3); German Club (3); Winter Carnival 
Committee (3); Third Saxoniait Poetry Contest (2); 
Second Saxonian Essay Contest (3); Dean’s List (1, 
*). 


85 


I I \ I O It s 




RUTH ESTHER WEAVER 

SEYMOUR, CONNECTICUT 
SEYMOUR HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (i, 2); Class Volleyball (1, 2, 3); 
Class Basketball (1, 2, 3) ; Class Baseball (2) ; Debat- 
ing (1); German Club (1, 2). 


CAROL ELIZABETH WHEELER, AAA 

BALDWIN, NEW YORK 
BALDWIN HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (1, 2, 3); Class Volleyball (1, 2), 
Manager (3); All-Midd Volleyball (2, 3); Campus 
Business Tryout (1); Dean’s List (2). 


FRANCES MARJORIE WILKINSON, AHA 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 
MONTPELIER HIGH SCHOOL 

Campus News Staff (2), Assistant Editor (3); 
KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil (3); German Club (1). 


I 1 N I O II S 


86 




BARBARA TROW WISH ART, TIB* 

BARRE, VERMONT 
SPAULDING HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (i, 2, 3); Class Volleyball (1, 2); 
Class Baseball (1); KALEIDOSCOPE Tryout (2); 
Pan-Hellenic Council (3); Debating (1, 2, 3), 
Manager (3); Dramatics (1, 2, 3). 


RUTHANNA WILSON, KKE 

BERW YN, PENNSYLVANIA 
SVCARTHMORE COLLEGE 

Class Hockey (2, 3), All-Midtl Hockey (3); Class 
Volleyball (2); Class Basketball (2); Class Secre- 
tary (3); Vice-President W. A. A. (3); Dean’s 
List (2). 


MARY ALBERTA WILLIAMS 

WESTMINSTER STATION, VERMONT 

BELLOWS FALLS HIGH SCHOOL 

Class Secretary (2); Can? pus News Staff (2), As- 
sistant Editor (3); German Club (1, 2, 3); Dean’s 
List ( 1, 2) . 


87 


1 r \ ions 


KATHERINE WORCESTER, AAA 

SCHENECTADY, NEVC YORK 

BROWN SCHOOL 

Class Hockey (i, 2, 3); KALEIDOSCOPE Busi- 
ness Tryout (2); French Club (3). 


I U X I O It S 


ss 



■ 



WARD MACFADYEN PHINNEY 
GRAY GOOCH MOORE WRIGHT 


C I. A s S O F F I C F It * 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


KENNETH \V. MACFADYEN 
President 

GEORGE D. PHINNEY 
Secretary 


PARMELEE C. HILL 
Vice-President 

WILLIAM C. WARD 
T re usurer 


WOMENS COLLEGE 
AT MIDDLEBURY 


MILDRED L. MOORE 
President 

JANET GRAY 
Secretary 


CONSTANCE W. GOOCH 
Vice-President 

ERMA A. WRIGHT 
T rea surer 


s o i* ii o 3i o it i: s 


s 9 


■ 


>i i i» i» l i: is it 

it v c o i. i, i: I* i: 

HAROLD LESTF.R AKLF.Y, AKE 

HARRY BLISS HARRIS, JR., AT 

READSBORO, VERMONT 

WINDSOR, VERMONT 

MARCUS WILLIAM BERMAN, KAP 

CHARLES JOHN HARVI, KAP 

PORT HENRY, NEW YORK 

LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS 

LEW IS EDW ARD BERNADINI, ARE 

SPRINGFIELD, VERMONT 

WILFRED CHARLES HEINZ, X<I>E 

MOUNT VERNON, NEW YORK 

EDGAR POWELL BERRY, AT 

PARMELEE CORWIN HILL, AT 

BAYSIDE, NEW YORK 

MOUNT VERNON, NEW YORK 

WALTER ERIC BROOKER, BK 

RANDALL WAI.RATH HOFFMANN, X* 

NEW LEBANON, NEW YORK 

MIDDLETOWN, NEW YORK 

PHILLIP GERALD BROWN, KAP 

J. TOWNSEND HOPKINS, X* 

I.YNDONVILLE, VERMONT 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

LORING DUBOIS CHASE, X'P 

ROBERT LOWELL HUTCHINSON, XT' 

RUMEORD, RHODE ISLAND 

ELMIRA, NEW YORK 

FRANCIS EUGENE CLONAN, ARE 

KENNETH VAUGHN JACKMAN, AX<I> 

MI NEVILLE, NEW YORK 

BRISTOL, VERMONT 

PIERCE GERARD COUPERUS, XT' 

JOYCE WALTER KINGSLEY, JR., KAP 

HINGHAM CENTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT 

WILLIAM GREGORY CRAIG, AT 

JEAN PLEASENT LABOUCHERE, AKE 

SALEM, NEW YORK 

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS 

JOHN FRANCIS DARROW 

POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK 

ARMAND NORBERT LAFLAMME, A2T> 

LYNDON V1LLE, VERMONT 

HERBERT T. S. ELLISON, JR., 

NEW ROCHELLE, NEW YORK 

ROBERT WARREN LEONARD, KAP 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

JEREMIAH ALOYSIUS FITZGERALD, ARE 

NORWICH, CONNECTICUT 

JOHN FRANCIS LONERGAN, ARE 

BENNINGTON, VERMONT 

PAUL WOODWARD FOSTER, RAP 

ARTHUR LAMBERT LORD, XT' 

WATERTOWN, CONNECTICUT 

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND 

EARL LAUX GILLER, AT 

RICHARD AHIRA LUCAS, XT' 

OUEENS VILLAGE, NEW' YORK 

GLOVERSV1LLE, NEW YORK 

NATHANIEL COOLEY GROBY, BK 

KENNETH WILLIAM MACFADYEN, ARE 

AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

BURTON DONALD GUILD, A2T> 

JOHN AUSTIN MACOMBER, KAP 

WATERBURY CENTER, VERMONT 

WESTPORT, MASSACHUSETTS 

FRANK WILLIS GUILD 

ROBERT BRUCE MALVERN 

WATERBURY CENTER, VERMONT 

BARRE, VERMONT 

CHARLES HARCOURT GURNETT 

FREDERIC DEAN MANCHESTER, ARE 

MELROSE, MASSACHUSETTS 

HYDE PARK, MASSACHUSETTS 

CHARLES H. HAMLIN, BK 

CHARLES CAMPBELL MAWER 

HYDE PARK, VERMONT 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 


90 


ROBERT GILLETTE MCDERMOTT, XT' 

AMITYVILLE, NEW YORK 

NELSON BAILEY MILLIGAN 

SOUTH PEACHAM, VERMONT 

ROBERT IRVING MORGAN, BK 

ALBANY, NEW YORK 

PAUL ALBERT MYERS, XT' 

BEECHHURST, NEW YORK 

RICHARD LUTTON NEILSON, AT 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM HOWARD NOLAN, KAP 

BAYONNE, NEW JERSEY 

JONATHAN MILLER PECK, AT 

WEST HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 

CONRAD ANDREW PH1L1PSON, AT 

LANESBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 

GEORGE DUDLEY PHINNEY, AKE 

MILTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

RALPH WELCH PICKARD, X‘I>E 

WATERTOWN, CONNECTICUT 

FRANK PETER PISKOR, XT' 

TURNERS FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS 

ALBERT WILLIAM POLLARD, BK 

NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

WENDELL HOLMES POWERS, 

RICHFORD, VERMONT 

ROBERT WINSLOW ROBINSON, AT 

NEWTON HIGHLANDS, MASSACHUSETTS 

CHARLES HENRY SAWYER 

LUDLOW, VERMONT 

NATHANIEL THOMPSON SCOTT, KAP 

NEWBURGH, NEW YORK 

MARSHALL SEWELL, JR. 

LAKEWOOD, NEW JERSEY 

LAURENCE WALTON SHIELDS, XT' 

BARRE, VERMONT 

LEWIS IVERSON SHIPMAN, X-J'E: 

WILTON, CONNECTICUT 

FREDERICK HOWARD SMITH, X* 

BELMONT, MASSACHUSETTS 


HENRY FOSTER SPINNEY. AT 

LITCHFIELD, CONNECTICUT 

MEREDITH HERBERT STAFFORD, BK 

SALEM, NEW YORK 

BRUCE VF.RDINE ST. JOHN, AT 

NEWBURGH, NEW YORK 

FRED LOGAN STONE, XT' 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

RICHARD PORTER TAYLOR, AT 

EAST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY 

ROBERT LLOYD THOMPSON, AKE 

JAMAICA, NEW YORK 

WENDELL ABNER TOWNE 

WILLIAM STOW N, MASSACHUSETTS 

EDWIN ALBF.R VASSER, XT' 

BENNINGTON, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

WILLIAM ROLLIN WAITE, XT' 

LUDLOW, VERMONT 

STEPHEN DAY WARD, AT 

HINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM CLARK WARD, A2T> 

BARRE, VERMONT 

ERWIN PRESCOTT WARREN, XT' 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

DOUGLAS LEROY WEATHERHEAD 

NEWTON VILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 

NORMAN LORD WENDLER, A2T» 

NORWICH, VERMONT 

GORDON EMANUEL WESTBY, X‘I>E 

LITTLETON, MASSACHUSETTS 

SYDNEY PARMENTER WHITE, KAP 

FITCHBURGH, MASSACHUSETTS 

ARTHUR EDWIN WILSON, XT' 

HACKENSACK, NEW JERSEY 

WATSON EDWARD WORDSWORTH, BK 

HOUSA TONIC, MASSACHUSETTS 

WINSTON ROBERT WORDSWORTH, BK 

HOUSATONIC, MASSACHUSETTS 

HAROLD WILSON YASINSKI, KAP 

FAIR HAVEN, VERMONT 

JAMES ANDREW ZETT, BK 

LITCHFIELD, CONNECTICUT 


91 



3V O 31 E X * S c O E E E I. E A T 31 I II II E E II I II 3 


DORCAS ANDERSON ADAMS GERTRUDE EVELYN DOLE 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT PETERBOROUGH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 


MARJORIE LEE ALLEN, AZA 

JEAN ELINOR DOUGLAS, AAA 

BARRE, MASSACHUSETTS 

LANSDOWNE, PENNSYLVANIA 

HELEN RANDLE BARNUM.AZA 

MARGARET CARRUTH DOW, 

ISTANBUL, TURKEY 

WEST HAVEN, CONNECTICUT 

LOIS MARGARET BEARDSLEE. AAA 

DORIS MIRIAM DOWNING, AZA 

SPRINGFIELD, VERMONT 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE, NEW YORK 

ELIZABETH BEEBE, *M 

CAROLINE HOWLAND ELLIOTT 

NEWPORT, VERMONT 

CLAREMONT, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

MARY LOIS BESTOR, KKT 

JANET CONNING ENNIS 

MONTCLAIR, NEW JERSEY 

AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

NANCY ELIZABETH BLANCHARD, -K 

STONEHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

MARJORIE RUTH FIELDEN 

WORCESTER, MASSAC H USETTS 

CARL BLOOM, IIB* 

RAMONA FORD 

NEWTON CENTRE, MASSACHUSETTS 

ORANGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

FRANCES ROCKWELL BRAINERD, KKT 

RUTH STEVENS FURNESS, *M 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

RARITAN, NEW JERSEY 

CATHERINE FORBES BRANCH 

MARION GEORGE GERLING, 

WILLI M ANTIC, CONNECTICUT 

SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK 

JANETTE MARY BRAUMULLER, -K 

CONSTANCE WEBSTER GOOCH, K KT 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

MARJORIE MACLEAN BULKELEY 

JANET GRAY, TIB* 

RHINEBECK, NEW YORK 

KATONAH, NEW YORK 

GLADYS LILLIA CALDRONEY 

RIDGEFIELD PARK, NEW JERSEY 

BARBARA JANE GREGORY, AAA 

WAUKESHA, WISCONSIN 

CHARLOTTE ROOT COLBURN 

RUTLAND, VERMONT 

JESSAMINE HALE, AAA 

BOUND BROOK, NEW JERSEY 

HARRIET COLEY, K Iv V 

ISABEL CAROLINE HANDY 

WEST BOYLSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

BRAINTREE, MASSACHUSETTS 

GRAYCE ELIZABETH COOKSON, 2K 

MARY CORNWALL HASTINGS 

WATER BURY, CONNECTICUT 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

MARGHERITA MARIE COSENZA, HIM* 

SUSAN LYMAN HATHAWAY, I IB* 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE, NEW YORK 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

CAROLYN JANET COZZIO 

DORIS ELIZABETH HEALD, 2K 

PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

WOBURN, MASSACHUSETTS 

ALICE MINERVA CROSBY 

MIRIAM RUTH HODGES, KK T 

EAST DUMMERSTON, VERMONT 

OZONE PARK. NEW YORK 

DORIS KATRINE CUTTING 

MARGARET EDITH HOPE 

BARRE, MASSACHUSETTS 

MOOS UP, CONNECTICUT 

HELEN BAILEY DAWSON, -K 

ELIZABETH ANN HUNT, KK T 

NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK 

NORTH HILLS, PENNSYLVANIA 

92 



ISABEL AYER INGHAM, HIM* 

SOPHIE THERESA SAFIN 

NEW BRITAIN, CONNECTICUT 

WILLIM ANTIC, CONNECTICUT 

MURIEL KATHRYN JONES, ‘EM 

MARGARET WILLIAMS SCHERHOLZ, AZA 

WORCE ST E R , M ASSAC H U SETTS 

EAST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY 

MAXINE MARY JOSLYN 

RUTH ELIZABETH SCHNEIDER, 'EM 

WAITSFIELD, VERMONT 

WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 

ELIZABETH BETE KNOX, K K F 

HELEN ELIZABETH SHEA 

TAUNTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

HELEN MILDRED KUECHEL 

BEULAH MAE SHEPARD, 'EM 

ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

MARY EVELYN LANCE 

HILDA LILLIAN SIMONDS, AZA 

VERGE NNES, VERMONT 

BRANDON, VERMONT 

BEATRICE MARGARET LINDGREN 

FRANCES BRADFORD SMITH 

AUBURN, MASSACHUSETTS 

AUBURN, MAINE 

ELIZABETH VANARTSDALEN MacARTHUR 

HARRIET INGRAM SPAULDING, -K 

HIGHTSTOWN, NEW JERSEY 

KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

EDNA MARIE MASKELL, AZA 

KATHERINE REUTER STACKEL, -K 

LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

DOROTHEA RUTH MATHISON, -K 

MARY LOUISA TAYLOR 

MAPLEWOOD, NEW JERSEY 

BARRE, MASSACHUSETTS 

HELEN ALICE MILLER, 'EM 

MILDRED TRASK, KKF 

SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

ELEANOR GRACE MILLIGAN, AAA 

CATHERINE MARIE VAN BLARCOM 

SOUTH ORANGE, NEW JERSEY 

PASSAIC, NEW JERSEY 

MILDRED LOUISE MOORE 

RUTH FARQUHAR VAN SICKLE, HB<f> 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

MARION AGNES PERKINS, AAA 

MURIEL ANNE VOTER, I1B<E 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

JEAN ELIZABETH PORTER 

JESSIE BARBARA WEAVER 

TURNERS FAI LS, MASSACHUSETTS 

NEW MILIORD, CONNECTICUT 

JOY AGNES RAHR, 

EILEEN ESTHER WHITNEY 

GLENS FALLS, NEW YORK 

SALISBURY, VERMONT 

RUBY ARLENE REEVE 

RUTH ELEANOR WICKWARE, AZA 

AQUEBOGUE, NEW YORK 

MADISON, NEW JERSEY 

NATALIE RITA ROGERS 

MARJORIE JEAN WILCOX, AZA 

CABOT, VERMONT 

RANDOLPH, VERMONT 

DORIS ISABEL RYAN, AAA 

MARION ELAINE WISEIART, HB«E 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

BARRE, VERMONT 

LOUISE HORGAN RYAN, AAA 

ERMA ARDELLE WRIGHT 

ALBANY, NEW YORK 

ATHOL, MASSACHUSETTS 


9 3 



BOEHM PALMER BAKER HALLOCK 
ABBOTT COSENZA CI.ARKE KINGSLEY 


« IASS o I ¥ I e E It S 

MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


PHILLIPS PALMER 
President 

ROBERT J. BOEHM 
Secretary 


EDWARD C. HALLOCK 
Vice-President 

WINFIELD H. BAKER 
T rea surer 


WOMEN’S COLLEGE 
AT MIDDLEBURY 


JEAN C. CLARKE 
President 


REBECCA H. ABBOTT 
Secretary 


HELENE G. COSENZA 
Vice-President 

JANE W. KINGSLEY 
T reasurer 


f ii i: s ii 3i i: \ 


94 


>i i ii ii l i; ii i ii v 


4 O I. L K i; K 


EVERETT SLOCUM ALLEN, -<£E 

VINEYARD HAVEN, MASSACHUSETTS 

GEORGE AARON ANDERSON, KAP 

WASHINGTON DEPOT, CONNECTICUT 

ROLAND WERNER ANDERSON, AS* 

RENSSELAERVILLE, NEW YORK 

WILLIAM HENRY ARNONE, AKE 

BROCKTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

HERBERT EDWARD AVERY 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 

THOMAS FRANCIS BAKER, X* 

ALBANY, NEW YORK 

WINFIELD HOWLAND BAKER, BK 

MECHA NICVIl.LE, NEW YORK 

ARTHUR LIVINGSTON BARNEY, X* 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

ALLISON STANLEY BEEBE, AX* 

INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 

HERMAN NATHANIEL BENNER. BK 

ROCKLAND, MASSACHUSETTS 

ROBERT JAMES BOEHM, AKE 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

WILFRED BLANCHARD BORLAND, 2*E 

WALDEN, NEW YORK 

RAYMOND FISKE BRAINARD, JR., BK 

MAHWAH, NEW JERSEY 

CHARLES THOMAS BRANDT 

QUEENS VILLAGE, NEW YORK 

BRUCE MCCLAVE BROWN, BK 

UPPER N YACK, NEW YORK 

WILBUR MARSHALL BROWN, X*E 

LITTLETON, MASSACHUSETTS 

BERNARD HENRY BRUSSEAU, AKE 

BROCKTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

IVAN LEE BUNNELL, AX* 

WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 

PAUL GORDON BUSKEY, AT 

FITCHBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 

ROBERT EDWARD CAIRNS, BK 


9 


FREDERICK DfFOREST CAMP 

WATERTOWN, CONNECTICUT 

NELSON MITCHELL CAMP, X'P 

WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 

RALPH CAMPAGNA, KAP 

LARCHMONT, NEW YORK 

JOHN CHALMERS, AT 

FITCHBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 

CARLOS BUCKLIN COOK, 2$E 

DALLAS, TEXAS 

JOHN EDWARD CRIDLAND 

JOHNSTOWN, NEW YORK 

EDWARD DANIEL CUMMINGS, X* 

WEST SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

ASA LEETE ELLIOTT 

CLAREMONT, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

RAYMOND MAURICE FAIRBROTHER, AX* 

WEST BURKE, VERMONT 

GEORGE EDWARD FARRELL, JR., AKE 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

WILLIAM MORGAN FULKERSON 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

EDWARD HASKIN GARTLAND, AT 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

ARTHUR DONALD GILBERT, X*E 

NIAGARA FALLS, NEW' YORK 

MAURICE DUDLEY GOUR, AX* 

LYNDON CENTER, VERMONT 

NORMAN HARRY GRAY, KAP 

DARIEN, CONNECTICUT 

PAUL BENJAMIN GUARNACCIA, KAP 

WAKEFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

EDWARD CHARLES HALLOCK, KAP 

ELIZABETH, NEW' JERSEY 

RICHARD AYLESWORTH HARD, BK 

ARLINGTON, VERMONT 

CARROLL LAWRENCE HASSELTINE, AX* 

BRISTOL, VERMONT 

DONALD EDWIN HAYWARD, BK 


DERBY LINE, VERMONT 


RANDOLPH, VERMONT 



EDWARD BEARDSLEY HAYW ARD, 2<I>E 

RUTLAND, VERMONT 

EMORY AMOS HF.BARD, Blv 

NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

ROBERT BALDW IN HICKS, 2<PE 

GRANVILLE, NEW YORK 

FRANK EMERY HOBSON 

WEST NEWBURY, MASSACHUSETTS 

KARL LEWIS HOFMANN 

MORIAH CENTER, NEW YORK 

MARION JOHN HUNT, 2*E 

JAMAICA, NEW YORK 

WERNER PETER ICKSTADT 

PA TC HOGUE, NEW YORK 

ROBERT SCOTT JEWETT, KAP 

REDWOOD, NEW YORK 

ROLAND ALFRED JOHNSON, KAP 

WASHINGTON DEPOT, CONNECTICUT 

JOHN DIETRICH KAMPS 

NORTH FIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

NELSON COGGINS KEABLES 

BEACON, NEW YORK 

JACK CUTLER KE1R 

WINDSOR, VERMONT 

DEANE FREDERICK KENT, A2<P 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

GEORGE WILBUR LAMB, A24> 

WATERBURY, VERMONT 

LEWIS ROBERT LAWRENCE, 2$E 

WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK 

JAMES ADAMS LEACH, X'P 

NEWTON CENTRE, MASSACHUSETTS 

ROBERT ROBINSON LEACH 

FAIRFAX, VERMONT 

HAROLD WALTER LEWIS 

KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

CECIL CARL LILJENSTEIN, KAP 

NEW' LONDON, CONNECTICUT 


EDGAR SHERBURNE LOVELL, AKE 

BRATTLE BORO, VERMONT 

SIDNEY BERNARD LUR1A 

WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 

BERT FRANKLIN MACFADDEN, AT 

KINGSTON, NEW YORK 

MELVIN WHITLOCK MCKENNEY, AKE 

WELLESLEY HILLS, MASSACHUSETTS 

ROBERT JOHNSON MONTGOMERY 
MATTESON, 2<I>E 

BENNINGTON, VERMONT 

HF.RVEY WINTHROP MEAD, A24> 

BAKERSFIELD, VERMONT 

JAMES ALFRED MINER, X'P 

YONKERS, NEW' YORK 

WILLIAM MARSHALL MOREAU, X'P 

HOLMDEL, NEW JERSEY 

WILLIAM DANIEL MUNDELL 

SOUTH NEWFANE, VERMONT 

IRVING NATHANSON 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

GRAHAM STILES NEWELL 

ST. JOHNSBURY, VERMONT 

RUSSELL ACKLEY NORTON, KAP 

TOLEDO, OHIO 

RAYMOND O’CONNOR, AT 

SALEM, MASSACHUSETTS 

JOHN HENRY OTTEMILLER 

YORK, PENNSYLVANIA 

PHILLIPS PALMER, A2<& 

WEST BRATTLEBORO, VERMONT 

CHARLES WORDEN PATTISON, A24> 

W'ESTPORT, NEW YORK 

BRUCE BARROWS PEACH, AT 

NORTH FIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 


MILTON KUHLTHAU LINS, AKE 

MILLTOWN, NEW’ JERSEY 


96 


CHARLES SMITH POWELL, AT 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


STANFORD CHADWICK PRATT, XSP 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

MAHLON JAY PRICE, BK 

CANADENSIS, PENNSYLVANIA 

CLARENCE ALBERT PRITCHARD, BK 

PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

CHARLES IRVING RAND, AT 

HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 

ALBERT JOSEPH RICCIO, BK 

RYE, NEW YORK 

ALFRED RICCIO, BK 

RYE, NEW YORK 

RICHARD MAXWELL RICE, BK 

WAPPINGERS I ALLS, NEW YORK 

HENRY MELVEN RICHARDSON, KAP 

FONDA, NEW YORK 

CLIFFORD STUART ROBERTSON, BK 

NORTH HUDSON, NEW YORK 

JOHN CORNELIUS ROBINSON, -‘FK 

FLUSHING, NEW YORK 

RICHARD COLLIN ROSE, 2<FE 

EDGEWA TER, NEW JERSEY 

ROBERT ARNOLD ROWE, -<FF: 

RUTLAND, VERMONT 

JOHN HOLDEN ROWELL, BK 

CHARLEMONT, MASSACHUSETTS 

STEPHEN WILLIAM SCOTT 

NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK 

RICHARD JAMES SHEEHY 

GLENS FALLS, NEW YORK 

JOHN ROBERT SMITH, AT 

PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

RICHARD CUTLER SOULE, KAP 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT 


NORMAN RAY STEARNS, AE4» 

WATERBURY, VERMONT 

RAEBURN BRACKETT STILES, A 24* 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

JOHN BERRY STODDARD, XT' 

RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY 

EUGENE STREIM 

LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK 

THOMAS WILBUR SWAN, XT' 

MIDDLETOWN, NEW YORK 

DONALD JEWETT SWETT, AKE 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

FREDERICK WILBUR TAYLOR, BK 

DERBY, VERMONT 

DAVID W'AYNE TEMPLE, AT 

RUTLAND, VERMONT 

WILLIAM THOMAS W'ATT, KAP 

NEWBURGH, NEW YORK 

HENRY WILSON WEMPLE, 

FULTON VILLE, NEW YORK 

DONALD HERBERT WESTIN, AT 

PROCTOR, VERMONT 

ARTHUR DELIVERANCE WHEELER, JR. 

WHITJNCHAM, VERMONT 

JOHN RATHBONE WILLIAMS, KAP 

FAIR HAVEN, VERMONT 

ROBERT LLOYD WILSON, AT 

SWARTHMORE, PENNSYLVANIA 

DONALD JENSEN WILTSIE 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

FIELD HOWARD WINSLOW, KAP 

WEST RUTLAND, VERMONT 

WILLIAM HENRY WOODWARD, AX<I> 

CEDAR GROVE, NEW JERSEY 

W ALTER ROY YOUNG 

ST. JOHNSBURY CENTER, VERMONT 


97 


w O .>1 K \ * S c O I. I. K ii !•: A T >1 I II II I. K It | It V 


JANE FORBES ABBOTT 

WINNIFRED MARSHALL DUFFIELD, KKT 

WILTON, NF.W HAMPSHIRE 

WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK 

REBECCA HARDISON ABBOTT 

DOROTHY ELIZABETH DUNBAR, II 

ASHLAND, MASSACHUSETTS 

WESTFIELD, NEW JERSEY 

ANNA KATHERINE ALLEN 

JEAN BORST DUSENBURY 

PROCTOR, VERMONT 

PORT CHESTER, NF.W YORK 

JEAN BARBARA ARCHIBALD 

MADGE AGNES EDDY 

AI BA N V, NEW YORK 

SOUTH ROYAI.TON, VERMONT 

MARJORY CLARK ARNOLD, AAA 

DORIS MURIEL FIFE 

BROAD BROOK, CONNECTICUT 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

ALICE JEANETTE BAKER, AZA 

VIRGINIA LUPTON FISCHER, -K 

GRANBY, MASSACHUSETTS 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

EMILY MILLER BARCLAY 

RUTH ELIZABETH FLICKER, <LM 

RIVERTON, NEW' JERSEY 

KINGSTON, NF.W YORK 

ELEANOR EDDY BARNUM, AZA 

CATHERINE ELIZABETH FLINT 

ISTANBUL, TURKEY 

NEW PORT, VERMONT 

ALICE MARIE BASSETT 

ELIZABETH CHARLOTTE GALVIN 

SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 

SALISBURY, VERMONT 

ETHEL HUBBARD BRAINERD, KIvT 

MARGARET GARDNER, <t>M 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

SARANAC LAKE, NEW YORK 

ARNE LOUISE BULKELEY 

ELIZABETH NUTTING GATES, TTB<I> 

RHINEBECK, NEW YORK 

ENOSBURG FALLS, VERMONT 

MADELINE SYBIL BUTTLES 

BRANDON, VERMONT 

JOYCE LOUISE GODLEY, <*>M 

TENAFLY, NEW JERSEY 

ELEANOR MARY CARROLL 

BEULAH HANNAH HAGADORN 

RHINEBECK, NEW YORK 

ALBANY, NEW YORK 

JEAN COLLINS CLARKE, KKT 

VALERIA EMILY HALLIGAN, AAA 

JACKSON, MICHIGAN 

NEW' YORK, NEW YORK 

BARBARA CONVERSE, AZA 

F.LIN ELIZABETH HANDYSIDE, AZA 

BRAINTREE, MASSACHUSETTS 

EAST LONGMEADOW, MASSACHUSETTS 

HELENE GIANNINA COSENZA, II 

SHIRLEY ELIZABETH HAVEN 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE, NEW YORK 

VERGENNES, VERMONT 

PHYLLISS GRETTA DOW 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

MARY JOYCE HECKMAN, I IB* 

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT 

MARGARET ELIZABETH DRINKWATER, 

NAOMI MAY HEIG 

BRAINTREE, MASSACHUSETTS 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

EDITH KING DUBOIS 

MARIAN WALRATH HF.WF.S 

ROSELLE PARK, NEW JERSEY 

BEACON, NEW YORK 

RUTH BROUGHTON DUFFIELD, KKT 

WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK 

JEAN HOADLEY 

BRANFORD, CONNECTICUT 


9 » 


VIRGINIA PARMELEE HOWE. 

WILMINGTON, VERMONT 


ELIZABETH ESTHER OSBORNE, nB«t> 

POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK 


LOUISE HOYT, HITE 

FLORENCE ADALYN OVERTON, 

BETHEL, CONNECTICUT 

SOUTHBURY, CONNECTICUT 

ARLENE MARGARET HUBBARD, AZA 

JENNIE-BELLE PERRY, KKT 

MORRISVILLE, VERMONT 

WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK 

FLORENCE MARGARET HULME, KKT 

CATHERINE HARKNESS PROUTY. AAA 

WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

HELEN VICTORIA JORDAN, AZA 

JAMAICA, NEW YORK 

JANET ELIZABETH RANDALL 

NEW ROCHELLE, NEW YORK 

HELEN CONTENT KELLEY, KKT 

ELIZABETH MAE REYNOLDS, AZ_i 

BELLOW'S FALLS, VERMONT 

DANBURY, CONNECTICUT 

ANNE LOUISE KILBRIDE, -K 

FRANCES MARY RUSSELL 

WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 

SCHENECTADY, NEW' YORK 

JANE WHYTOCK KINGSLEY, IXB^ 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

ANNE FRANCES SARGENT, AAA 

BROAD BROOK, CONNECTICUT 

MARGARET ADELAIDE LAWRENCE 

KATHERINE MARIE SEVERANCE 

GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

OAKDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

JEANETTE LOUISE LEAVENS 

MOUNT VERNON, NEW YORK 

BETTY GERTRUDE SHARLEY 

PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

MARGARET LESLIE, AAA 

RUTH SHELDON 

W YCKOFF, NEW JERSEY 

GREENWICH, NEW YORK 

RUTH EMMA LEWIS, -K 

DOROTHY ELIZABETH SIMONDS 

HUDSON FALLS, NEW' YORK 

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 

JANE LIDDLE, AAA 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 

ROBERTA MARGARET STAFFORD 

MORRISVILLE, VERMONT 

ELIZABETH ISABELLE MACCULLOCH 

MONICA LOUGH STEVENS 

ALBANY, NEW' YORK 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

PHYLLIS SCHUYLER MALCOLM, AAA 

BERTHA ELIZABETH STRAIT 

MILFORD, CONNECTICUT 

HYDE PARK, NEW YORK 

JOSEPHINE MARIAM MINDER, 

NORTH CREEK, NEW YORK 

ANNETTE CAROLYN TUTHILL, AAA 

MATTCTUCK , NEW YORK 

LILLIAN LORRAINE MOW ATT, MB* 

JEAN LOUISE WALKER 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

NEWTON VILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 

EVA ELLA NILES 

ELIZABETH WILSON WARNER 

HAMBURG, NEW YORK 

NORRISTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 

CLARIBF.L MAY NOTHNAGLE, KKT 

KATHERINE CAL.DERWOOD WHITTIER, 

STRATI ORD, CONNECTICUT 

BROOKLYN, NEW' YORK 


99 





Chi Psi. . . .Delta Kappa Epsi- 
lon. . . .Delta Upsilon. . . .Kappa 
Delta Rho. . . .Alpha Sigma Phi 
. . . .Beta Kappa. . . .Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. . . .Pi Beta Phi. . . .Sigma 
Kappa. . . .Delta Delta Delta. . . . 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. . . .Alpha 
Xi Delta. . . .Phi Mu. . . .Phi Beta 
Kappa. . . .Kappa Phi Kappa. 


A T 


I II 


i: ii \ 


i r i i: s 


DELTA 


DELTA KAPPA EPSILON ALPHA SIGMA PHI 


UPSILON KAPPA DELTA KHO BETA KAPPA 


SIGMA PHI EPSILON CHI PSI 







REILLY GODDARD MACLEAN SHEA SPRINGSTEAD 
MEACHAM LA EORC.E BROWN EMMONS WOODMAN 


OFFICERS 


HENRY T. EMMONS ’35 

President 

MEMBERS 

ROBERT H. BROWN ’36 
Secretary-T reasurer 


ALPHA SIGMA PHI 


ANTHONY J. COSTALDO *35 

BETA KAPPA 

RALPH H. MEACHAM ’36 

FRANK LOMBARDY ’33 

CHI PSI 

CECIL B. GODDARD ’36 

CHARLES H. WOODMAN ’33 

DELTA KAPPA EPSILON 

DOUGLAS F. REILLY ’36 

OTTO W. PROCHAZKA ’33 

DELTA UPSILON 

HENRY F. MACLEAN ’36 

ROBERT T. STAFFORD ’33 

KAPPA DELTA RHO 

VICTOR M. BREEN ’36 

ARNOLD R. LAFORCE *35 

SIGMA PHI EPSILON 

ROBERT H. BROWN ’36 

HENRY T. EMMONS ’35 


J. REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD ’3 6 

The Interfraternity Council 

administers all problems of relationship between the 


men’s social fraternities. It consists of two members from each house, a senior and a 
junior. 

The council’s main responsibility is regulation of rushing. It lays down rules, 
administers and enforces them. This year no substantial change was made from the 
regulations of the preceding year. It was voted to continue the policy of deferred 
pledging, of having a visiting period preceding house entertainment, and of circulating 
copies of rushing rules among the freshmen. 

A fraternity scholarship cup was established by the council this fall. It is to be 
awarded at the end of each semester to the house having the highest general scholastic 
average during the preceding term. In cooperation with the alumni, the council was 
again co-donor of a cup given for the best house decoration during home-coming 
week-end. 

I > T i: IK F IS A T K IK \ I T V C O I A < I I. 


102 






Vi'ISHART HHALD KELLEY PHILLIPS JONES 
ARNOLD HANCHETT CANFIELD HARRIS GIBSON WHITTIER 


GRACE M. HARRIS ’35 
President 


OFFICERS 


E. DOROTHY CANFIELD *35 

JESSIE M. GIBSON ’35 

GRACE M. HARRIS ’35 

MARGARET T. WHITTIER ’35 

FAITH ARNOLD ’35 

MARGERY T. HANCHETT ’35 


MEMBERS 

ALPHA XI DELTA 

DELTA DELTA DELTA 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

PHI MU 

PI BETA PHI 

SIGMA KAPPA 


F.. DOROTHY CANFIELD ’35 
Secretary-T reasurcr 


FRANCES M. WILKINSON ’36 

E. VIRGINIA PHILLIPS ’36 

KATHARINE L. KELLEY ’36 

MURIEL K. JONES ’37 

BARBARA T. WISHART ’36 

DORIS E. HEALD ’37 


ALUMNAE REPRESENTATIVES 


MISS MATILDA. A. ROMEO 
Alpha Xi Delta 

MRS. ROBERT CARTMELL 
Delta Delta Delta 
MRS. REGINALD L. COOK 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 


MRS. RICHARD PAUL 
Phi Mu 

MRS. H. WRIGHT CASWELL 
Pi Beta Phi 
MRS. NELL ADAMS 
Sigma Kappa 


The object of the Pan-Hellenic Association is to regulate all matters of common 
interest and to promote friendly relationship between the six sororities at Middlebury. 
The body has jurisdiction over rushing and pledging rules and also helps to promote 
a high social and scholastic standard. A new plan of mid-semester rushing, which 
proved very successful, was introduced this year. 

The association is made up of one junior, one senior, and one alumnae representa- 
tive from each sorority. 


I» A > - II i: I. I. i: V I i 


A S S O Cl A T I o > 


103 


c 


II I I* S I 

FOUNDED 1841 


A I. I» Ifl A >1 I 


ESTABLISHED 1 843 




ROSS CUMMINGS LUCAS SMITH CHASE BAKER HUTCHINSON GOVE MINER DEEDMAN MYERS 
WARREN VASSAR WILSON BRYANT STONE REILLY STODDARD HOPKINS WAITE HUBBARD 
STARTUP CARON O’NEILL GRUGGEL WHITNEY SEELYE WOODMAN MC DERMOTT EASLER. 
PRATT PISKOR CAMP MOREAU SWAN BARNEY SHIELDS 


ERNEST C. HR Y ANT 


FRATER IN FACULTATE 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

1935 

CARL A. GRUGGEL, JR. RAYMOND L. WHITNEY 

JOHN SCHOONMAKER CHARLES H. WOODMAN, JR. 

LAURENS C. SEELYE 


1936 

ROBERT B. BRYANT 
JOHN B. A. CARON, JR. 

CHARLES A. DEEDMAN, JR. 

DONALD W. EASLER 
EARL M. GOVE, JR. 

RICHARD C. HUBBARD 

1937 

LORING D. CHASE 
PIERCE G. COUPERUS 
RANDALL W. HOFFMANN 
J. TOWNSEND HOPKINS 
ROBERT L. HUTCHINSON 
ARTHUR L. LORD 
RICHARD A. LUCAS 
PAUL A. MYERS 

1938 

THOMAS F. BAKER 
ARTHUR L. BARNEY 
NELSON M. CAMP 
EDWARD D. CUMMINGS 
JAMES A. LEACH 


ROBERT G. MCDERMOTT 
BERNARD J. O’NEILL 
DOUGLAS F. REILLY 
RICHARD E. ROSS 
CHARLES H. STARTUP 


FRANK P. PISKOR 
LAURENCE W. SHIELDS 
FREDERICK H. SMITH 
FRED L. STONE 
EDWIN A. VASSER 
WILLIAM R. WAITE 
ERWIN P. WARREN 
ARTHUR E. WILSON 


JAMES A. MINER 
WILLIAM M. MOREAU 
STANFORD C. PRATT 
JOHN B. STODDARD 
THOMAS W. SWAN 


105 


II i: L T A K A P I* A E P S 1 I. O > 

FOUNDED I 844 


A I. »» II A A I. I* II A 


ESTABLISHED I 8 54 




11 



LOXERGAN MACFADYEN THOMPSON I ORBUSH F. CLONAN M. CLONAN LABOUC.HERE ARNONE FITZGERALD 

PHINNEY 

HI RNARDINI AKLEY DAWES BOYCE SWETT MARTIN HOXIE K1RWIN MACLEAN 
GOLEMBESKE NIMS HOLMES PROCHAZK A RUDD W. BOEHM WILLIAMS BARKER BARRETT SWEFT 
FARRELL IRISH R. BOEHM LOVELL MANCHESTER BRUSSEAU 


FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

CHARLES A. ADAMS H. GODDARD OWEN 

WALTER J. NELSON 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

1935 

ROGER M. BAKEY 
HARRY S. BARKER 
GERALD O. BARRETT 
WALTER E. BOEHM 
FRANCIS J. DONAHUE 

1936 

FRANK S. BOYCE 
M. PIERCE CLONAN 
J. WILLIAM DAWES 
RICHARD O. FORBUSH 
ANTHONY GOLEMBESKE 
EL WOOD A. HOXIE 


BURTON C. HOLMES 
WILLIAM A. HUNTER 
PEMBROKE L. NIMS 
OTTO W. PROCHAZKA 
ARTHUR H. WILLIAMS 


HERBERT F. IRISH, JR. 
HENRY H. KIR WIN 
HENRY F. MACLEAN 
JOHN H. MARTIN 
MALCOLM M. SWF.TT 


HAROLD L. AKLEY 
LEWIS E. BERNARDINI 
FRANCIS E. CLONAN 
JEREMIAH A. FITZGERALD 
JEAN P. LABOUCHERE 


1937 

JOHN F. LONERGAN 
KENNETH W. MACFADYEN 
FREDRIC D. MANCHESTER 
G. DUDLEY PHINNEY 
ROBERT L. THOMPSON 


1938 

WILLIAM H. ARNONE 
ROBERT J. BOEHM 
BERNARD H. BRUSSEAU 
GEORGE E. FARRELL, JR. 


MILTON K. LINS 
EDGAR S. LOVELL 
MELVIN W. MCKENNEY 
DONALD J. SWETT 


107 




J 


i» i: i. 


T A I I* S I I. O \ 


FOUNDED 1834 


>1 1 i» i» 1. i<: 11 r 11 v <' 11 a 1* t 1: 11 


ESTABLISHED I 8 $6 


■ 




ishr _'*f UL'jJnfr flM 

Ifct f . M3Er ffl-j 


(Jf5i 

JHL 


JR ¥a 



PECK HILL BERRY TAYLOR PIERCE HARRIS ROBERTS ROBINSON NEILSON MAC FADDEN 
HOLMES CRAIG PHII IPSON POWELL ST. JOHN SHEA BROOKS WILSON WARD SPINNEY GARTI.AND 
W. WESTIN CADY JANAS STAFFORD COLLINS KOTOWSKI WILLIAMS PICKENS BREEN 
BUSKEY PEACH CHALMERS SMITH RAND TEMPLE D. WESTIN 


FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

RICHARD L. BROWN JOSEPH S. THOMAS 

FRANK W. CADY PERLEY C. VOTER 

W. STORRS LEE 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

1935 

DONALD S. BROWN 
DAVID O. COLLINS 
FRANK S. JANAS 
MATTHEW J. KOTOWSKI 


1936 

VICTOR M. BREEN 
ANGUS M. BROOKS 
HOWARD S. CADY 
C. JOHN HOLMES 
LAWRENCE F. LF.F.TE 

1937 

EDGAR P. BERRY 
WILLIAM G. CRAIG 
EARL L. GILLER 
PAR MELEE C. HILL 
RICHARD L. NEILSON 
RAYMOND O’CONNER 
JONATHAN M. PECK 

1938 

PAUL G. BUSKEY 
JOHN CHALMERS 
EDWARD H. GARTLAND 
JACK C. KF.IR 
BERT F. MACFADDEN 
BRUCE B. PEACH 


HILLES R. PICKENS 
ROBERT T. STAFFORD 
RICHARD L. WILLIAMS 


JOHN C. PIERCE 
JAMES E. ROBERTS 
DOUGLAS C. RUBB 
HAMILTON SHEA 
G. WILBUR WESTIN 


CONRAD A. PHILIPSON 
ROBERT W. ROBINSON 
HENRY F. SPINNEY 
BRUCE V. ST. JOHN 
RICHARD P. TAYLOR 
STEPHEN D. WARD 


C. IRVING RAND 
J. ROBERT SMITH 
DAVID W. TEMPLE 
DONALD H. WESTIN 
ROBERT L. WILSON 


109 


It II o 


K A I* I* A 


II i: L T A 


FOUNDED 1905 


A I. I» II A 1 II A I* T i: II 

ESTABLISHED 1905 



l I 0 



FINIGAN GREEN HALL DF.MING HOF.HN AVERY H. YASINSK! WINSLOW ANDERSON WHITE GROSS 

CUARNACCIA JEWETT SCOTT 

HARVI L. G. WILLIAMS FOSTER KUSTER P. BROWN NOLAN HOWARD CHASE WELLS FISHER NEWTON GRAY 

KINGSLEY HOYT 

CONKLIN YOUNG NASH W. YASINSKI MANCHESTER R. BROWN MATHEWSON CUSHING LAFORCE 
DEMPEWOLFF BROCK CARTER LEONARD 

SOULE L. W. WILLIAMS CAMPAGNA H ALLOC K WATT JOHNSON LILJENSTEIN NORTON MACOMBER BERMAN 


REGINALD L. COOK 


PRATER IN FACULTATE 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 


JAMES S. BROCK 
RICHARD W. CUSHING 
MYRON S. EMBLFR, JR 
CHARLES A. KUSTER 
ARNOLD R. LAFORCE 


1935 


ARNOLD R. MANCHESTER 
PHILIP H. MATHEWSON 
DALE B. PRITCHARD 
WILLIAM A. YASINSKI 


. *936 

JOHN M. AVERY, JR. 

ROBERT H. BROWN 
WILLIAM H. CARTER, JR. 

A. RICHARD CHASE 
CLIFFORD T. CONKLIN, JR. 

GEORGE H. DEMING 
RICHARD F. DEMPEWOLFF 
WILLIAM H. FINIGAN 
EDWIN R. FISHER 
FOSTER C. GREENE 
MALCOLM E. CROSS 


DOUGLAS T. HALL 
CONRAD HOEHN 
EDWIN A. HOWARD 
GORDON E. HOYT 
JOHN E. NASH 
PETER S. NEWTON 
HARRY R. WALDRON 
HARRIS S. WELLS 
LLOYD G. WILLIAMS 
CHARLES A. YOUNG 


1937 

MARCUS W. BERMAN 
PHILLIP G. BROWN 
PAUL W. FOSTER 
CHARLES I. HARVI 
JOYCE W. KINGSLEY, |R. 

ROBERT W. LEONARD 


JOHN A. MACOMBER 
WILLIAM LI. NOLAN 
NATHANIEL T. SCOTT 
SIDNEY P. WHITE 
HAROLD W. YASINSKI 


GEORG 1 A. ANDERSON 
RALPH CAMPAGNA 
NORMAN H. GRAY 
PAUL B. GUARNACCIA 
EDWARD C. HALLOCK 
ROBERT S. JEWETT 
ROLAND A. IOHNSON 


CECIL C. LILJENSTEIN 
RUSSELL A. NORTON 
HENRY M. RICHARDSON 
RICHARD C. SOULE 
WILLIAM T. WATT 
JOHN R. WILLIAMS 
FIELD H.‘ WINSLOW 


I I I 



FOUNDED 1845 


A I. I’ >1 A II K I. T A 


ESTABLISHED 1925 



FAIR BROTHER GOUR STILES KENT PALMER LAMB STEARNS WEMPLE WENDLLR 
WOODWARD BUNNELL BEEBE HASSELTINE MAC DOUGALL LA 1 I.AMME PATTISON POWERS ANDERSON 
MEAD TIERNEY COSTALDO BONA HUNT RUMPI- WARD JACKMAN M EACH AM 


F.DGAR J. WILEY 


FRATER IN FACULTATE 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 


LESTER H. BENSON 
RUDOLPH V. BONA 


1935 


ANTHONY J. COSTALDO 
LELAND O. HUNT 


1 936 


DONALD J. MACDOUGALL 
RALPH H. MEACHAM 


BERNARD D. RUMPF 
MARTIN J. TIERNEY 


1 937 


BURTON D. GUILD 
CARROLL L. HASSELTINE 
KENNETH V. JACKMAN 
ARMAND N. LAFLAMME 


WENDELL H. POWERS 
WILLIAM C. WARD 
NORMAN L. WENDLER 


1938 


ROLAND W. ANDERSON 
ALLISON S. BEEBE 
IVAN L. BUNNELL 
RAYMOND M. FAIRBROTHER 
MAURICE D. GOUR 
RAYMOND HERBERT 
DEANE F. KENT 
GEORGE W. LAMB 


HERVEY W. MEAD 
PHILLIPS PALMER 
CHARLES W. PATTISON 
NORMAN R. STEARNS 
RAEBURN B. STILES 
WILLIAM H. WOODWARD 
HENRY W. WEMPLE 


1 1 3 




■ 



HEBARD HARD BRAINARD CAIRNS GROBY POLLARD W. R. WORDSWORTH ZETT TAYLOR 
W. E. WORDSWORTH RICE HAMLIN STAFFORD BROOKER ROBERTSON BROW N BENNER HAYWOOD 
MORGAN C. GODDARD HILL H. GODDARD CADY HILLER WAGGONER BRAUNW'ARTH PRITCHARD 

PRICE BAKER RICCIO ROWELL 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 


1935 

FRANCIS H. CADY HYATT H. WAGGONER 

FRANK LOMBARDY 


1936 


ROBERT J. BRAUNWARTH 
CECIL B. GODDARD 
HERBERT M. GODDARD 
CLARENCE W. HARWOOD 


CLEMENT S. HILL 
ROBERT C. HILLER 
FRANK J. RUGGERI 


WALTER E. BROOKER 
NATHANIEL C. GROBY 
CHARLES H. HAMLIN 
RICHARD A. HARD 
ROBERT I. MORGAN 


1937 


ALBERT W. POLLARD 
WATSON E. WORDSWORTH 
WINSTON R. WORDSWORTH 
JAMES. A. ZETT 


1938 


WINFIELD H. BAKER 
HERMAN N. BENNER 
RAYMOND F. BRAINARD. JR. 
BRUCE M. BROWN 
ROBERT E. CAIRNS 
DONALD E. HAYWARD 
EMORY A. HEBARD 
MAHLON J. PRICE 


C. ALBERT PRITCHARD 
ALBERT J. RICCIO 
ALFRED RICCIO 
RICHARD M. RICE 
CLIFFORD S. ROBERTSON 
JOHN H. ROWELL 
FREDERICK W. TAYLOR 




1 1 5 


. 





GILBERT SHIPMAN ELLISON HICKS COOK PICKARD HAYWARD 
ROWE BROWN DANIELS LAWRENCE BORLAND SPR1NGSTEAD HUNT 
CLARK SMITH JACKSON ELLIS EMMONS DORGAN NORTON 
HEINZ WESTBY ROBINSON ROSE 


ALLEN MATTESON 
SANBORN WILLOUGHBY 
HAINES MILES 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 


1 93 5 


RUSSELL A. CLARK, JR. 
ELLIOTT H. DORGAN 
HENRY T. EMMONS 
LESTER H. EVANS 
ELLIS K. HAINES 


JOSEPH H. JACKSON 
DONALD \V. MILES 
RUSSELL C. NORTON 
W. WYMAN SMITH, JR. 


GEORGE H. DANIELS 
EVERETT F. ELLIS 
VICTOR N. SANBORN 


1936 

J. REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD 
ARCHIBALD C. TILFORD 
VICTOR R. WILLOUGHBY, JR. 


1937 

HERBERT T. S. ELLISON, JR. LEWIS I. SHIPMAN 

WILFRED C. HEINZ GORDON E. WESTBY 

RALPH W. PICKARD 


1938 


EVERETT S. ALLEN 
WILFRED B. BORLAND 
WILBUR M. BROWN 
CARLOS B. COOK 
ARTHUR D. GILBERT 
EDWARD B. HAYWARD 
ROBERT B. HICKS 


M. JOHN HUNT 
L. ROBERT LAWRENCE 
ROBERT J. M. MATTESON 
JOHN C. ROBINSON 
RICHARD C. ROSE 
ROBERT A. ROWE 


117 


r i 


it i: t a 


i» ii i 


FOUNDED 1867 


V E It >1 O .> T A 


ESTABLISHED 1893 


!» II A 



1 1 8 




MC NUITY HATHAWAY HOYT VAN SICKLE INGHAM VOTER KINGSLEY HECKMAN OSBORNE MOWATT 

H. COSENZA 

M. WISHART BLOOM R. COSENZA J. GRAY BUELL JONES POPPEL MACK DUNBAR KINNEY KEEFER 
FULTON RUSSELL FLAGG B. WISHART HILLER COMFSKEY ARNOLD HALPIN KNOX D. GRAY 


SORORES IN COI.LEGIO 


FAITH ARNOLD 
ALICE E. FLAGG 
LOUISE H. FULTON 
DOROTHY GRAY 
ELIZABETH FIALPIN 


1935 

DORIS L. HILLER 
JOSEPHINE KNOX 
LOIS MACK 
MARION W. RUSSELL 


1936 


HARMONY BUELL 
EVELYN C. COMESKEY 
MAVIS C. JONES 
AUDREY M. KEFFER 


ISABEL KINNEY 
RUTH G. MCNULTY 
EVELYN D. POPPEL 
BARBARA T. WISH ART 


1937 


CAROL BLOOM 
MARGHERITA M. COSENZA 
JANET GRAY 
SUSAN L. HATHAWAY 


ISABEL A. INGHAM 
RUTH F. VANSICKLE 
MURIEL A. VOTER 
MARION E. WISH ART 


1938 


HELENE G. COSENZA 
DOROTHY E. DUNBAR 
ELIZABETH N. GATES 
MARY J. HECKMAN 


LOUISE HOYT 
JANE W. KINGSLEY 
LILLIAN L. MOWATT 
ELIZABETH E. OSBORNE 


■ 


I 19 


S I i, >1 A K A I* I* A 

FOUNDKD 1874 




\ r c Ifl A I* T 1; II 

ESTABLISHED 19H 



120 


■ 



FLEIG ANDERSON HAVEN V. FISCHER BLANCHARD STARK DUNSMOOR BRAUMULLER 
DAWSON HEALD R. DAMERELL A. FISCHER SMITH LEWIS KILBRIDE MATHISON 
COOKE E. DAMERELL HANCHETT COOKSON MCCANN HOOK SPAULDING STACKFL 


DORIS G. ANDERSON 
ALICE E. COOKE 
ESTHER F. DAMERELL 
RUTH W. DAMERELL 
NATALIE H. DUNSMOOR 
AVIS E. FISCHER 


SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

1935 


LOUISE G. FLEIG 
MARGERY T. HANCHETT 
MARJORIE MCCANN 
MIRIAM E. SMITH 
ANNE K. STARK 


1936 


MARION A. HOOK 


1937 

NANCY E. BLANCHARD 
JANETTE M. BRAUMULLF.R 
GRAYCE E. COOKSON 
HELEN B. DAWSON 


DORIS E. HEALD 
DOROTHEA R. MATHISON 
HARRIET I. SPAULDING 
KATHERINE R. STACKEL 


1938 


VIRGINIA L. FISCHER 
SHIRLEY E. HAVEN 


ANNE L. KILBRIDE 
RUTH E. LEWIS 


1 2 l 


■ 




i» i: i. t a 


II i: L T A 


II i: L T A 


FOUNDED 1888 


A I. I* II A I O T A 

ESTABLISHED 1917 



I 22 



■ 



HOWE PERKINS PROUTY BEARDSI.EE 1.. RYAN D. RYAN MALCOLM MILLIGAN 
DOUGLAS ARNOLD TUTHILL LESLIE DAVIES WORCESTER C. PHILIPS LIDDLE SARGENT 
LAMSON JORDAN HANSON GIBSON CLARK WHF.ELl-R V. PHILLIPS GREGORY HALLIGAN 


SOROR IN FACULTATE 


MISS ELLEN E. WILEY 


SORORES IN COLLEGIO 


*935 

MARY E. CLARK FRANCES A. LAMSON 

JESSIE M. GIBSON 


ISABEL H. DAVIES 
AURETTA I. HANSON 
JANET L. HOWE 
DOROTHY M. JORDAN 


1936 

CORNELIA B. PHILIPS 
E. VIRGINIA PHILLIPS 
CAROL E. WHEELER 
KATHERINE W ORCESTER 


1937 


LOIS M. BEARDSLEE 
JEAN E. DOUGLAS 
BARBARA J. GREGORY 
JESSAMINE HALE 


ELEANOR G. MILLIGAN 
MARION A. PERKINS 
DORIS I. RYAN 
LOUISE H. RYAN 


193S 


MARJORIE ARNOLD 
VALERIA E. HALLIGAN 
MARGARET LESLIE 
JANE LIDDLE 


PHYLLIS S. MALCOLM 
CATHERINE H. PROUTY 
ANNE F. SARGENT 
ANNETTE C. TUTHILL 




12 3 


> 


K A I* I* A 


k A I* I* A 


FOUNDED 1870 


a a m >1 a 


4. A .>1 >1 A I. A >1 It l» A 


ESTABLISHED 1923 


■ 



R. DUFFIELD H. COI.EY PERRY HOOCES ARONSON NOTHNAGLE W. DUFFIFLD KNOX GOOCH BESTOR 
HULME TRASK LAWS H. KELLEY WALL HUNT WILSON CLARK BUCKLIN BRAINERD 
SAWYER RICH K. KELLEY HARRIS YOUNG E. COLEY DAVIS BRYAN BON NETT 


SOROR IN FACULTATE 

MISS ELEANOR S. ROSS 


SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

1935 


ELIZABETH J. BRYAN 
ELIZABETH COLEY 
ALMA H. DAVIS 


GRACE M. HARRIS 
MARJORIE YOUNG 


1 936 


HELEN C ARONSON 
IRENE E. BONNETT 
M. ELIZABETH BUCKLIN 
KATHARINE L. KELLEY 
ELIZABETH LAWS 


VIRGINIA RICH 
JEAN SAWYER 
DORIS A. WALL 
RUTHANNA WILSON 


1937 

M. LOIS BESTOR ELLIZABETH ANN HUNT 

HARRIET COLEY ELIZABETH B. KNOX 

MIRIAM R. HODGES MILDRED TRASK 


193 8 

FLORENCE M. HULME 
HELEN C. KELLEY 
CLARIBEL NOTHNAGLE 
JENNIE-BELLE PERRY 


ETHEL H. BRAINERD 
JEAN C. CLARKE 
RUTH B. DUFFIELD 
WINIFRED M. DUFFIELD 


■ 


s 



A I. I* II A A I II E I T A 


FOUNDED 1893 


A I. I» II A I* I 


ESTABLISHED 1925 



■ 



A. HUBBARD THURBER E. MASKELL PARSONS WICK WARE R. ALLEN WILCOX M. ALLEN 
DOWNING HANDYSIDE HINCKS D. MASKELL SIMONDS CONVERSE H. JORDAN D. JORDAN BAKER 
JOHNSON ROBERTS TARNEY CANFIELD TUCKER L. HUBBARD WILKINSON SCHERHOLZ LILLEY 


SORORES IN COLLEGIO 


ROSAMOND ALLEN 
E. DOROTHY CANFIELD 
ELEANOR M. DUKE 
MARY E. HINCKS 
ESTHER JOHNSON 


1935 


M. ELIZABETH JORDAN 
DOROTHY MASKELL 
HELEN F. PARSONS 
LUCY ROBERTS 
DORIS P. TUCKER 


ALICE DEWEY 
LOUISE E. HUBBARD 
BARBARA W. LILLEY 


1936 


ELIZABETH M. TARNEY 
FRANCES M. WILKINSON 


MARJORIE L. ALLEN 
HELEN R. BARNUM 
DORIS M. DOWNING 
EDNA M. MASKELL 


1 9 3 7 

MARGARET W. SCHERHOLZ 
HILDA L. SIMONDS 
RUTH E. WICKWARE 
JEAN WILCOX 


JEANNETTE BAKER 
ELEANOR E. BARNUM 
BARBARA CONVERSE 
ELIN E. HANDYSIDE 


1938 


ARLENE M. HUBBARD 
HELEN V. JORDAN 
ELIZABETH M. REYNOLDS 
NORMA E. THURBER 


. 




r ii i 3i i 


FOUNDED 1852 


BETA I. A M II II A 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



128 



SCHNF.IDHR GODLEY SHEPARD K. WHITTIER OVERTON GARDNER 
DRINKWATFR LOOMIS BEEBE HOWE MILLER FURNESS FLICKER 
BATES DOW LYON M. WHITTIER BOURNE TONES GERLINC 




SORORES IN COLLEGIO 


1935 

GRACE E. BATES 
ROBERTA E. BOURNE 
ELEANOR GOODRICH 


ELIZABETH H. LOOMIS 
PATIENCE LYON 
MARGARET T. W HITTIER 


1 937 


ELIZABETH BEEBE 
MARGARET C. DOW/ 
RUTH S. FURNESS 
MARION G. GERLING 
MURIEL K. JONES 


HELEN A. MILLER 
JOY A. RAHR 
RUTH E. SCHNEIDER 
BEULAH M. SHEPARD 


1938 


MARGARET E. DRINKWATFR 
RUTH E. FLICKER 
MARGARET GARDNER 
JOYCE L. GODLEY 


VIRGINIA P. HOWE 
JOSEPHINE M. MINDER 
FLORENCE A. OVERTON 
KATHERINE C. WHITTIER 


129 




OFFICERS 



WILLIAM S. BURR AG L 
President 

RAYMOND H. WHITE 
Secretary 


STEPHEN A. FREEMAN 
Vice-President 

LLEWELLYN R. PERKINS 
T rcasurer 


RESIDENT MEMBERS 


CHARLES A. ADAMS 
BLOSSOM P. BRYANT 
ERNEST C BRYANT 
ALICE H. BURRAGE 
WILLIAM S. BURRAGE 
FRANK W. CADY 
INEZ C. COOK 
ALFRED M. DAME 
STEPHEN A. FREEMAN 
ELIZABETH B. HARRINGTON 
VERNON C. HARRINGTON 


CLARA B. KNAPP 
WILLIAM W. MCGILTON 
PAUL L). MOODY 
H. GODDARD OWEN 
LLEWELLYN R. PERKINS 
ELEANOR S. ROSS 
EVERETT SKILLINGS 
EDNA A. WHITE 
RAYMOND H. WHITE 
PRUDA H. WILEY 
CHARLES B. WRIGHT 


1934 


CHARLES N. DUBOIS 
JAMES B. FISH 
KENNETH S. GOODYEAR 
THOMAS R. NOONAN 
VINCENT F. SARGENT 
AARON A. SCHEFKIND 
EDITH DOUGLASS 


NELDA A. FILIPPONE 
LOVJNA A. FOOTE 
MARY P. HALL 
ELEANOR P. ORDE 
MATILDA A. ROMEO 
CLARA W. WHITE 
DOROTHY M. WUNNER 


1935 


BENJAMIN M. HAYWARD 
JOSEPFI H. JACKSON 
FAITH ARNOLD 
GRACE E. BATES 
DOROTHY M. CROWE 
DOROTHEA DE CFIIARA 


VIRGINIA E. EASLER 
ALICE E. FLAGG 
ELIZABETH W. HIGGINS 
HELEN L. LINDBERG 
DORIS P. TUCKER 


l» II I II I] T A K A l» I* A 


* 3 ° 



WESTBY BLAKE SMITH JACKSON 
MANCHESTER ELLIOTT LA F ORCE CARTER 



OFFICERS 

ARNOLD R. LAFORCE ’35 ARNOLD R. MANCHESTER ’35 

President Vice-President 

GEORGE A. ELLIOTT ’35 CHESTER E. BILLINGTON ’35 

Secretary Social Chairman 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

CHARLES A. ADAMS EDGAR J. WILEY 

FRANK E. HOWARD 


CHESTER E. BILLINGTON 
JOHN H. BLAKE 
GEORGE A. ELLIOTT 
BURTON C. HOLMES 


WILLIAM H. CARTER 
M. PIERCE CLONAN 
HERBERT M. GODDARD 


HARRY B. HARRIS 
ROBERT L. HUTCHINSON 
RICHARD A. LUCAS 
FRANK P. PISKOR 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
1935 


1936 

1937 


JOSEPH H. JACKSON 
ARNOLD R. LAFORCE 
ARNOLD R. MANCHESTER 
ROBERT T. STAFFORD 


ROBERT C. HILLER 
HENRY H. KIR WIN 
VICTOR N. SANBORN 


FREDERICK H. SMITH 
BRUCE V. ST. JOHN 
GORDON E. WESTBY 


Mu of Kappa Phi Kappa, professional educational fraternity, was chartered at Mid- 
dlebury in 1925. The purpose of the society is to promote the cause of education by 
encouraging men to engage in the study of its principles and problems. 

Membership is limited to those who have taken at least two courses in the education 
department and who intend to teach. Speeches by faculty members and informal dis- 
cussions are featured at the meetings. 


k a r r a v 11 1 

131 


K A P P 


V 


r ublications. .Adminis- 

trative Bodies. . . .Honorary 
Societies. . . .Musical Organ- 
izations. . . .Student Activities 
. . . .Language Clubs. 


O K <• 



I 





DEMPE WOLFF MILLIGAN REILLY MASKELL ORTON BARNL'M 
CARTER BUCKLIN' BOYCE STEELE DEWEY CONKLIN* 


BOARD 


JACK STEELE ’36 
Editor-nt-Chicf 

ALICE DEWEY ’36 
Associate Editor 

WILLIAM H. CARTER ’36 
Managing Editor 

RICHARD F. DEM PL WOLFF ’36 
Art Editor 

S. JANICE ORTON ’36 
Photography Editor 


FRANK S. BOYCE ’36 
Business Manager 

ELIZABETH M. BUCKI.IN ’36 
Associate Manager 

CLIFFORD T. CONKLIN, JR. ’36 
Advertising Manager 

DOUGLAS F. REILLY ’36 
Photography Editor 


ASSISTANT EDITORS 

ROBERT W. LEONARD ’37 HELEN R, BARNUM ’37 

JAMES A. ZETT ’37 ELEANOR G. MILLIGAN ’37 

ASSISTANT MANAGER 

EDNA M. MASKELL ’37 

The 1936 KALEIDOSCOPE is the first edition of the Middlebury annual to be 
published by a board representing the entire college rather than the junior class. Under 
a new constitution adopted last year, members of the freshman class tryout for posi- 
tions on the board, sophomores hold assistantships, and juniors head the various depart- 
ments. The limited size of the board with increased responsibility resting on individual 
members has proved a very definite help in the production of the yearbook. 

The editors of the 1936 KALEIDOSCOPE have attempted to modernize the 
composition of the book, largely through radical changes in the layout of type and 
pictures used in the various sections. Through an enlarged pictorial opening section, 
composed of sixteen pages, an attempt has been made to reproduce the outstanding 
aspects of the environment of the college. General organization plans used in recent 
volumes of the KALEIDOSCOPE have been followed this year. 


K A I. i: 11)0 S « O I* I! 


133 




OTTO V*. PROCHAZKA, JR. 


BURTON C. HOLMES 



The first Caw pus, known as the Under graduate, made its appearance in July of 
1830. It appeared twice each month with the stated purpose of "treating only with 
those subjects which pertain to literature/* The project was financed by a group of 
young men who, though ambitious enough, were forced to discontinue their endeavor 
at the end of the year. 

It was forty-five years before the publication appeared again, this time under the 
editorship of William W. Gay ’76. It broadened its policy to include more of the 
happenings in the college itself in an effort to "renew the interest of alumni in the 
doings of those who had taken their places.’* It was issued monthly in a sixteen page 
edition and survived until 1899. 

After several years of inactivity the magazine came out again under the present 
name of Middlebury Campus. It appeared quarterly under the guidance of Prof. 
Charles B. Wright and for the first time gave over its columns mostly to the printing 
of college news. It was the hope of the publishers to cover every field of college 
activity and thereby keep in closer union the alumni, faculty and undergraduates. In 
1913 the magazine was altered to appear bi-weekly as a four column, four page news- 
paper. In 1922 another column was added with the paper being published weekly, and 
in 1927 it assumed its present form with the addition of an insert. 

The board of the Campus is divided into an editorial and a business staff. Students 
trying out for positions begin work in their freshman year. Elections are held after 
the tryouts have been given ample opportunity to show their ability through both com- 
petitive assignments and examinations. Members of the sophomore class are elected to 
the assistant positions with the departmental heads being chosen from the junior class. 

The entire field of student activities and interests is covered with space being 
reserved for communications, literary criticisms, and reviews of other publications, 
dramatic presentations and lectures. 

The editorial policy of the Campus has this year been interested primarily in national 
affairs, economics, and world peace. It has advocated a production for consumption 
plan whereby the unemployed would be placed in contact with idle factories and 
machines to produce goods for their own consumption. It has supported as well the 
Association of College Editors’ peace poll. 

In campus affairs it has advocated the pass-fail system of marking, campaigned 
for the improvement of the Saxonian, favored a general election day for balloting for 
student officers, and continued last year’s campaign for the establishment of an honor 
system for extra-curricular activities. 


c a >1 1* r s 


34 



■ 



J. HOLMES HEINZ SPR1NGSTEAD STEELE 
CONKLIN WILLIAMS HOOK WILKINSON NJMS 
DAVIES COLEY B. HOLMES PROCHAZKA CHAT FEE SPAULDING 


BOARD 


OTTO W. PROCHAZKA, JR. ’35 
Edit or -in-Chief 

FRANCES M. CHAFFEE ’35 
Women's Editor 

JACK STEELE ’36 
Managing Editor 

J. REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD ’36 
Sports Editor 


BURTON C. HOLMES *35 
Business Manager 

ELIZABETH COLEY ’35 
Associate Manager 

PEMBROKE L. NIMS *35 

Advertising Manager 

MIRIAM E. SMITH ’35 

Associate Adiertising Manager 




ASSISTANT EDITORS 

WILFRED C. HEINZ *37 FRANCES M. WILKINSON ’3 6 

ISABEL H. DAVIES *36 MARY A. WILLIAMS ’3 6 

ASSISTANT MANAGERS 

HOWARD S. CADY ’3 6 MARION A. HOOK ’36 

CLIFFORD T. CONKLIN, JR. 36 MAVIS C. JONES ’3 6 

C. JOHN HOLMES ’36 MELBA A. SPAULDING ’36 

NEWS STAFF 

RALPH W. PICKARD ’37 ISABEL C. HANDY ’37 

MARSHALL SEWELL, JR. ’37 EDNA M. MASKELL ’37 

HARRIET COLEY ’37 


V A M P V s 


135 



CHAPMAN TRASK COBB MACK 
BOWLES HOLMES HIGGINS ALLBi E 


EDITORIAL STAFF 


ELIZABETH W. HIGGINS ’35 
Ed it or -Ill-Chief 

MARIETTE R. BOWLES ’35 
Associate Editor 

ELIZABETH TRASK ’36 
Associate Editor 

PROF. REGINALD L. COOK 
Faculty Advisor 


MARY G. BALLARD '35 
Art Editor 

CHARLES J. HARVI ’37 
Assistant Art Editor 

BRUCE V. ST. JOHN *37 
Exchange Editor 


CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 


HYATT H. WAGGONER *33 
RAYMOND O’CONNOR ’37 
FRANCES E. BOUTON ’35 


ANNETTE J. CHAPMAN ’3 6 
ELEANORF. R. COBB ’36 
ISABEL H. DAVIES ’36 


BUSINESS STAFF 


BURTON C. HOLMES ’33 
Business Manager 

LEWIS G. ALLBEE ’36 

Assistant Business Manager 


LOIS MACK ’35 

Advertising Manager 

MARGARET R. LEACH ’36 

Assistant Advertising Manager 


The Saxonian , founded in 1921 under the auspices of the English Club, is the 
literary magazine of the college. It is a student publication and is issued six times 
a year. 

Material published in the Saxonian includes short stories, essays, poetry, and literary 
criticism chosen by the editorial board from student contributions. In addition to 
this, the Saxonian holds three contests each year in which there are prizes given for the 
three best short stories, essays and poems. A group of faculty members serves as the 
committee of judges for these contests. 

The editorial board is elected annually and is composed of those students who have 
shown literary ability by having at least three contributions published in the magazine. 
The board is assisted by a member of the faculty who serves as an advisor. Election 
to the business staff is based on a system of tryout work. 


136 


S A V O X I A \ 




KIRWIN BINKLRO BUELL CARTER 


BOARD 


WILLIAM H. CARTER ’36 
Editor -in -Chief 

HARMONY BUELL ’36 
Associate Editor 


HENRY H. KIRWIN ’36 
Business Manager 

BARBARA H. BINKERD ’36 
Associate Manager 


The Handbook is an annual joint publication of the Student Council and the 
Student Government Association. The book provides orientation information for the 
freshman class and as a result is popularly known as "The Freshman Bible.” Dis- 
tribution is made, however, to every student in college since upperclassmen, as well as 
freshmen, benefit from its publication. 

The manual contains information pertaining to college life and activities. A wel- 
come to the incoming class from the President of the college forms a suitable introduc- 
tion to the Handbook. Middlebury history and traditions, college songs and cheers, 
and the various prizes and awards made during the past year are included in the con- 
tents. The numerous organizations and extra-curricular activities of the college with 
names of the presiding ofHcers are also listed. 

Rules and regulations of the college and the rules governing fraternity and sorority 
rushing are set forth. The constitutions of the Undergraduate Association, Student 
Council, Athletic Council, Student Government Association, and Women’s Athletic 
Association are presented in complete form. The Handbook also contains the names of 
all members of the administration and faculty and the location of their othces. 

Contributions from the Undergraduate Association, Student Government Associa- 
tion, and Women’s Athletic Association together with the income from advertisements 
by local merchants make possible the publication and wide distribution of the manual. 


II A \ II It O O k 


37 




BOEHM DEAN HAZELTINE 
F.AS1.ER PROFESSOR BARNEY DEAN ROSS 


MEMBERS 


PROF. RAYMOND L. BARNEY 
Chairman 

DEAN ELEANOR S. ROSS 


DEAN BURT A. HAZELTINE 
WALTER E. BOEHM ’35 
VIRGINIA E. EASLER ’35 


The Student Life Committee directs and controls the entire social program of the 
college. It is composed of a member of the faculty, appointed by the President, the 
Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, the president of the Undergraduate Association 
and the president of the Student Government Association. 

As the college is located in a rural village where there are few public amusements, 
students are obliged to furnish all of the necessary diversions from their scholastic 
schedule. The social side is provided by the numerous gymnasium informals, fra- 
ternity house parties and formal dances. Extra-curricular activities supply the other 
portion of the program, Middlebury having more organizations in proportion to the 
size of its student body than any other New England college. Since the college has 
so many activities the Student Life Committee fulfills an important need. Its pur- 
pose is to guide the social and extra-curricular program of the college. It has the 
power to enforce all regulations issued by the Undergraduate Association and the Stu- 
dent Government Association. Permission for holding all social activities and regula- 
tions guiding them are issued by this body. Athletic schedules, student publications, 
debates, dramatic productions, glee club trips and other activities of extra-curricular 
organizations must be sanctioned by this committee. Finally, either the creation or 
dissolution of any campus organization must be approved by this group. The com- 
mittee is composed of both faculty and student representatives to secure an impartial 
viewpoint on all questions considered. 

During the past year the Student Life Committee recommended the abolition of 
Tau Kappa Alpha, national honorary forensic society, and Pi Delta Epsilon, national 
honorary journalistic fraternity, finding no justification for their official existence on 
the campus. 


I I] 


STUD E X T E I 
< O >1 31 I T T E E 


38 


■ 



HOXIE PALMER MATHEW SON 
WILLIAMS BOEHM PROCHAZKA 


OFFICERS 


WALTER E. BOEHM ’35 
Chairman 


EL WOOD A. HOXIE ’36 
Secretary 


MEMBERS 


ARNOLD R. LAFORCE ’35 
PHILIP H. MATHEWSON ’35 
OTTO W. PROCHAZKA, JR. ’35 


RICHARD L. WILLIAMS ’35 
KENNETH W. MACFADYEN ’37 
PHILLIPS PALMER ’38 


The Student Council serves as the executive agent of the Undergraduate Associa- 
tion. It has the power to supervise the policies and activities of all organizations in 
the men’s college and the individual actions of all undergraduate men. 

Since its reorganization in the spring of 1929, the Council has been composed of 
the class presidents of the men’s college; the presidents of Blue Key, Waubanakee, and 
"M” Club; and a representative from college publications. This membership brings 
together a representative group of college leaders. The president of the Undergraduate 
Association automatically becomes chairman of the Council. 

It is through the Student Council that the Undergraduate Association carries out 
its control over extra-curricular activities. The purposes of all new organizations 
must be reviewed by the Council, and unless its approval is given, the proposed societies 
cannot be established. Decisions of the Council are executed by the president of the 
Undergraduate Association. The body’s power extends only so far as it does not 
interfere with regulations of the college or the Student Government Association. 

The Student Council has the very important right of making recommendations 
concerning problems which arise in the men’s college and, upon the approval of the 
Undergraduate Association, of discussing the effect of the proposed regulations with 
the president of the college. 

At a meeting held, January 9, the Council instituted several important changes in 
the college regulations. The purchase of "M” sweaters, a transaction which formerly 
was performed by the president of the "M” Club, was placed under the supervision of 
the Dean of Men and the Director of Athletics. The Dean was also given control over 
all finances of gymnasium informals. A definite remuneration for janitor service and 
ticket selling was made compulsory. 


X T U II E X T 


r O U \ ( I E 


■ 


139 


MATHEWSON WILLIAMS BOEHM PROCHAZKA 


OFFICERS 


WALTER E. BOEHM ’33 
President 

RICHARD L. WILLIAMS ’35 
Secretary 


OTTO W'. PROCHAZKA, JR. ’35 
Vice-President 

PHILIP H. MATHEWSON '35 

T reasnrer 


The need of a student governmental unit to regulate all undergraduate activities in 
the men’s college is provided for by the Undergraduate Association. Since the early 
years of the college’s existence, there has always been such an organization to serve as 
a forum for the formulation of student opinion and to provide a means by which the 
entire undergraduate body can exert control over individuals and independent groups. 
From time to time there have been changes in the constitution of the Association 
which is now conducted according to a set of rules adopted in the spring of 1929. 

Every undergraduate man at Middlebury is automatically a member of the Asso- 
ciation and dues are collected as a part of the college fees. Meetings are called by the 
president of the Association, the Student Council, or by petition of two-fifths of the 
members. The president is elected at a general meeting held early in May when a list 
of nominees, drawn up by a committee consisting of a senior from each fraternity and 
the neutral body, is voted upon. The remaining othcers are chosen in the fall by the 
Student Council from its own members. 

The Undergraduate Association has jurisdiction over all student activities in the 
men’s college. This control is legislative in nature and the interests and wishes of the 
Association are put into effect by its executive bodies, the Student Council and the 
Athletic Council. Each extra-curricular group is required to file a statement of its 
aims with the Association’s oflicers and new organizations must meet their approval 
before they can be established. It may also make recommendations to the administra- 
tion on matters concerning the college curriculum or management. 


IT nr l» 1: It i, II A II 1 A T 1: 

A S S O r I A T I o \ 


140 




GRAY MOORE OSBORNE LITTLEFIELD COLEY 
SUTLIFFE ARONSON EASLER CONLEY BAILEY 



OFFICERS 


VIRGINIA E. EASLER ’35 
President 


HELEN C. ARONSON ’36 
Vice-President 

M. CHRISTINE CONLEY ’36 
Secretary 

COUNCIL 

ELIZABETH B. BAILEY ’35 

T reasnrer 

PATRICIA LITTLEFIELD ’35 

Se n io r R ep resen t at i re 


VELMA S. SUTLIFFE ’36 

J it n io r Represent at it e 

JANET GRAY *37 

So pho m 0 re R ep resc vt alive 


ELIZABETH E. OSBORNE ’38 
F res h man Rep res en tat ire 

ELIZABETH COLEY ’35 

House Chairman 


MILDRED L. MOORE ’37 
House Chairman 


The Student Government Association of the women’s college is a self-governing 
body, composed of all members! of the college. It controls the conduct of all women 
in matters of college life which are not under the direct jurisdiction of the faculty. 

The purposes of the organization are to encourage responsibility in the student 
body, to foster the spirit of loyalty among its members, and to maintain high social 
standards in the college. 

The legislative power is vested in the Association as a whole; the executive power 
being in the hands of a council made up of the officers, two representatives of the 
house chairmen, and one representative elected by each class. Meetings are held at 
the discretion of the council and at least six times during the college year. 

The Student Government Association sponsors the after dinner coffee hour on 
Sunday afternoons and also brings many interesting lecturers to Middlebury. 


s t i i» i: \ T 


4 1 


ii O V E II .X M E X T 
A S S O (' I A T I O X 



EMMONS LATORCE BOEHM 


MEMBERS 


ARNOLD R. LAFORCE WALTER E. BOEHM 

President Vice-President 

HENRY T. EMMONS 
Secrefary-T rcasurer 


Membership in Waubanakee is the highest recognition members of the senior class 
can receive for distinguished service to Middlebury in the field of extra-curricular 
activities. Only those men are chosen who have given the best of their time and 
ability to the activities of the college, and who have shown most clearly their qualities 
of leadership and character in undergraduate life. 

In contrast to Blue Key, which combines both honorary and functional duties, 
Waubanakee exists solely for the purpose of recognizing achievement in leading col- 
lege activities. The selectness of the organization is shown by the fact that for the 
past two years the group has been composed of only three members, although the num- 
ber to be elected is entirely at the discretion of the retiring members. 

Waubanakee was founded in 19 11 and is self-perpetuating, the graduating seniors 
each spring electing new members for the succeeding year from the junior class. The 
pledging or tapping ceremony takes place during the early part of junior week, usually 
preceding the baseball game on Porter Feld. Members wear a gold charm in the shape 
of a tomahawk, the insignia of the organization, and a black felt hat embroidered with 
the same device. 


W A U || A > A k E E 


1 4 2 





LINDBERG TUCKER EASLER DUKE HANCHETT 
CHAFFEE ARNOLD CANFIELD FISCHER HIGGINS 


OFFICERS 


E. DOROTHY CANFIELD ’35 
President 

FAITH ARNOLD ’35 
T rea surer 

ELIZABETH W. HIGGINS ’35 
Editor 


AVIS E. FISCHER ’3 s 
Vice-President 

FRANCES M. CHAFFEE ’33 
Secretary 


MEMBERS 


ELEANOR M. DUKE ’35 
VIRGINIA E. EASLF.R ’33 
MARGERY T. HANCHETT *35 


HELEN L. LINDBERG ’35 
DORIS P. TUCKER ’3 5 


The Banshee chapter of Mortar Board, national honorary women’s society, had its 
inception at Middlebury when it replaced, in 1928, the local organization known as 
the Banshees. Its membership, which is restricted to twelve, includes those senior 
women who are most representative of the college in their service, scholarship, and 
leadership. The members of this organization cooperate with the Dean of Women in 
promoting a greater interest in college activities. 

This year’s service program included an investigation of the large number of organi- 
zations in the college, a problem demanding serious consideration. It has brought to 
the women’s college several eminent speakers and has arranged for exhibits of artistic 
work. The last year has been marked by Mortar Board’s sponsoring of a much needed 
program in vocational guidance, introducing at Middlebury Miss Florence Jackson, 
vocational guidance advisor and member of the personnel bureau of Wellesley college. 
A shelf has been reserved in the new recreation room for information pertaining to 
occupational fields. 

Early in October of each year Mortar Board conducts a mountain day for fresh- 
man women, and a similar event for seniors in the spring. The Mortar Board cup is 
presented annually, by the members of the chapter, to the sophomore woman who has 
shown greatest interest in the college through participation in extra-curricular activities 
and by high attainment in scholarship. 


>1 O II T A II 


IK O A IK |» 


'43 


w 



LAFORCE HUNT HOXIE CIONAN BENSON MACLEAN ZAWISTOSKI MEACHAM 
WHITNEY EMMONS PROCHA/KA BOEHM WILLIAMS BARKER HOEHN SWEET 


OFFICERS 


WALTER E. BOEHM ’35 HENRY T. EMMONS ’35 

President Vice-President 

RALPH H. MEACHAM ’36 
Secret ary -T rea surer 



MEMBERS 



1935 


HARRY S. BARKER 

LESTER H. BENSON 

WALTER E. BOEHM 

HENRY T. EMMONS 

LELAND O. HUNT 

ARNOLD R. LAFORCE 

1936 

FRANK LOMBARDY 
OTTO W. PROCHAZKA, JR. 
ROBERT T. STAFFORD 

RAYMOND L. WHITNEY 

RICHARD L. WILLIAMS 
JOSEPH J. ZAWISTOSKI 

M. PIERCE CLONAN 

CONRAD HOEHN 

EL WOOD A. HOXIE 


HENRY F. MACLEAN 

RALPH H. MEACHAM 


Blue Key, founded in 1930, is a self perpetuating honorary society whose initiates 
have, in the minds of its members, acquired the qualities of manhood and sportsman- 
ship and have performed commendable service to Middlcbury. Blue Key supplanted 
Sage and Delta Tau, previous junior and sophomore honorary societies. 

The organization aids in the orientation of freshmen, in welcoming and accommodat- 
ing visiting athletic teams, and in acknowledging service to the college. Blue Key 
finances itself through the sale of freshman rule posters, freshman caps, and athletic 
programs, and by sponsoring several informal dances. This year the society limited 
the enforcement of freshman rules to the period preceding the Christmas vacation. 

New members of Blue Key are elected from the three upper classes and are tapped 
at a chapel ceremony soon after the spring recess. The insignia is a blue pin in the like- 
ness of a key and members wear a soft hat of navy blue embroidered with a light 
blue key. 


It I. I I] K i: V 

144 


1 



■ 



MACFADYEN GUILD BENSON HOEHN CLONAN SWEET MACLEAN MATHEWSON PICKENS SWETT 
NASH MEACHAM DAWES MARTIN HOXIE FORBUSH ROBERTS HUNT CADY LEETE PHINNEY 
PROCHAZKA GOLEMBESKE EVANS ZAWISTOSKI WILLIAMS BOEHM SHAFIROFF WHITNEY BARKER 


OFFICERS 


RICHARD L. WILLIAMS ’35 
President 


EL WOOD A. HOXIE ’36 
Sccretary-T reasurer 


MEMBERS 




ROGER M. BAKEY 
HARRY S. BARKER 
LESTER H. BENSON 
WALTER E. BOF.HM 
RUDOLPH V. BONA 
DONALD S. BROWN 
FRANCIS H. CADY 
DAVID O. COLLINS 


ANGUS M. BROOKS 
ROBERT H. BROWN 
HOWARD S. CADY 
M. PIERCE CLONAN 
I. WILLIAM DAWES 
RICHARD O. FORBUSH 


1935 

LESTER H. EVANS 
I ELAND O. HUNT 
WILLIAM A. HUNTER 
FRANK S. JANAS 
FRANK LOMBARDY 
PHILIP H. MATHEWSON 
HILLES R. PICKENS, 1R. 


1936 

ANTHONY GOLEMBESKE 
CONRAD HOEHN 
EL WOOD A. HOXIE 
LAWRENCE F. LEETE 
HENRY E. MACLEAN 
TOHN H. MARTIN 


OTTO W. PROCHAZKA, JR. 
VICTOR J. RICCIO 
CHARLES SHAFIROFF 
ROBERT T. STAFFORD 
RAYMOND L. WHITNEY 
RICHARD L. WILLIAMS 
WILLIAM A. YASINSK1 
JOSEPH J. ZAWISTOSKI 


RALPH H. MEACHAM 
IOHN E. NASH 
JAMES E. ROBERTS 
FRANK J. RUGGERI 
MALCOLM M. SWETT 
G. WILBUR WESTIN 


FRANCIS E. CLONAN 
WILLIAM G. CRAIG 


1937 

RANDALL W. HOFFMANN KENNETH W. MACFADYEN 

G. DUDLEY PHINNEY 




The "M” Club, founded in 1926, consists of all Middlebury alumni and under- 
graduates who have earned an "M” in one of the five major sports of football, basket- 
ball, hockey, track and baseball. Undergraduate members hold meetings every month. 

The organization awards "M” sweaters to all men who have received a letter in one 
of the major sports. Money for this purpose is obtained through the sponsoring of 
several informal dances at the McCullough gymnasium, and by contributions from the 
Undergraduate Association. The primary purpose of the club is to encourage athletics 
at Middlebury. 

••M** C I. IT II 




145 


J 



BRYAN DAVIS KETCH AM TIERNEY GOVE FISHER BLAKE SMITH HILLER GIBSON 
DEMPEWOI.FF WISHART AI.LBEE HANCHETT DEEDMAN ARNOLD MILLAR LOOMIS PROFESSOR GOODREDS 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

MARGERY T. HANCHETT ’35 
MARJORIE MCCANN ’35 


CHARLES A. DEEDMAN, |R. ’36 
FAITH ARNOLD ’35 


MEMBERS 

1935 


JOHN H. BLAKE 
JAMES S. MILLAR 
FAITH ARNOLD 
ELIZABETH J. BRYAN 
ALMA H. DAVIS 
JESSIE M. GIBSON 


1936 


LEWIS G. ALLBEE 
ROBERT B. BRYANT 
CHARLES A. DEEDMAN, JR. 
RICHARD F. DEMPEWOLFF 


MARGERY T. HANCHETT 
DORIS L. HILLER 
PATRICIA LITTLEFIELD 
ELIZABETH H. LOOMIS 
MARJORIE MCCANN 
MIRIAM E. SMITH 


EARL M. GOVE, JR. 
ALAN H. KETCHAM 
BARBARA T. WISHART 


The Wig and Pen Masque is the honorary dramatic society of the college. It was 
established at Middlebury for the purpose of creating interest in drama among students. 
Members of the junior and senior classes who have had a role in at least one play, 
have done a specified amount of work in the department and have shown an active 
interest in dramatics are eligible for membership. 

A new constitution was recently adopted in which the name of the society and 
requirements for membership were changed. The regular board of officers became the 
executive board. During the course of the year, the Masque holds three social meet- 
ings which are devoted to reviews of outstanding recent plays and to discussions of 
dramatic productions. An annual play is directed and presented by the club and a 
dinner dance is sponsored for members of the society and invited guests. 

It is largely due to Prof. V. Spencer Goodreds, the faculty advisor, and to the 
Wig and Pen Masque itself that dramatic activities have claimed such an important 
part in life on the Middlebury campus. 


\V I U A X II V E X >1 A S <1 I E 


146 




* 



LEWIS ARNONE MATTESON O’NEILL SMITH YOUNG MYERS 
GATES JACKMAN HUNT COUPERUS BUSKEY LAMB NEWELL 
ROSE CAMPAGNA MOREAU MACOMBER HEBARD PISKOR TAFT WILLIAMS SHEEHY 
I.ORD GRUGGEL SEELYE CHASE WOODMAN REILLY WILSON MCDERMOTT 


PROF. H. GODDARD OWEN 
Direr tor 


DOUGLAS F. REILLY ’36 
KENNETH V. JACKMAN ’37 


CARL A. GRUGGEL ’35 
LAURENS C. SEELYE ’35 


LEON SEARS ’34 
CHARLES H. WOODMAN *3$ 
IM 1 1 1 IP B. TALI >3 6 
PIERCE B. COUPERUS ’37 


A. RICHARD CHASE ’36 
DON S. GATES ’3 6 
BERNARD J. O’NEILL ’36 


OFFICERS 

CHARLES H. WOODMAN ’35 
Manager 

FIRST TENORS 

ARTHUR L. LORD ’37 
FRANK P. PISKOR ’37 
WILLIAM H. ARNONE ’38 

SECOND TENORS 

RALPH CAMPAGNA ’38 

FIRST BASSES 

ARTHUR E. WILSON ’37 
EMORY A. HEBARD ’38 
HAROLD W. LEWIS ’38 

SECOND BASSES 

l.LOYD G. WILLIAMS V> 
ROBERT G. MCDERMOTT ’37 
JOHN A. MACOMBER ’37 
PAUL A. MYERS ’37 

ACCOMPANIST 
VINCENT F. SARGENT ’34 


A. RICHARD CHASE ’36 
Assistant Manager 


M. JOHN HUNT ’38 
WILLIAM M. MOREAU ’38 


GEORGE W. LAMB ’38 
RICHARD C. ROSE ’38 


ROBERT J. M. MATTESON 

GRAHAM S. NEWELL ’38 
RICHARD J. SHEEHY ’38 


FREDERICK H. SMITH ’37 
PAUL G. BUSKEY ’38 
ROY W. YOUNG 38 


The Men’s Glee Club, which was founded in 1875, has been well-known for many 
years because of its annual concerts throughout northeastern states. This season the 
organization made trips throughout Vermont, southern New England, and the vicinity 
of metropolitan New York. On March 12, a home concert was given in Mead Chapel. 

There were four soloists this year: Frank Brieff, violinist; Vincent F. Sargent ’34, 
pianist; Gordon E. Hoyt ’36, cellist; and Douglas F. Reilly *36, tenor. The club 
selections ranged from delicate, melancholy, negro spirituals and folk songs to rol- 
licking sea chanteys and drinking songs. The thirty-two vocalists who compose the 
group were selected from nearly seventy men who tried out in early fall. "High 
spots” in this year’s program were radio broadcasts in Boston and New York City. 


Ip l i: i: 1 l r it 


. 


* 47 




BUSKF.Y DA R ROW NIMS ELLIOTT M A WEIR CAMPAGNA WHITE WHITTLESEY WILLIAMS HILL WESTBY 
MEAD SPRINGSTEAD MOREAU LAWRENCE ELLIS LEACH BROWN MATTESON ROBERTSON PISKOR 
RICCIO BERMAN POWERS PEACH HAYWARD CHASE ROWELL LEWIS BENNER FAIR BROTHER TAYLOR 


OFFICERS 


JOSEPH F. LECHNYR 
Director 

PEMBROKE L. NIMS ’35 
Manager 


EDGAR J. WILEY 
Faculty Advisor 
CLEMENT S. HILL * 3 6 
Assistant Manager 


PEMBROKE L. NIMS 

A. RICHARD CHASE 
EVERETT F. ELLIS 


MEMBERS 

1935 

1936 

CLEMENT S. HILL 
RICHARD C. HUBBARD 


W. NOEL WHITTLESEY 

RALPH H. MEACHAM 
J. REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD 


MARCUS W. BERMAN 
JOHN F. DARROW 
PARMELEE C. HILL 


HERMAN N. BENNER 
BRUCE M. BROWN 
PAUL G. BUSKEY 
RALPH CAMPAGNA 
A. LEETE ELLIOTT 
RAYMOND M. FAIRBROTHER 
CARROLL L. HASSELTINE 


*937 

ARMAND N. LAFLAMME 
CHARLES C. MAWER 
FRANK P. PISKOR 
WENDELL H. POWERS 

1938 

DONALD E. HAYWARD 
L. ROBERT LAWRENCE 
ROBERT R. LEACH 
HAROLD W. LEWIS 
ROBERT |. MATTESON 
HERVEY W. MEAD 


LAURENCE W. SHIELDS 
GORDON E. WESTBY 
SIDNEY P. WHITE 


WILLIAM M. MOREAU 
BRUCE B. PEACH 
ALBERT J. RICCIO 
CLIFFORD S. ROBERTSON 
JOHN H. ROWELL 
FREDERICK W. TAYLOR 
JOHN R. WILLIAMS 


Under the direction of Joseph F. Lechnyr, prominent Vermont musician, the band 
made excellent progress this year. Its membership was augmented by enthusiastic and 
capable underclassmen, giving the organization a total of thirty-eight members. The 
popularity of the band was marked by its reception by students and speakers at Middle- 
bury Night and football rallies, where its value in stimulating an active spirit in the 
college was commented on by President Paul D. Moody. 

The band’s activity is divided into two seasons, a late spring and a fall program. 
Last spring the band showed its deeper musical appreciation in the program of classical 
music offered during junior week on the steps of Mead Chapel. During senior week the 
group presented another concert and led the commencement procession. Playing at all 
home football contests and trips to Williams and Tufts were the outstanding events of 
the fall season. 


It A A II 


148 



HOYT CHAMBERLIN SHIELDS VOTER WHITE COSENZA L. ELLIOTT C. ELLIOTT LEACH 
WISH ART DANSEREAU WHITNEY HATHAWAY DOLE S. ELLIOTT WILEY 


SIDNEY P. WHITE ’37 
President 


OFFICERS 

GORDON E. HOYT ’36 MARION A. PERKINS ’37 

Vice-President Secrctary-T reasnrer 


MARY G. BALLARD ’35 

GORDON E. HOYT ’36 


CONCERT MASTERS 

HELEN M. KUECHEL ’37 

STUDENT CONDUCTORS 

SARAH L. ELLIOTT ’35 MARY E. DANSEREAU ’36 


W. NOEL WHITTLESEY 
MARY G. BALLARD 


GORDON E. HOYT 
JOHN C. PIERCE 


MEMBERS 
19 35 

FRANCES E. BOUTON 
SARAH L. ELLIOTT 

1936 

T. REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD 
DOROTHY B. CHAMBERLIN 
MARY E. DANSEREAU 


LOIS A. STUDLEY 
JEAN C. WILEY 


LOUISE E. HUBBARD 
LOUISE E. HUTCHINSON 


CARROLL L. HASSELTINE 
NELSON B. MILLIGAN 
ROBERT D. MORGAN 
LAURENCE W. SHIELDS 
SIDNEY P. WHITE 


HERMAN N. BENNER 
EDWARD I). CUMMINGS 
A. LEETE ELLIOTT 
WERNER P. ICKSTADT 


1937 

ELIZABETH BEEBE 
MARGHERITA M. COSENZA 
GERTRUDE E. DOLE 
CAROLINE H. ELLIOTT 
SUSAN L. HATHAWAY 
DORIS E. HEALD 

1938 

NELSON C. KEABLES 
ROBERT R. LEACH 
DONALD J. WILTSIE 
ANNA K. ALLEN 


HELEN M. KUECHEL 
MARION A. PERKINS 
MARGARET W. SCHERHOLZ 
RUTH E. WICKWARE 
MARION E. WISHART 


DOROTHY E. DUNBAR 
JANE FIDDLE 
BETTY G. SHARLEY 
DOROTHY SIMONDS 


The college orchestra this year has been organized into the Orchestral Club. The 
constitution of the new organization states that its aim is "to promote an interest in 
orchestral music and playing, and to maintain a high standard of accomplishment and 
performance in the orchestra.” Any student who plays an instrument is invited to 
become a member. The training enables the student to become more proficient as well 
as more familiar with classical music. Rehearsals are held weekly in preparation for 
an annual spring concert. 

O IK C II 1 ; S T IK A L C L 1J IK 


149 



SEEl.EY HUTCHINSON TRASK HOOK HOWARD BROOKS ARNOLD 

FOERSTER HILLER CONLEY HARRIS ELLIOTT HUBBARD LAMSON 
WILEY CI.OUCH HANCHETT DUKE BOURNE STUDLEY COOKE 


ELEANOR M. DUKE ’ 3 * 
President 


FAITH ARNOLD 
MARY G. BALLARD 
ROBERTA E. BOURNE 
FRANCES E. BOUTON 
VERA R. BROOKS 
MAYWOOD L. CLOUGH 


M. CHRISTINE CONLEY 
MARY E. DANSEREAU 
MARION A. HOOK 


EDITH DOUGLAS ’34 


OFFICERS 

MRS. LEWIS J. HATHAWAY 
Faculty Advisor 


MEMBERS 
1 93 5 

ALICE E. COOKE 
SARAH L. ELLIOTT 
GRACE M. HARRIS 
DORIS L. HILLER 
MARY A. HOWARD 


1936 

LOUISE E. HUBBARD 
LOUISE E. HUTCHINSON 
DOROTHY M. JORDAN 


HONORARY MEMBERS 
IRMGARD FOERSTER 


MARGERY T. HANCHETT ’35 
Secretary-T reasurcr 


FRANCES A. LAMSON 
PATIENCE LYON 
LOIS MACK 

ELIZABETH A. SEELEY 
LOIS A. STUDLEY 
JEAN C. WILEY 


MARGARET R. LEACH 
CORNELIA B. PHILIPS 
ELIZABETH TRASK 


MATILDA A. ROMEO ’34 


The A Tempo Club holds a prominent position in the musical circle of the 
women’s college. The club was founded in 1929 and is composed of women who have 
studied one or more semesters in the music department and have shown an interest in 
musical activities. The purpose of the group is to provide its members with an 
opportunity to accustom themselves to performing before an audience. 

The club sponsors twilight musicales, given each Friday, which have become popular 
with the student body. These musicales are half hour programs presented by students 
of both colleges who have talent and interest in instrumental or vocal music. One 
of the outstanding features of this year’s program was the opportunity given to its 
members to hear Richard Crooks. The annual banquet of the club was held as a 
Christmas party. Under the guidance of Miss Irmgard Foerster members have studied 
German folk songs. 


A T E M I 1 O C I. I K 


50 



■ 



EASLKR HUTCHINSON REII-LY SHIPMAN ELLIOTT PICKARL) 
FINGAN ELLIS GREENE PISKOR BROCK LEONARD DARROW 
HOX1E STARTUP AVERY EMMONS KUSTER TILFORD CARTER 


OFFICERS 


HENRY T. EMMONS ’35 
President 

CHARLES A. KUSTER 35 
Secretary 


ARCHIBALD C. TILFORD ’36 
Vice-President 

JOHN M. AVERY, JR. *36 
Program Chairman 


MEMBERS 


JAMES S. BROCK 
GEORGE A. ELLIOTT 
HENRY T. EMMONS 


JOHN M. AVERY, JR. 
WILLIAM H. CARTER, JR. 
GEORGE H. DEMING 
DONALD W. EASLER 
EVERETT S. ELLIS 


1935 

LELAND O. HUNT 
CHARLES A. KUSTER 
ARNOLD R. LAFORCE 
JAMES S. MILLAR 

1936 

WILLIAM H. FINIGAN 
EARL M. GOVE, JR. 
FOSTER C. GREENE 
DOUGLAS T. HALL 
EL WOOD A. HOXIE 
HENRY H. KIR WIN 


KENNETH W. RUDD 
HYATT H. WAGGONER 
RAYMOND L. WHITNEY 


DOUGLAS F. REILLY 
VICTOR N. SANBORN 
CHARLES FI. STARTUP 
ARCHIBALD C. TILFORD 
LLOYD G. WILLIAMS 


IOFIN F. DARROW 
HERBERT T. S. ELLISON 
NATHANIEL C. GROBY 
ROBERT L. HUTCHINSON 


1937 

ROBERT W. LEONARD 
RALPH W. PICKARD 
FRANK P. PISKOR 


ALBERT W. POLLARD 
LEWIS B. SHIPMAN 
EDWIN A. VASSER 
GORDON E. WESTBY 


The purpose of the Liberal Club is to stimulate intelligent discussion and develop 
serious consideration of current economic and political topics by the students. Al- 
though founded in 1932, the group’s active membership testifies to its popularity. 

As part of an ambitious program, the club secured Norman Thomas as its main 
speaker last year. His lecture filled Mead Chapel with an attentive and receptive 
audience. Stimulated by this successful event, the club arranged an extensive program 
for this year. At the regular meetings members of the faculty were the guest speakers. 
Edith F. Muther of the World Peace Foundation spoke to the group early in March. 
As its chief undertaking of the year, the organization obtained Sherwood Eddy, inter- 
nationally famed economist, to speak early in April. 

The hope of the organization is to hold a round-table discussion, led by nationally 
known figures representing all lines of political thought, inviting representatives of all 
the eastern colleges to participate. 


1 5 1 


I. I It i: II A I 


< I. I II 



FOSTER CONKLIN CADY DEM PE WOLFF 
HOOK M. SMITH W. SMITH GIBSON liAILEY 


GOVERNING BOARD 

W. WYMAN SMITH *3 5 PAUL W. FOSTER ’37 

President Treasurer 

MARION A. HOOK ’36 
Recorder 

ITINERARY CHAIRMEN 

HOWARD S. CADY ’36 MIRIAM E. SMITH ’35 

EQUIPMENT CHAIRMEN 

RICHARD F. DEMPEWOLFF ’36 ELIZABETH B. BAILEY ’35 

MEMBERSHIP CHAIRMEN 

CLIFFORD T. CONKLIN, JR. *36 JESSIE M. GIBSON *35 

COUNSELLORS 

DEAN BURT A. HAZELTINE PROF. VERNON C. HARRINGTON 

MISS MARION L. YOUNG MRS. VERNON C. HARRINGTON 

Since its birth in the spring of 1931, the Mountain Club has shown more rapid 
growth than any other organization on the Middlebury campus. Under excellent 
leadership, it has this year presented to the student body a well rounded program of 
activities. 

In the spring and fall, numerous day and overnight hikes were conducted to points 
of interest on the mountain campus and ski and snowshoe trips featured the program 
during the winter season. The club was also sponsor of the annual Winter Carnival 
held during the weekend of February 1 5-17, as well as the college championship ski 
jumping contest. As a member of the Intercollegiate Outing Club Association, it 
has worked in collaboration with similar organizations in other colleges and universities. 
Middlebury will play host to the representatives of these clubs in the Association’s 
annual conference to be held this spring at Bread Loaf. 

Ski instruction classes for both men and women under the tutelage of a professional 
skier and the new jump constructed on Chipman hill have been instrumental in 
making Middlebury winter sport conscious. 

M O T \ TAIN C I. I It 




STAGE SET FOR "EVERYMAN ” 


"R.U.R.” 

Cast 

Harry Domino richard f. dempewolff ’36 

Sulla MARGERY T. HANCHFTT ’35 

Marins John h. blare ’35 

Dr. Gall charles a. deedman *36 

Mr. Fabry Robert w. Leonard ’37 

Dr. Hallemeiet Jonathan m. peck ’37 
Mr. Alquist earl M. gove ’36 

Consul Busman John f. darrow *37 

Nana marion w. russell *35 

Ratlins Archibald c. tiliord *36 

Helena louise g. fleig ’35 

Primus .MEREDITH H. STAFFORD ’37 

A servant edward p. berry *37 

First Robot arthur h. williams *35 

Second Robot frank s. boyce ’3 6 

Third Robot douglas t. hall ’36 


"EVERYMAN” 

Cast 

Messenger james s. millar *35 

Everyman.. Robert j. m. mattfson *38 
God JONATHAN M. PECK *37 

Death Frederick h. smith ’37 

Fellowship merman n. bf.nner ’38 

Cousin JAMES A. MINER *38 

Kindred carol bloom *37 

Goods EMORY A. HE BARD ’38 

Good Deeds Margaret a. Lawrence ’38 

Strength Marjorie young *35 

Discretion don s. gates ’36 

Five Wits jennie-belle perry *38 

Beauty helen e. barnum ’37 

Knowledge muriel k. jones *37 

Confession joy a. rahr ’37 

Angel ANNETTE C. TUTHILL *38 


Opportunities for acting and work in coaching, producing, costuming, scene-paint- 
ing and make-up are afforded to students through the dramatic activities of the college. 
Several long plays are given each year under the direction of Prof. V. Spencer Goodreds, 
head of the dramatics department, and a number of shorter plays are produced by 
members of the play production class. 

The last performance of the 1933-34 season was "Outward Bound,” an imaginative 
description of death, by Sutton Vane. It was presented May 8 and 9 as a part of the 
junior week program and repeated during senior week. Included in the cast were: 
Eugene G. Hoyt *34, Emery T. Hutchins *34, James S. Millar ’35, Charles A. Deedman 
*36, Richard F. Dempewolff ’36, Victor N. Sanborn ’36, Dorothy M. Jordan ’36, 
Elizabeth V. MacArthur ’37, and Joy A. Rahr *37. 

This year’s season opened with the presentation, on October 30 and 31, ot "R.U.R.,” 
Karel Kapek’s satire on modern mechanized society. November 29, two one-act plays 
were presented. "Tea Time,” a comedy by George Savage, was produced by Faith 
Arnold ’35 and Miriam E. Smith ’35. "When Did They Meet Again,” by Harold 
Brighouse, was coached by Elizabeth J. Bryan ’35 and Elizabeth H. Loomis 35. 

"Everyman,” the outstanding morality play of the sixteenth century, was given 
February 18 and 19. Special scenery and musical effects planned by Professor Goodreds 
were a feature of the production. The performance was in the nature of an experi- 
ment since the play contains none of the production elements of a modern play. 


II It A >1 ATI! S 


153 





PRODUCTION STAFF 


V. SPENCER GOODREDS ERIK L. SWYLER 

Director Dramatics Assistant 

J. WILBUR SMITH 
T rcasurvr 


EXPERIMENTAL DIRECTORS 

FAITH ARNOLD ’35 ELIZABETH H. LOOMIS ’33 

ELIZABETH J. BRYAN ’35 MIRIAM E. SMITH ’35 

JESSIE M. GIBSON ’35 


COSTUMES 

ALICE DEWEY ’36 
BARBARA T. WISHART ’36 


PROPERTIES 

DOROTHY GRAY ’35 HARMONY BUELL *36 

ELIZABETH M. BUCKLIN ’36 KATHERINE WORCESTER ’36 


ELEANOR GOODRICH ’35 
RUTH E. STETSON ’35 


MAKE-UP 


FAITH ARNOLD ’35 
ELIZABETH J. BRYAN ’35 
JESSIE M. GIBSON ’35 


ELIZABETH H. LOOMIS ’35 
MIRIAM E. SMITH ’35 


ELECTRICIANS 


ALAN H. KETCH AM ’36 


ROBERT B. BRYANT ’37 


04 






II II A >1 A TICS 



* 



KE1R BENNER PALMER MATTESON STEELE RICHARDSON 
DARROW PICKARD TILFORD PROFESSOR PERKINS DEEDMAN AVERY 


MEMBERS 


PROF. PERLEY C. PERKINS 
Con i h 

JOHN M. AVERY, JR. ’36 
CHARLES A. DEEDMAN, )R. ’36 
I ACK STEELE ’36 


ARCHIBALD C. TILFORD ’36 
JOHN F. DARROW *37 
RALPH W. PICKARD ’37 
JACK C. KEIR ’38 
PHILLIPS PALMER ’38 


November 

14 

SCHEDULE 

Oxford 

Home 

December 

10 

Union 

Away 

December 

1 1 

Williams 

Away 

December 

1 2 

Tufts 

Away 

December 

*3 

Boston University 

Away 

December 

14 

M. I. T. 

Away 

January 

3 i 

Springfield 

Home 

February 

19 

Drew 

Home 

February 

26 

New York University 

Away 

February 

2 7 

Rutgers 

Away 

February 

28 

Princeton 

Away 

March 

7 

Puerto Rico 

Home 

March 

1 5 

Massachusetts State 

Home 

April 

3 

Davidson 

Home 

April 

10 

Dartmouth 

Away 

April 

2 5 

Vermont 

Home 

April 

2 7 

St. Lawrence 

Away 


Spurred on by their successful season last year, the men’s debating team made excel- 
lent progress this season. It won a large percentage of its forensic contests, debating 
most of the prominent eastern colleges. The enthusiastic response given by the fresh- 
men, to the call for tryouts, uncovered men with promise and ability. Subjects debated 
concerned current topics such as: munitions, economic nationalism, and fascism. 

The outstanding features of the year were two debates held with visiting foreign 
teams. The Middlebury men encountered representatives of Oxford in November before 
a large audience. Early in March a team from the University of Puerto Rico visited 
Middlebury and were enthusiastically received. 

Participation in radio debates was another marked feature this year. In December 
two different teams debated Union over station WGY, Schenectady ; and Boston Uni- 
versity over station WNAC in Boston. Another debate, with St. Lawrence, was 
broadcast over station WCAD at Canton, N. Y. 


M E \ - S II i: II A T I X U 




155 


m 



LILLEY KEVAN 
KNOX COBB WISH ART 


OFFICERS 


PROF. PERLEY C. PERKINS 


BARBARA T. WISH ART 

’36 

Coach 



Manager 




MEMBERS 



ELEANORE R. COBB ’56 



EDITH K. DUBOIS 

’38 

BARBARA W. LILLEY ’36 



JANE W. KINGSLEY 


BARBARA T. WISH ART ’36 


JEANNETTE L. LEAVENS 

’ 3 « 

ELIZABETH B. KNOX ’37 



ANNETTE C. TUTHILL 

’38 



SCHEDULE 



October 

2 5 

Bates 

Home 


December 

7 

Keene Normal 

Home 


December 

l 9 

Rhode Island State 

Away 


December 

20 

Pembroke 

Away 


February 

7 

New York State Teacher’s 

College Home 


March 

4 

William and Mary 

Home 


March 

1 9 

College of New Rochelle 

Away 


March 

20 

Upsala 

Away 


March 

21 

New York University 

Away 


April 

1 6 

Vermont 

Away 



Since all of last year’s varsity squad were underclassmen, the women’s debating 
team this year was bolstered by debaters of a year’s experience. By having a more 
extensive schedule than last year, freshmen showing greatest promise in the tryouts 
were used in varsity engagements. Throughout the year the cooperation of each group 
was marked. 

Two long trips and one short trip were taken by the team. Preceeding the Christ- 
mas holidays the women made their annual Boston trip and at the spring recess they 
toured lower New York State and ended the season when they debated Vermont at 
Burlington. 

The practice which Middlebury has always preferred was again followed this year 
in debating topics of current interest. "Resolved: That the federal government 
should adopt a policy of equalization of educational opportunities throughout the 
nation by means of annual grants to the states for public, elementary, and secondary 
education” was debated earlier in the year while one of the topics debated later was, 
"Resolved: That the nations should agree to prevent the international shipment of 
arms and munitions.” With such subjects, interest has been stimulated in the student 
body, both as an audience and as debaters. 

W O M E X- S II E B A T I \ U 



i*6 




ORTON BINKERD SUTLIFFE COBB CARTER ANDERSON ARNOLD L1NDBERG TUCKER 
GATES DAVIES LEWIS DAMS WILLIAMS DEWEY CANFIELD YOUNG MALVERN 
LITTLEFIELD HAVARD KNIGHT CHAFFEE KNOX TRASK HIGGINS BOWLES MCCANN 
DECHIARA TARNEY BAKER PLATT CHAPMAN 


OFFICERS 

JOSEPHINE KNOX ’ 35 FRANCES M. CHAFFEE ’35 

President Vice-President 

ELIZABETH TRASK ’ 3 6 
Secret ary-T rcasurer 


The English Club is an honorary society of both colleges founded in 1921 to 
stimulate greater interest in art and literature, and to promote the discussion of 
literary subjects in a social atmosphere. 

Monthly meetings are held at the home of President and Mrs. Paul D. Moody. The 
programs consist of special talks by faculty members, students, or guests, followed by 
discussions. October 3, Dr. Douglas S. Beers, head of the English department, gave 
readings from old English and a brief talk on ’‘The Beginnings of English Literature. ” 
November 22, Mr. Lansing V. Hammond, on leave from the English department at 
Middlebury, spoke on Charles Lamb; and January 16, President Moody discussed H. G. 
Wells. February 5, Miss Rose E. Martin of the Spanish department talked on Odell 
Shepard. 

Membership usually does not exceed forty, and is for the most part restricted to 
juniors and seniors. The admittance of new members is through written application 
and a majority vote of the club. Elections are based on high scholastic standing with 
special attention given to the courses in the English department, work done on the pub- 
lications of the college, and the individual’s interest in the purpose of the club. 


I] N (iMS II < L II II 


157 




U i; IK >1 A \ 


f L I IK 


OFFICERS 

LOUISE G. FLEIG *35 LEWIS G. ALLBEE ’36 

President Secretary-Treasurer for Men 

ALICE E. COOKE ’35 
Secretary-Treasurer for Women 

Two groups form the German Club: die Sleine Gruppe, a small group for advanced 
students, and der Deutsche Verein, the larger group for all German students. Both 
meet once a month to study the music, games, and folksongs of Germany as a back- 
ground for their study of its language and literature. The club is a member of the 
National Federation of German Clubs of America, of which its faculty advisor, Prof. 
Werner Neuse, is president. Through this organization contact with clubs in other 
colleges is established, a successful exchange having already been made with the club 
at Dartmouth. 

Activities this year have included talks by Professor Neuse on the history and 
customs of Germany and a series of lectures on the art of various periods. A puppet 
show was also given by Professor Neuse. Carol singing and a nativity play were 
presented at Christmas time and a winter picnic at Lake Dunmore was held later in 
the year. The department was fortunate this year in having an exchange student, Miss 
Irmgard Foerster, of the University of Berlin, who has assisted the German Club in its 
programs and also given talks to various organizations. The club is attempting to 
bring German programs to the college, having presented Mr. Max Montor in readings 
last spring and this year sponsoring Mr. Hans Merx, an interpreter of German folk- 
songs. 

F IK i: A A II C L I IK 

OFFICERS 

SUZANNE M. TREILLET ’35 
President 

ROXANA E. LEWIS ’36 
T reasurer 

The French Club provides an excellent opportunity for those students who do not 
live at the Chateau to increase their knowledge of conversational French and to become 
more familiar with the literature, music, and customs of France. The club itself is 
affiliated with the international organization known as "L’Alliance Francaise. 

The first meeting of the year was the traditional "bacon bat” held on Chipman 
hill. Monthly meetings of the club are held in the Grand Salon of the Chateau. This 
year’s program included several short plays given by students and faculty members, 
a class stunt night, a puppet show and several talks on various phases of French life 
and culture. The first formal dance of the club was held in February. 

Membership is not restricted to those who take courses in the French department, 
but is open to all students who are interested in the language. 


HELEN G. ARONSON ’36 
Vice-President 


S r A X I S II ( I. I IK 

OFFICERS 

MARGERY T. HANCHETT ’35 LOUISE H. FULTON ’35 

President Secretary 

PAUL A. MYERS ’37 
Treasurer 

The Spanish Club holds monthly meetings to further interest in the life, literature 
and culture of Spain. The group produces dramatic presentations, sponsors talks and 
discussions on topics relating to Spain, and holds social functions similar to those 
held among Spanish speaking peroples. 

A chicken and rice supper served in the Spanish manner initiated this year’s program. 
Early in March the club sponsored the annual Spanish Carnival, the only costume 
dance held during the college year. Members of the club and their invited guests at- 
tended and prizes were awarded for the outstanding costumes. 

All members of the student body who are interested in any aspect of Spanish life 
are invited to join this organization. 


I. A > U U A U i: C I. IT II S 


i S 8 


Football. . . .Basketball. . . . 
Hockey. . . .Baseball. . . . 


Track. . . .Minor Sports. . . . 


Women's Athletics. 


A T II I. E 


TICS 









a t ii l i: t I < c o i x c i i 


The Athletic Council exists to promote interest in and regulate all athletic activities 
within the men’s college and in intercollegiate contests. It guides and determines the 
athletic policy of the college and oversees the management of all funds pertaining to 
these activities. The election of undergraduates to offices on various teams and schedules 
for intercollegiate sports must be approved by the council. This body also decides 
questions of eligibility which are not related to scholastic standing and awards insignia 
to eligible team members. 

Membership in the council includes the Director of Athletics, five faculty members, 
the president of the Undergraduate Association, one alumnus, captains of the major 
sports and of each minor sport in season. Varsity managers are ex-officio members. 


OFFICERS 


DEAN BURT A. HAZELTINE 
President 

HENRY F. MACLEAN ’36 
Secretary 


PROF. PERLEY C. VOTER 
Vice-President 


MEMBERS 


COACH ARTHUR M. BROWN 
PROF. REGINALD L. COOK 
PROF. HARRY M. FIFE 
DEAN BURT A. HAZELTINE 
PROF. PHELPS N. SWF.TT 
PROF. PERLEY C. VOTER 
HARRY S. BARKER ’35 


WALTER E. BOEHM ’3* 
PHILLIP H. MATHEWSON ’33 
RICHARD L. WILLIAMS ’33 
JOSEPH I. ZAWISTOSKI ’35 
M. PIERCE CLONAN ’36 
HENRY F. MACLEAN ’36 


MEMBERS IN SEASON 

ARNOLD R. LAFORCE ’35 RALPH H. MEACHAM ’36 

LAWRENCE F. LEETE *3 6 J. REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD '3 6 


MEMBERS EX-OFFICIO 


LESTER H. BENSON ’35 
DONALD S. BROWN ’35 
ELLIS K. HAINES ’33 
LELAND O. HUNT ’33 
FRANK S. ! ANAS ’33 


CHARLES A. KUSTER ’33 
JAMES S. MILLAR ’33 
W. WYMAN SMITH ’33 
ROBERT T. STAFFORD ’33 



MEACHAM LAFORCE BARKER CLONAN MACLEAN MATHEWSON SPRINGSTEAD 
WILLIAMS PROFESSOR SWF.TT COACH BROWN PROFESSOR COOK DEAN HAZELTINE BOEHM ZAWISTOSKI 





O O T It A I. I 


OFFICERS 

BENJAMIN H. BECK 
Coach 

FORREST C. BRANCH 
Assistant Coach 

WALTER E. BOEHM ’35 
Co-Captain 

RICHARD L. WILLIAMS ’35 
Co-Captain 

ANTHONY GOLEMBESKE ’36 
Captain-Elect 

FRANK S. JANAS ’33 
Manager 

CHARLES H. STARTUP ’3 6 
Manager-Elect 



CO-CAPTAIN BOEHM 


LETTER MEN 


WALTER E. BOEHM ’35 
DAVID O. COLLINS ’35 
LESTER H. EVANS ’35 
FRANK S. JANAS ’35 
CHARLES SHAFIROFF ’35 
ROBERT T. STAFFORD ’35 


RICHARD B. SWEET ’35 
RAYMOND L. WHITNEY ’35 
RICHARD L. WILLIAMS ’35 
WILLIAM A. YASINSKI ’35 
JOSEPH J. ZAWISTOSKI ’35 



WARREN PHILIPSON AKLEY NASH 

COACH BECK MANAGER JANAS CI.ARK LABOUCHERE SWEET BROWN CHASE CADY 
ROBERTS HOXIE STAFFORD TOR BUSH MACLEAN EVANS GOLEMBESKE WILLIAMS 


I 60 


F O O T It A L I 




CO-CAPTAIN WILLIAMS 


SCHEDULE 

MIDDLEBURY 47 — OSWEGO STATE 6 
MIDDLEBURY 19— WILLIAMS 17 
MIDDLEBURY 3 - — COAST GUARD 2 
MIDDLEBURY 13— ST. ANSELM’S 19 
MIDDLEBURY 12— NORWICH o 
MIDDLEBURY 3— TUFTS 18 
MIDDLEBURY o— VERMONT 0 

WON 3 LOST 3— TIED 1 


LETTERMEN 


ROBERT H. BROWN ')6 
HOWARD S. CADY ’36 
RICHARD O. FORBUSH ’36 
ANTHONY GOLEMBESKE ’36 
EL WOOD A. HOXIE ’36 


LAWRENCE F. LEETE ’36 
HENRY F. MACLEAN ’36 
G. WILBUR WESTIN ’36 
WILLIAM G. CRAIG ’37 
RANDALL W. HOFFMANN ’37 





1 

/ 1 J 

Tf r’ i ,1 


f / i 



l l i \ 


WARD CRAIG ROSS COACH BRANCH 

HOITMANN WESTIN Rl'BB YASINSKI RUGCERI ASSISTANT MANAGER STARTUP TRAINER 1 ARRELL 
BOEHM ZAWISTOSKI SHAFIROF F WHITNEY LOMBARDY LEETE COLLINS 


I 6 I 


F O O T II A I. L 


SEASON 

A game, well trained 1934 Panther football team fought its 
way, in most cases against heavy odds, through a tough seven 
game schedule with a record of three wins, one tie and three 
defeats. It shares again the honor of holding the Green Moun- 
tain Conference championship as a result of a scoreless tie with 
the University of Vermont in the final game of the season. 

The team, characteristic of most Middlebury elevens in the 
past, was light but scrappy, making up in fight what it lacked 
in weight. It was largely a veteran aggregation with every posi- 
tion but one filled by a man who had seen considerable varsity 
service the year before. A lack of good reserve power, however, 
was a severe handicap throughout the whole campaign as time 
and again in the closing periods of combat the tiring Panther 
regulars found it impossible to match successfully the elevens of 
their opponents replenished with fresh reserve power. As in 
previous years Coaches Beck and Branch had the team well 
founded in intricate Warner manuevers that yielded 127 points throughout the season, 
the Panther scoring in all but the final contest. The lack of weight, of course, was 
felt most severely in the forward wall but here again proper grounding in the necessary 
essentials and finer points of good line play combined with indomitable spirit to partially 
overcome the handicap. 



COACH BFCK 


OSWEGO STATE 

In the first game of the season, Middlebury ran roughshod over a weak Oswego State 
Normal team to win easily by a 47-6 count. The contest was an ideal one for an 
opener with the weakness of the opposition affording Coach Beck ample opportunity 
to experiment with frequent substitutions. 

In the first period the Panther scored twice, Boehm racing off tackle for the first 
tally and Evans crossing the line with a pass from Williams. Forbush also added two 
points during this period when he blocked a punt in the enemy end zone. The second 
period was scoreless, but the third stanza opened with Midd blocking another kick in 
the end zone. Boehm and Zawistoski both added touchdowns shortly afterwards, and 
Chubb, an opposing back, intercepted a lateral pass for the only Oswego score. In the 



BOEHM MAKES AN END SWEEP VERMONT GAME 


162 




V O O T II A L I. 


& 


final quarter Boehm scored two more touchdowns and Williams 
added another as the contest ended. 



WILLIAMS 

The season's first loss was sustained at the hands of the Pur- 
ple of Williams in a contest played on a wet, slippery held at 
Williamstown. The heavy going placed the lighter Panther at 
a severe disadvantage as cleats failed to hold in the soggy turf. 

Williams scored twice in the hrst period before MacLean fell 
on a loose ball over the Purple goal for the hrst Middlebury 
tally. No scoring for the rest of the half left the count 13-6 
at the opening of the third period. Middlebury evened the 
score in this stanza, however, when, after consistent Blue and 
White gains, Boehm raced hfteen yards off right tackle for the 
touchdown, the extra point being added by a pass. 

The fourth quarter saw Holmes of the Purple scoring on a 
run off right tackle and a pass, Holmes to Stanley, accounted 
for another Williams tally. Midd was not yet through, however, for quarterback Wil- 
liams completed seven out of eight forwards, one of which was tossed to Sweet for the 
final score of the encounter bringing the total count to Williams 27, Middlebury 19. 


CAPTAIN-ELECT 
GOLEM BESKE 


COAST GUARD 

The Blue and White entered the win column again when it overcame the efforts 
of the Cadets of the U. S. Coast Guard Academy to win 32-2 in the second home game 
of the season. 

The Panther was severely hampered by injuries sustained in the Williams contest, 
but after a scorless first half capitalized every opportunity offered it to bury the Guards- 
men under a scoring barrage. 

The first tally came as a result of Sweet intercepting a Cadet pass as the whole 
Panther team hurried the thrower, and racing thirty yards for the score. A long aerial, 
Williams to Forbush who was stationed over the opposition’s goal, accounted for the 
next Panther score with Sweet adding the extra point from placement. Zawistoski 
spun through the very center of the line for another tally, this being shortly followed 



ZAWISTOSKI SPINS THROUGH THE LINE VERMONT GAME 


63 


F O O T II A L L 


by the only Guardsmen score as Leete, attempting to punt from 
behind his own goal, stepped over the end zone, two points being 
awarded the opposition. 

The third Middlcbury excursion over the Cadet goal came 
when Boehm intercepted an enemy pass on his own io-yard 
marker to race the 90 intervening yards and cross the line stand- 
ing up. Another perfect aerial, this time from Williams to 
Evans, accounted for the final touchdown of the contest. 

ST. ANSELM’S 

The second setback came at the hands of the Blue of St. 

Anselm’s in a loosely played contest at Manchester, N. H., the 
Panther succumbing 19-13. In a game marred by numerous 
fumbles the Blue and White saw an early touchdown lead 
dwindle before a polished Saint passing attack, with reserve 
weakness again taking its toll. 

Middlebury scored early when a sustained march culminating 
in a long run by Boehm, registered the first tally, of the con- 
test. Hoxie converted from placement. In the second quarter St. Anselm’s took to the 
air and after a series of effective short and long passes succeeded in tallying. 

The third quarter found neither team being able to penetrate the other’s defense 
but the last period had not progressed far before another Saint pass netted six more 
points. After a Midd fumble on its own five yard line had been recovered by the opposi- 
tion, anothei score followed to make it 19-7 against the Panther. Reverting to its own 
passing attack, however, the Blue and White succeeded in bringing the ball into scor- 
ing position from which spot Zawistoski took it over as the contest ended. 

NORWICH 

In its first Green Mountain Conference tilt, the Blue and White clearly showed its 
superiority over a gallant Norwich eleven as it downed the Cadets by a 12-0 score at 
Sabine Field. Middlebury played conservative football for most of the contest holding 
back until the best possible moment to release the perfectly executed plays that re- 
sulted in only scores of the contest. Norwich confined itself mostly to an aerial attack 
but the Panther had the plays all well spotted early in their execution. 



COACH BRANCH 



PANTHER TACKLF.RS SMOTHER OPPOSING BACK VERMONT GAME 


164 


I O O T It A I. L 


Middlebury first scored early in the second quarter. With 
the ball resting on the Norwich 47-yard line, Boehm took a 
short pass from Zawistoski to weave his way through the whole 
Cadet team. The second touchdown was tallied in the third 
quarter when Forbush received a pass from Williams on the 
Norwich 16-yard line to cross the goal line untouched. 

TUFTS 

Journeying to Medford, two weeks later, the Panther lost 
18-3 to a truly powerful Tufts eleven, returning with the dis- 
tinction of having broken the Jumbos’ unscored-on record. The 
game was close throughout, with the lighter Panther team show- 
ing equal aggressive strength in matching the Jumbos’ eight first 
downs to eight. Five intercepted passes, three of which Tufts 
converted into touchdowns tell the story. 

In the latter part of the first stanza, Hingston intercepted 
a Blue and White pass for the first score after a sixty-five-yard 
run. Hoxie then tallied for Midd with a perfect field goal from 
the thirty-six yard line to mar the coveted Tufts record. After intercepting another 
pass, Hingston again scored, this time on a spinner through the line. A shortside line 
buck by Froehlich in the final period netted the third and last Jumbo touchdown. 

VERMONT 

In the final game of the season, the Blue and White battled the University of Ver- 
mont to a scoreless tie on a wet Porter Field in a vain effort to determine the rightful 
recipient of this year’s Green Mountain Conference championship. 

The slippery condition of the gridiron handicapped both elevens, and the drabness 
of the contest was added to by the fact that both were too well schooled in each others 
offensive tactics for the spectator’s satisfaction. Defensive football featured most of 
the afternoon’s play with Williams of the Panther successfully matching kicks with 
Cook of the Catamount. Vermont led in first downs, four to three with two of the 
Catamount ten-yard advances coming as a result of Panther penalties. 

Twice did Middlebury cross the Green and Gold goal, but on both occasions the 
play was called back by official ruling. At one time Evans blocked a Catamount kick 



MANAGER JANAS 



WILLIAMS TOSSES SHORT PASS VERMONT GAME 


165 


F O O T II A I. L 


to race across the line, while at another Boehm cut through tackle to carry the ball over, 
the ruling being, however, that he had stepped outside during the course of his run. 
Vermont’s offensive endeavors were centered around four unsuccessful attempts at field 
goals by Cook, the game ending just as the last of these flew far wide of its mark. 

PROSPECTS FOR 1935 

With twelve lettermcn returning in the fall, in spite of the fact that this year 
Middlebury will face a stiff, eight-game schedule, prospects are bright for another 
successful season. 

Opening with two hard home games against Union and Williams, the Blue and 
White will then journey to New London to meet its victim of the past two years, the 
Coast Guard Academy. Tufts will be next encountered at Medford, and then the first 
of the Green Mountain opponents, Norwich, will be met at Middlebury. St. Lawrence 
and Ithaca, two newcomers to the Panther schedule, will be met in succession on the 
next two weeks, with the season closing against Vermont at Burlington on November 16. 

Spring practices have been held throughout the past months and, including the dozen 
returning veterans, forty-three candidates have been on hand. Led by Captain-Elect 
Golembeski at a halfback position, Dawes, Ruggeri, and Leetc complete an experienced 
backfield. Lettermen available for the line include Brown, Cady, Clonan, Craig, For- 
bush, Hoffmann, Hoxie, MacLean and Westin. The remaining candidates are either 
upperclassmen who have not won their letters, or numeral men of last year’s strong 
freshman team. From the latter group much is expected with the possibility that, as in 
other years, Coaches Beck and Branch will be able to uncover men of potential ability. 


1935 SCHEDULE 

SEPTEMBER 1 8 — UNION AT MIDDLEBURY 
OCTOBER 5— WILLIAMS AT MIDDLEBURY 
OCTOBER 12— COAST GUARD AT NEW LONDON 
OCTOBER 1 9 — TUFTS AT MEDFORD 
OCTOBER 26— NORWICH AT MIDDLEBURY 
NOVEMBER 2— ST. LAWRENCE AT CANTON 
NOVEMBER 9— ITHACA AT MIDDLEBURY 
NOVEMBER 16— VERMONT AT BURLINGTON 



COMBINED MIDDLEBURY AND VERMONT BANDS PARADE AT THE HALF 


166 


V It O S II F O O T It A L I 


OFFICERS 


WALTER J. NELSON GEORGE A. ANDERSON ’38 

Coach Captain 

RICHARD F. DEMPEWOLFF ’36 JAMES A. LEACH *38 

Manager Assistant Manager 

JAMES A. MINER *38 
Assistant Manager 


NUMERAL MEN 


GEORGE A. ANDERSON 
THOMAS F. BAKER 
ROBERT J. BOEHM 
BERNARD H. BRUSSEAU 
RALPH CAMPAGNA 
JOHN CHALMERS 
JOHN E. CRIDLAND 
GEORGE E. FARRELL, JR. 
PAUL B. GUARNACCIA 
EDWARD C. HALLOCK 


CECIL C. LILJENSTEIN 
E. SHERBURNE LOVELL 
CHARLES S. POWELL 
CHARLES I. RAND 
ALBERT J. RICCIO 
RAEBURN B. STILES 
WILLIAM T. WATT 
DONALD H. WESTIN 
JOHN R. WILLIAMS 
FIELD H. WINSLOW 


SCHEDULE 

MIDDLEBURY o— ST. LAWRENCE 46 
MIDDLEBURY 7— UNION o 
MIDDLEBURY 1 5— VERMONT 6 



PRATT WILLIAMS CAMPAGNA BUSKEY KENT TEMPLE WEMPLE BRANDT FARRELL 
MANAGER DLMPKWOLIT LEACH POWELL GUARNACCIA STILES BAKER WINSLOW CRIDLAND HAYWARD 

HALLOCK MINER COACH NELSON 

RICCIO LILJENSTEIN WATT BRUSSEAU ANDERSON LOVELL RAND CHALMERS BOEHM 




l6 7 


SEASON 


F IK O S II F O O T IK A L L 


The Panther freshman football team played three games during the 1934 season. 
Victories were scored over Union and the University of Vermont and a crushing defeat 
was sustained at the hands of a powerful St. Lawrence eleven. Inexperience was a chief 
cause for the loss of the initial contest. 

Coach Nelson, with the aid of Victor J. Riccio, captain of last year’s varsity eleven, 
molded a first team out of the thirty candidates. The Warner double- wing back system 
was used offensively while the 6-3-2 formation was used on the defense. Just previous 
to the playing of the Vermont game, Anderson, right tackle, was elected captain. Much 
prospective varsity material was revealed by the excellent individual performances turned 
in during the last two encounters of the season. 

ST. LAWRENCE 

The Blue and White cubs lost their initial game on October 12 when they were 
defeated at Canton, N. Y., by the St. Lawrence University frosh. The speedy offensive 
and heavy line of the New Yorkers was too much for the inexperienced Middmen 
whose play was handicapped by fumbling and by a lack of good reserve strength. The 
St. Lawrence yearlings made seven touchdowns and four points after touchdown for 
a score of 46. The Panther frosh never seriously threatened the opposition goal. 

UNION 

Following a week of hard practice during which several changes were made in the 
first team and several new plays were tried, the Panther cubs defeated the Union 
yearlings by a 7-0 score. The Middmen, with an alert offensive and hard-hitting line, 
were markedly improved. 

Throughout the first half the Blue and White was almost always in Union territory. 
Liljenstein and Guarnaccia spun through the line for long gains and Chalmers gained 
many y'ards on the run-back of punts. The line opened large holes with Rand being 
particularly effective. However, a score was prevented by the tightening of the Maroon 
defense at the crucial moments. 

Immediately after the opening kickoff of the second half, the Panther yearlings 
started a 65-yard drive that culminated in a touchdown when Guarnaccia plunged 
across on an off-tackle spinner from the three-yard line. Two passes and several center 
rushes by Liljenstein featured this successful march. The game ended with Union trying 
desperately to score by shooting long passes. 

VERMONT 

On November 12, in the final and most important encounter of the season, the 
Panther frosh eleven defeated its traditional rival, the Vermont plebe team, by a 15-6 
count. Three weeks of steady practice had brought the Blue and White to near per- 
fection in thirty tricky spinners, reverses, end sweeps and passes. 

During the first quarter the Middmen completely baffled the Green and Gold kittens 
by a series of spectacular open-field runs. They failed to score, however, because of 
Vermont’s tight goal line defense, until the beginning of the second quarter. At this 
time Clark, the Vermont quarterback, fell on the pigskin behind his own goal line 
after Captain Anderson had blocked a punt on the 10-yard strip. After the Lake- 
siders had kicked off following the safety, the Blue and White swept to a touchdown 
with two long runs by Chalmers and Liljenstein’s plunge from the five-yard mark. 

In the last quarter the Middmen scored again after a Vermont kick had been blocked 
near mid-field. Boehm threw a 50-yard pass to Winslow, who caught the pigskin on 
the 10-yard line. On the next play Chalmers crossed the goal after taking another toss 
from Boehm. The game ended after the Catamounts had finally tallied by means of 
a series of long passes. 


16S 



It A S K i: T It A I. I 


OFFICERS 


BENJAMIN H. BECK 
Coach * 

CONRAD HOEHN ’36 
Co-Captain-Elect 

ROBERT T. STAFFORD ’35 
Manager 


M. PIERCE CLONAN ’36 
Captain 

JOHN H. MARTIN ’36 
Co-Captain-Elect 

HOWARD S. CADY ’36 
Manager-Elect 


LETTERMEN 


LESTER H. BENSON ’35 
ROBERT T. STAFFORD ’35 
M. PIERCE CLONAN ’36 
CONRAD HOEHN '3 6 


LAW RENCE F. LEETE ’36 
JOHN H. MARTIN ’36 
FRANCIS E. CLONAN ’37 
MILTON K.. LINS ’38 


SCHEDULE 

MIDDLEBURY 38— MCGILL 26 
MIDDLEBURY 5 2 — N. Y. STATE TEACHERS *8 
MIDDLEBURY 30— UNION 47 
MIDDLEBURY 41— NORTHEASTERN 35 
MIDDLEBURY 32— NORWICH 24 
MIDDLEBURY 40— ST. MICHAEL’S 23 
MIDDLEBURY 27— ST. MICHAEL’S 19 
MIDDLEBURY 40— VERMONT 20 
MIDDLEBURY 24— SPRINGFIELD 54 
MIDDLEBURY 33— W ILLIAMS 
MIDDLEBURY 34— NORW ICH 15 
MIDDLEBURY 54— COAST GUARD 29 
MIDDLEBURY 48— VERMONT 34 

WON 9— LOST 4 



COACH BECK POLLARD 
LON ERG AN 


ANDERSON 
I . CLONAN 


LINS BENSON ASSISTANT MANAGER CADY M A N AGER STA FI ORD 
HOEHN M. CLONAN MARTIN LEETE ZAVCISTOSKI 


169 


II A $ K E T IK A L L 


SEASON 

Led by Captain Clonan, the basketball quintet com- 
pleted a most successful season, winning the Green Moun- 
tain Conference title for the second consecutive year. 

With clcancut victories over McGill, Northeastern, Nor- 
wich, St. Michael’s, the University of Vermont and the 
United States Coast Guard Academy, and defeats by such 
strong aggregations as New York State Teacher’s Col- 
lege, Union, Springfield, and Williams, the Blue and 
White won 70 percent of its encounters. 

Coach Beck started the season with the Clonan 
brothers, Leete, Hoehn, Martin and Sweet, and built 
around these experienced men a powerful combination. 

The loss of Sweet by graduation in January was partially 
offset by the showing of Anderson and Lins, two promis- 
ing freshmen, who saw considerable action as the season 
progressed. Hoehn and Leete were the high scorers for 
the year with Captain Clonan close behind. These men 

clicked in numerous plays and showed the results of good coaching and teamwork. 
V hile not playing as spectacular a position, Martin and F. Clonan were the dependable 
mainstays of the Panthers defence, working desperately every minute of the play. 
Lins, a newcomer, displayed excellent possibilities for development as a speedy floor 
man and a high scorer. ith Benson, Zawistoski, Lonergan, Pollard and Anderson as 
reserves, the team had a strong roster of capable players. 

At every home game there was a packed audience, showing the interest and spirit 
of the students. As all home games were victories for the Panther combination, attend- 
ance was further stimulated. With a well-balanced, thoroughly coached team and 
strong student support, the Blue and White turned in the most creditable performance 
in recent years. 



CAPTAIN CLONAN 


MCGILL 

In the opening encounter of the year, the Blue and White overwhelmed the Scarlet 
of McGill by a 38-26 score. For the short training period which the Middlebury men 
had, they showed exceptional early season form. As was expected, their passes were 
a bit off form but strong work in other departments made up for this deficiency. A 
strong offense and a superior defense proved too much for the opposition. The Panthers 
led for the first few moments as the Canadians had trouble in finding the basket. The 
first half was slow with Middlebury lagging behind by one point at the opening of the 
second half. From then on the offense began to click and the Beckmcn surged ahead to 
win. Sweet was high scorer with fifteen points followed closely by Hoehn with twelve. 

NEW YORK STATE TEACHER’S COLLEGE 

Newcomers on Middlebury ’s schedule, the State Teachers upset the Beckmen in 
their initial encounter on the trip held prior to Christmas vacation. A scoring duel 
from start to finish, the Teachers had the better end of the struggle, winning 58-52. 
While both teams were weak on the defensive, the New Yorkers took every opportunity 
of scoring and turned them to their advantage. Murray was high scorer for the winners, 
with a total of twenty-six points, while Hoehn and Leete were high for the losers with 
fifteen each. 


UNION 

Exhausted from their encounter in Albany the previous night, the Panthers met the 
Union hoopsters on their home grounds at Schenectady and the Union quintet, repeat- 
ing its performance of last year, defeated Middlebury by a 47-30 score. Using its large 
reserve squad, the Garnet outplayed the Beckmen throughout. Semerard was high 


170 


■BASKET IB A I. I. 


scorer for Union with twelve points and Leete for Mid- 
dlcbury with thirteen. 

NORTHEASTERN 

Fresh from the Christmas vacation, the team traveled 
to Boston and upset all predictions by defeating North- 
eastern University at the Huntington Y. M. C. A. by 
a 41-35 score. Completely bewildering the Bostonians 
with a smashing offense, Middlebury held the opposition 
scoreless from the floor for the first twenty minutes of 
play and ended the half with 323-4 score in their favor. 
Hoehn and Leete were for the most part responsible for 
this first-half attack. The second half saw Northeastern 
open a powerful attack which netted them twenty-one 
points in the first ten minutes. The closing minutes 
of the encounter were fought on even terms with Mid- 
dlebury holding its slight lead till the end of the game. 
Hoehn was high scorer for Middlebury with thirteen 
Leete with twelve. 

NORWICH 

Opening the campaign for another Green Mountain Conference title, the Panther 
five defeated Norwich 32-24. Loss of Sweet by graduation and illness of two varsity 
men necessitated a changed line-up for the quintet. For the first few minutes of the 
encounter the game was even but the Beckmen broke the tie and maintained a lead over 
the Cadets throughout the remainder of the period to give Middlebury the advantage 
of a 19-12 score at the half. In the final period the Blue and White and the Cadets 
played on even terms with both teams battling for possession of the ball. The entire 
game was marked by slow action and loose playing. This game was the initial encounter 
for the first-year men, Anderson and Lins. Leete was high scorer for Middlebury 
with fifteen points. 

ST. MICHAEL’S 

Continuing its quest for the Conference title, the Panthers encountered St. Michael’s 
at Winooski. Both teams played poor basketball, offering a listless contest which Middle- 
bury won 41-23. St. Michael’s lack of organization was noticeable while the first team 
for Middlebury did not succeed as well as the second-string men. The first half ended 
with the Panthers leading 13-7 and showed little spectacular playing. The second half 
offered a rally which looked as if both teams were going to go into action for the 
remainder of the tilt, but the hopes of the spectators were short lived. Captain Clonan 
and Leete netted several spectacular shots, making the contest more lively at times. 
Hoehn was high scorer with thirteen points followed by Captain Clonan with nine. 

ST. MICHAEL’S 

For the second time in a week Middlebury defeated St. Michael’s, this time by a 
27-19 score. As in the previous encounter, both teams played a weak, loose game with 
the Blue and White’s teamwork surpassing that of St. Michael’s. The game opened in 
a lively fashion and prospects of a spirited contest loomed bright, but the spurt was 
soon ended. The end of the first half saw Middlebury leading 13-2. In the third 
quarter the Blue and White flashed brief moments of its capabilities and then dropped 
back to its man-to-man defense. Ruggiero closed up the gap in the score by dropping 
in several long shots and the game ended much more drably than it had started. Rug- 
giero was the outstanding man for St. Michael’s, scoring ten points, while Captain 
Clonan was high scorer for Middlebury with seven, followed by Hoehn with five. 



CAPTAIN-ELECT MARTIN 

points, closely followed by 




HANK ■: T II A I. I. 


VERMONT 

Gaining a firmer hold on the state title, the 
Panthers defeated the University of Vermont at 
McCullough Gymnasium by a 40-20 score in their 
next encounter. Looking like an entirely dif- 
ferent team than the one which had played St. 

Michael’s a few nights before, the Blue and White 
clicked perfectly. For the first ten minutes the 
play was completely in Middlebury ’s hands, but the 
Catamount soon got started and the contest was 
a lively one for the remaining thirty minutes. 

Middlebury completely outplayed the Green and 
Gold, using an effective system for both offense 
and defense, in contrast to the lack of team or- 
ganization Vermont showed. The score at the end 
of the first half was 20-7 in favor of the home 
team. In the second half, although the Green and 
Gold substituted an entirely new team, they were 
unable to stem the tide and Middlebury was not 
hard pressed for the remainder of the game. Hoehn 
was high scorer with thirteen points followed by Lins with seven. 

SPRINGFIELD 

Tired from its long ride and fatigued from colds contracted in the previous week, 
the Blue and White fell before one of the leading eastern quintets 54-24. The first 
half was fast at times but the team was obviously so weak that Coach Beck used 
his second string in the last period. Nuttal, crack Bay State forward, totaled twenty- 
four points for the winners while Captain Clonan and Hoehn shared honors for the losers. 

WILLIAMS 

Returning from Springfield, the Blue and White played at Williamstown with a 
flash of their regular style. In the first half Williams piled up a heavy lead as the Blue 
and White did not click and led the Panthers at the half 22-9. A second-half spurt, 
aided by the substitution of Lins, brought Middlebury within one point of tying the 
score but the Williams hoopsters again found the basket and piled up an impregnable 
lead. Hoehn and Leete found their scoring eye in a closing rally but could not overcome 
the advantage Williams had piled up. The final count was 42-33. Navins and Sheehan 
were tied for high honors on the Williams team while Hoehn and Leete were high scorers 
for the Panther quintet. 



COACH BECK 


NORWICH 

Breaking again into the winning column and coming closer to the state title, the 
Beckmen romped to a 34-15 victory over an obviously weak Norwich quintet. While 
both teams played inferior ball, it was Norwich’s pitiable offensive and weak defense 
which enabled Middlebury to make such a good showing on the score books. At the end 
of the first half Middlebury was leading 20-4, due largely to Captain Clonan who col- 
lected eight of the twenty counters scored. In the second half Norwich desperately 
attempted to make long shots from any angle of the floor and was matched, shot for 
shot, by the Panther offense. Hoehn and the Clonan brothers were the high scorers 
for the evening. 


COAST GUARD 

Showing a marked improvement over its play with Norwich, Middlebury swamped 
the Coast Guard Cadets 54-29 on the McCullough court. Although the Blue and 


17* 



■CASK i: I IK A I. L 


White experienced difficulty in getting started, it 
unleashed its greatest scoring barrage of the season 
to lead 34-16 at the half. Every Middlebury man 
in the game during the first half scored at least 
once. In the second stanza, the Beckmen lost no 
time in getting started and piled up an imposing 
score with Captain Clonan and Lins finding the 
basket frequently. The defense worked so well 
that the Guardsmen were forced to content them- 
selves with long shots from the center of the floor. 
Captain Clonan, Hoehn, Leete and Lins all piled up 
high scores lor Middlebury, collecting forty-seven 
points between them. Waldron was the outstand- 
ing player for the Cadets. 

VERMONT 

Putting the final touches on a successful season, 
the Blue and White traveled to Burlington and 
soundly trounced the Catamounts 48-34 to win the 
Conference championship for the second consecu- 
tive year. In the first period Middlebury completely bewildered Vermont, leading them 
by thirteen points at the end of the first half. While the second period was not as 
spectacular as the Erst, the Panthers spurted ahead whenever seriously pressed. Although 
substitutions were used freely by both teams, the fast floor work never stopped for a 
moment. Hoehn piled up his highest game score of the year, totaling twenty-two 
points, and was followed by Captain Clonan and Lins with nine tallies each. 



CAPTAIN- F. LECT HOEHN 


c 11 e 1: 11 l e a 11 e 11 s 



VkU.LIAMS BOYCE PECK STARTUP 


173 



II O V k K V 


OFFICERS 


WALTER J. NELSON 
Coach 

MALCOLM M. SWF.TT ’36 
Captain-Elect 

HENRY H. KIRWIN ’36 
Manager-Elect 


HENRY F. MACLEAN ’36 
Captain 

LESTER H. BENSON ’35 
Manager 


LETTER MEN 


ROGER M. BAKEY ’35 HENRY F. MACLEAN *36 

LESTER H. BENSON ’35 JOHN E. NASH ’36 

HILLES R. PICKENS, JR., ’33 MALCOLM M. SWETT ’36 

ANGUS M. BROOKS ’36 G. WILBUR WESTIN *36 

J. WILLIAM DAWES ’36 G. DUDLEY PHINNEY ’37 


SCHEDULE 

MIDDLEBURY 8— AM ARON HOCKEY CLUB o 
MIDDLEBURY 5— WILLIAMS 8 
MIDDLEBURY 1— HAMILTON 3 
MIDDLEBURY 4— UNION 1 
MIDDLEBURY 3— ARMY 1 
MIDDLEBURY o— DARTMOUTH 6 
MIDDLEBURY 1— COLGATE 2 
MIDDLEBURY 1— WILLIAMS 6 

WON 3— LOST 5 



FOSTER SWETT GROBY WESTIN PICKINS MOORE 
COAC H NELSON PHINNEY BAKEY MACLEAN BROOKS DAWES NASH 


174 


ii o c k i: v 


SEASON 

Middlebury was represented on the ice this year by a well-trained sextet that kept 
every game a -contest until the very end and skated through an eight-game schedule 
with a record of three wins and five losses. 

Faced with the problem of filling front line and goal vacancies left by graduation, 
Coach Nelson did well with the material on hand. Receiving an even break from the 
weather man, the Blue and hite was able to practice fairly consistently throughout 
the season and showed the benefits of this in the course of its contests. Though out- 
skated in most of its games, the Panther made up for this by calling upon an extensive 
repertoire of potential scoring plays that kept the opposition guessing and the puck 
largely in offensive territory. A galaxy of criss-cross, drop pass, and corner plays made 
the Middlebury offense, for the understanding observer, a nice thing to watch. 

Insufficient front-line man power was the Panther handicap all season. With only 
one first-class line to use. Coach Nelson was forced to substitute individuals rather than 
lines against two and sometimes three complete strings of the opposition. Tiring Panther 
forwards found themselves time and again, in the closing minutes of contests, unable 
to stem the freshened tide of their opponents. 

The first forward line was usually composed of Dawes, Phinney, and either Brooks 
or Swett, with the odd man teaming up with Westin and Pickens on the second string. 
The defense was the same as last year with the veteran pair of Captain MacLean and 
Bakey doing a yeoman job of breaking up enemy advances. For the breach in the goal 
Coach Nelson developed Nash, who came through in the later games of the schedule 
with some splendid performances. 

AMARON HOCKEY CLUB 

Middlebury *s initial encounter brought an easy victory for the Panther when a weak 
Amaron Hockey Club, the unofficial representative of the American International Col- 
lege, was downed 8-0 on the McCullough rink. 

The ice was fast and Middlebury easily had the better of the contest all the way 
through. Swett and Phinney were the kingpins of the Panther attack with the former 
grabbing off four goals and the latter two. Brooks and Captain MacLean each scored 
a goal apiece and Dawes was credited with two assists. The strength of the Panther 
defense was hardly tested. Most of the time Middlebury played five men up with the 
result that the Panther goalie was called upon for only six saves in the course of the 
entire contest as against thirty-nine for the opposing net minder. The weakness of 
the opposition made the game an ideal one for an opener with Middlebury, after running 



COACH M I SON 


< APT AIN MAC LEAN 


175 


ii o v k ■; v 


up a substantial lead, experimenting with its possible 
scoring plays. 

WILLIAMS 

In the second home game of the season Middle- 
bury met a fast Williams team, strong in man power 
and went down to defeat 8-5 in a hectic, action- 
packed contest. The issue was by no means settled 
until the very end with Middlebury coming back 
time after time and always presenting a serious 
threat. 

Dawes and Brooks tallied for the Blue and White 
to knot the count at two all at the end of the first 
stanza. The second frame, however, spelled doom 
for the Panther hopes as Williams came back with 
three goals in the course of two minutes. The last 
period, like the first, was about even with both teams 
tiring rapidly. Middlebury stood up well under the 
strain with Brooks counting unassisted for the first 
Middlebury score of the stanza. Phinney took a pass 
from Dawes four minutes later for the second goal and MacLean scored the last tally on 
a solo dash for the length of the rink. 



HAMILTON 

Journeying to Clinton, N. Y., four days later, the Panther, tired from the long trip, 
skated out on the Hamilton rink to lose a close contest 3-1. 

The New York team had taken full advantage of the benefits offered in the way 
of practice by its indoor rink and outplayed the Panther for the first two periods. Their 
scoring was evenly divided, however, as they grabbed off a goal in each of the three 
periods. Middlebury *s lone tally came when Swett drove a long shot in from the blue 
line during the closing minutes of the contest. 

UNION 

In its last home game of the season, the Blue and White showed the best hockey a 
Middlebury team has displayed in several years to handily outplay Union 4-1. 

Union scored first after three-quarters of the initial period, but Swett evened things 
up in the next stanza on an unassisted drive from the left boards. Phinney tallied 
twice in five minutes of play during the last period and Westin entwined the final 
Panther counter on a flat pass from Pickens. Middlebury ’s passwork had the Garnet 

guessing throughout all of the contest with the playing of Jenkins of the New York 

Staters being the only bright spot in their offensive. 

ARMY 

For its 3-1 win over Army at West Point, Middlebury deserves more credit than 
for any other game of the season. Playing on a foreign rink and overcoming a one-goal 
deficit, the Panther showed its true calibre. 

Splendid physical condition and consistent, intelligent team play was the deciding 
factor. Army scored first from a scramble in front of the Panther net midway 

through the first period, but from then on the game was all Middlebury. Dawes 

retaliated before the stanza closed and Swett lined in one of his blue line specialties 
during the following period. The final score came about ten minutes from the end 
when Phinney climaxed a solo through the whole Soldier team by feinting the goalie 
out of position to pop the rubber into the net. Captain MacLean was outstanding 
defensively. 


176 



II O C k K V 



DARTMOUTH 

In Dartmouth, Middlebury met a far superior 
sextet and went down to defeat at Hanover by a 6- o 
count in the only game in which the Panther failed 
to tally. 

The Big Green was just too much for the Blue 
and White to handle and that tells the story. Gui- 
bord and Allen of the Indian squad stick-handled 
and passed circles around the Panther and gave Nash 
in the Blue and White net plenty to remember. 
Dawes and Phinney turned in the best performances 
for Middlebury. 


COLGATE 

Journeying next to Colgate, the Blue and White 
lost again, this time on a last-period goal in a close 


manager benson contest. The score was 2-1. 

For two periods Middlebury outplayed the 
Maroon with the score standing tied at one goal apiece at the end of the second stanza. 
Phinney took a pass from Brooks for the Middlebury tally. Time and again the Panther 
forwards were in close on Billings in the enemy net, but the goalie-captain turned 
them back with a record of twenty-five saves during the contest. The final score that 
doomed the Panthers came on a play from McDonnough to Wood in the closing minutes 
and Middlebury returned home, outscored but not outplayed. 


WILLIAMS 

In a vain attempt to overcome its earlier loss to the Purple of Williams, the Blue 
and White closed its season by falling 6-1 at Williamstown. 

Poor ice conditions hampered both sextets but the Williams man power was again 
an important factor in its victory. Middlebury played the Purple on even terms during 
the first period but heavy penalties during the following stanzas kept down any chances 
of Panther scoring. Towards the end of the second period Westin tallied the only 
Panther goal from a scramble in front of the Purple net. The rest of the contest saw 
Williams, led by Mosely, keeping five men well up in Middlebury territory. 


PROSPECTS FOR 1935 

With graduation this year taking only a meagre toll of two lettermen from next 
season’s hockey, squad, the outlook can be safely expressed as exceedingly good. With 
his new men now firmly founded in the essentials and some of the finer points of ice 
play, Coach Nelson can be expected to turn out a finished product in every sense of 
the word. 

The men who will be missed are the veterans Bakey on the defense and Pickens at 
a wing position. However, Nash will be back in the nets to show what he has learned 
from his first year of organized hockey, MacLean will hold down his customary left 
defense berth, and the forward lines can be selected from the impressive veteran list 
composed of Captain Swett, Phinney, Dawes, Brooks and Westin. The other defense 
post presents a problem with Groby, who saw service in several contests this past season, 
offering a possible solution. 


177 


It A S i; It A I. I 


m 


OFFICERS 


WALTER J. NELSON 
Coach 

HARRY S. BARKER ’35 
Co-Captain -Elect 


EDW ARD W\ STEFAN I AK ’34 
Captain 

JOSEPH J. ZAWISTOSKI ’35 
Co-Captain-Elect 


ROBERT L. CUSHING ’34 LELAND O. HUNT ’33 

Manager Manager-Elect 

LETTERMEN 

ROBERT L. CUSHING ’34 JOSEPH J. ZAWTSTOSKI ’33 

EDWARD W. STEFANI AK ’34 CONRAD HOEHN ’36 

EMANUEL M. ZIEGLER ’34 RALPH H. MEACHAM ’36 

ROGER M. BAKEY ’35 JOHN E. NASH ’3 6 

HARRY S. BARKER *35 G. DUDLEY PHINNEY ’37 

RUDOLPH V. BONA ’33 


SCHEDULE 


MIDDLEBURY 

3— UNION 6 

MIDDLEBURY 

3— UPSALA 5 

MIDDLEBURY 

1 z — PANZER 8 

MIDDLEBURY 

3— ARMY 10 

MIDDLEBURY 

13— VERMONT 3 

MIDDLEBURY 

8— ST. MICHAEL’S 10 

MIDDLEBURY 

7— NORWICH 4 

MIDDLEBURY 

3— VERMONT 6 

MIDDLEBURY 

1— BROWN 11 

MIDDLEBURY 

0— TUFTS 4 

MIDDLEBURY 

3— BOSTON COLLEGE 17 

MIDDLEBURY 

10— NORTHEASTERN 11 

MIDDLEBURY 

3— ST. LAWRENCE 7 

MIDDLEBURY 

3— NORWICH z 

MIDDLEBURY 

5— ST. MICHAEL’S 7 


W ON 4— LOST 10— TIED 1 



MEACHAM PHINNEY LABOUCHLRE WILLIAMS DUMAS 
COACH NELSON BAKEY BARKER STEFA N IA K ZIEGLER HOEHN ZAWISTOSKI 




178 


K A S K II A I. I. 


SEASON 

It was largely a veteran nine that carried Middlebury ’s colors throughout the 1934 
season, completing a schedule of fifteen games with a record of four victories, one tie, 
and ten defeats. 

The pitching assignment for the Panther rested on the shoulders of Captain 
Stefaniak, Barker and Anderson with Guild, Herbert, and Hochn also seeing service. 
The infield usually showed Hoehm holding down the initial sack, Zawistoski at second, 
Nash at third, and Meacham at shortstop. The outfield was patrolled by Barker, Phin- 
ney, Bakey, Dumas, Bona, and Ward, with the first three named seeing the most action. 
Ziegler handled the ball behind the plate. 

NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY TRIP 

Middlebury played its first few minutes of the season like a professional ball club. 
Completely surprising Union, the Panther scored twice in the first inning and twice 
again in the third. Stefaniak held the New Yorkers scoreless until the fourth when 
the opposition annexed its first counter. The fifth and sixth innings proved to be 
fast moving and prolific. The Panthers chalked up another run, but Union had a 
batting spree and succeeded in bringing the score to 6-5 in its favor. Both teams failed 
to count in the remaining stanzas of the game, the final score being 6-5 for Union. 

The following day, the Middmen again found themselves against stiff opposition. 
A slippery field hindered the playing of both teams and errors were numerous. Ander- 
son twirled for the Blue and White and kept the hits well scattered. Most of the 
scoring was done through poor fielding of both aggregations. At the end of the fifth 
inning with the score at a 5-5 deadlock, the officials called the game because of increasing 
rain. 

A strong Panzer nine bowed to Middlebury and gave the team its first victory of the 
season. With the pep first evidenced in the opening of the Union encounter the 
Panther raced off to a mad attack, clouting five runs in the first three innings and 
three more in the fifth. Anderson started on the mound and was replaced by Guild 
when Panzer commenced a batting spree. Five runs were chalked up for the opposition 
before the onslaught was finally stopped by Stefaniak, who replaced Guild. Panzer 
tallied again in the sixth, but this was overshadowed by four more counters in the eighth 
and ninth for the Blue and White. The final score stood 12-8 in Middlebury *s favor. 

A heavy-hitting, superior Army nine met the Panther at West Point for the last 
encounter of the tour. The flashy pitching of Segrist, cadet star twirler, completely 



CAPTAIN STEFANIAK COACH NELSON MANAGER CUSHING 


179 




II A S E II A I. E 


baffled the Middmen. The West Pointers scored two 
runs on several singles and consequent errors made 
in the infield. The Blue and White tied the count 
with a single by Barker coupled with wild tossing 
in the Army infield. The fifth inning featured a 
hard-hitting rally by the cadets and they scored five 
runs. A bad muff by an Army outfielder gave 
Middlebury her third tally, but the West Pointers 
added three more counts in the eighth to make the 
final score 10-3. 

VERMONT 

After the mediocre showing of their opening 
trip, the Middmen hurtled into a flying start in the 
Green Mountain Conference title race by decisively 
defeating Vermont. A slightly altered line-up proved 
to be a strong defensive combination. Fifteen hits 
were gathered from three Vermont pitchers while 
Captain Stefaniak had little trouble in keeping the 
Lakeside batters impotent. Every man in the Pan- 
ther line-up contributed at least one bingle to the shower of hits. Zawistoski started 
things off in the fourth by walloping one over the fence for a home run. In the last 
of the fourth \ ermont staged a rally that proved to be short-lived but two Green and 
Gold tallies were gained in the fifth. The Blue and White scored the last count in the 
ninth as the result of a walk and another single. The game ended 13-3 with the 
Panther on top. 

ST. MICHAEL’S 

A two weeks layoff after the Vermont killing proved disastrous for Middlebury. 
The Middmen went down to defeat to St. Michael’s in a galaxy of errors by the score 
of 10-8. The Mikemen gained a total of thirteen hits from Stefaniak and Guild and 
Middlebury chalked up the same number of hits. Circuit clouts by Phinney and Ste- 
faniak were the only bright spots in the Middlebury performance. A total of six errors 
for the Blue and White made this exhibition of baseball a sorry sight. Hoskiewicz 
climaxed a brilliant pitching performance by fanning three Panther batters in the last 
stanza. 



CO-CAPTAIN-ELECT BARKER 




NORWICH 

Incensed by the unexpected defeat at the hands of St. Michael’s, the Middmen rose 
to the occasion and downed Norwich by a score of 7-4 on Porter Field. The game 
was slow and uninteresting with only a few lively innings. Zawistoski led the batters 
with three safe hits. Anderson twirled for the Blue and White, but numerous errors 
tended to keep the score close. Middlebury surged into an early lead and kept it 
throughout the contest. The ninth passed without any scoring and the final tally stood 
7-4 in Middlebury ’s favor. 

VERMONT 

Another spiritless performance on the part of Middlebury spelled defeat from the 
hands of Vermont by the score of 6-5. Vermont gained an early lead and it was not 
until the ninth that they were threatened. A final-inning rally by the Blue and White 
in which four runs were registered just fell short of overcoming the Catamount lead. 
Guild walked ten men through the course of the contest. Twice the bases were loaded 
and twice the Guild-Ziegler-Hoehn combination worked a double play to save Middle- 

1 80 



II A S i: II A I. I 


bury from being completely overwhelmed. Meacham 
scored the first Middlebury tally in the sixth on a 
sacrifice by Zawistoski. The Green and Gold scored 
in the first half of the ninth, and the Panther at- 
tempted a comeback in its final turn at bat. Five 
hits registering four runs were not enough to break 
the early lead gained by Vermont. 

MASSACHUSETTS TRIP 

The Boston tour ended in four defeats for the 
Blue and White. Leaving with a serious lack of 
pitchers, the hopes of the Middlebury team were 
small from the start. The Brown aggregation com- 
pletely outplayed the Middmen, scoring five runs 
in the first inning. Stefaniak yielded seven runs, 
and was replaced by Herbert, who had three chalked 
up against him in the sixth and one more in the 
eighth inning. The Panthers’ lone run came in the 
sixth when Bakey singled and then scored on a wild 
throw by the Brown pitcher. The score was ii-i. 

The Panthers displayed a better brand of ball playing at Medford against the 
Jumbos. Captain Stefaniak pitched faultlessly and was well supported by his team- 
mates. The opposition secured six hits to Middlebury ’s five but the Tufts team bunched 
their safeties in one inning and won 4-0. 

Middlebury was seriously handicapped in its encounter with the Eagles by the fact 
that it had no available pitcher. Hoehn, regular first baseman, tried his luck on the 
mound but the heavy hitters of the Boston College nine proved too much for him. 
Reputed to have some of the best hitters in the East, Boston had little trouble in swamp- 
ing the Blue and White 17-3. 

Against Northeastern, the Middlebury nine played its stubbornest brand of ball. 
It was a hard-hitting game on the part of both teams. In the first inning Bakey 
smashed out a home run, three singles followed, driving the Husky hurler to the showers. 
Phinney banged the first ball thrown by the new pitcher for a two-base hit and three 
more runs were garnered by the Middmen before they were retired. A furious batting 
barrage staged in the sixth and seventh placed Northeastern in the lead. The Blue and 
White scored five runs on two hits in the eighth when the Northeastern infield turned 
in error after error, but the game ended 1 1-10 in favor of the Huskies. 

ST. LAWRENCE 

St. Lawrence scored 37- 5 triumph over Middlebury, although outhit by the Pan- 
thers. Four errors by the Blue and White told the tale of defeat. A good piece of 
relief hurling by Barker, and hard hitting by Barker, Zawistoski, Stefaniak, and Bakey 
featured for Middlebury. 



CO-CAPTAIN-ELECT ZAWISTOSKI 


NORWICH 

Norwich was nosed out 3-2 when Barker held the Horsemen to six bingles. 
Labouchere led the Panther batsmen with three safe hits. This victory completed the 
last of the four wins for the 1934 Middlebury nine. 

ST. MICHAEL’S 

The last game of the season was played at Porter Field as a feature of the senior 
week festivities. The encounter was entirely in the hands of the men from Winooski, 
and Middlebury was outhit and outplayed, although a last-inning rally nearly overcame 
the early lead established by the Mikemen. The final count was 7-5 in favor of 
St. Michael’s. 


181 



T IK A t K 


OFFICERS 


ARTHUR M. BROWN 
Coach 


LESTER H. LOVELL ’34 
Captain 


PHILIP H. MATHEWSON ’35 CARL M. LORENZ ’34 

Captain-Elect Manager 

DONALD S. BROWN ’35 
Manager-Eleft 


LETTER MEN 


LESTER H. LOVELL ’34 
CARL M. LORENZ ’34 
JAMES L. SEARS ’34 
CARL W. SEYMOUR ’34 
HAROLD D. WATSON ’34 
WALTER E. BOEHM ’35 
FRANCIS H. CADY ’35 
FRANK LOMBARDY ’35 


PHILIP H. MATHEWSON ’35 
RICHARD L. WILLIAMS ’35 
RICHARD O. FORBUSH ’36 
ELWOOD A. FIOXIE ’36 
JOHN H. MARTIN ’36 
RANDALL W. HOFFMANN ’37 
KENNETH W. MACFADYEN ’37 


SCHEDULE 

M 1 DDLEBURY 80— R. P. I. 45 
MIDDLEBURY 63— WILLIAMS 72 
MIDDLEBURY 16— EASTERN INTERCOLLEGIATES 
MIDDLEBURY 62— MONTREAL A. A. A. 64 
MIDDLEBURY 65— GREEN MOUNTAIN CONFERENCE 

WON 2— LOST 3 



WORDSWORTH HOFFMANN HILL LABOUCHERF. HARD FOSTER BROOKER 
MANAGER LORENZ ASSISTANT MANAGER BROWN WHITNEY SHEA MARTIN MATHEWSON BERNARDINI 
MACFADYEN CADY COACH BROWN TRAINER FARRELL 
PROCHAZKA SEYMOUR WILLIAMS HOXIE LOVELL FORBUSH WATSON 


182 



T K A 1 k 


SEASON 

The 1934 track team, winners for the sixth successive year of the Green Mountain 
Conference championship, had a successful season. In the opening meet they swamped 
R. P. L, blanketing them under a lead of thirty-five points. The runners then met a 
series of fast competitors and some bad breaks. They lost their three mid-season 
encounters, dropping to fourth place in the Eastern Intercollegiates, and losing by 
nine points to a powerful Williams aggregation. Montreal A. A. A. barely edged 
the Panther by a two-point margin in a meet marked by brilliant Middlebury perform- 
ances, unbacked by secondary strength. 

Working with a number of lettermen from the last year’s undefeated team and 
with excellent new material sifted from a group of eighty-six candidates, Coach Brown 
developed a fast although somewhat spotty team. A lack of reserve men to garner 
points in the secondary positions was the main weakness. Of the lettermen Mathew- 
son turned in the most dependable performance, taking first in the low hurdles in every 
meet. In the dashes Hoxie was equally valuable. MacFadyen, a freshman, ably filled 
the mile assignment left vacant by graduation. In the latter part of the season, he 
moved into the half-mile and was successful there also. Boehm and Forbush competed 
in the middle distances and Sears and Brooker divided the honors in the two-mile grind. 

Work in the field events was less spectacular. Captain Lovell, however, covered the 
javelin throw credibly, Cady consistently came out on top in the broad jump, while 
Lombardy outthrew most of his opponents in the discus. The vacancy in the pole vault 
was filled by Hoffmann, and Watson and Whitney twirled the hammer. 

RENSSELAER 

Traveling to R. P. I. for the first engagement of the season, the Panther trackmen 
completely outclassed their opponents. Of the fourteen events run off Middlebury 
took firsts in ten and tied in two more, giving them victory by the wide margin of 
80-45. The Tech team was composed of almost entirely new material and, despite 
intensive training, failed to click against the superior Blue and White. 

Poor track conditions, due to the earliness of the season, and a strong head wind, 
prevented either team from functioning at its best and there was little spectacular 
performance. Hoxie, with ten points, was high scorer for Middlebury, annexing first in 
the hundred, and tying with Boehm for a like position in the 440. Mathewson turned 
in his usual first place in the low hurdles, followed by Martin in second place. Mac- 
Fadyen and Brooker took the mile and two-mile grinds, respectively. Forbush accounted 





183 




T II A V k 


for the 880, while Jocelyn brought the Panther into 
the winning column in the 220. 

In the field events Middlebury gained twenty- 
eight points. Lovell and Williams placed first and 
third in the javelin; Lombardy, Evans and Whitney 
shut out the Trojans in the discus; and Cady and 
Williams outdistanced their opponents in the broad 
jump; while Hoffmann tied with his opponent of the 
Garnet in the pole vault. 

WILLIAMS 

The following week the Blue and White received 
its first defeat since the 1932 season at the hands of 
a strong Williams team. The Panthers were strong 
in the track events but comparative weakness in the 
field enabled the Purple to avenge last year’s defeat 
by the narrow margin of 72-63. 

Two new college records were set in the keen 
competition. Mathewson broke his own previous 
record in the low hurdles, and Cady bettered the 
former mark in the broad jump. Hoxie was again high scorer for the Panthers, taking 
firsts in both sprints. Williams practically swept the field events, placing firsts in the 
shot put, discus, high jump, pole vault and javelin. Watson, however, annexed the 
hammer throw, while Cady and Williams took the broad jump to save the Blue and 
White from a complete shutout. 

The home team showed more strength in the running events, taking all but three 
events. Hoxie, Cady and Foster left only two thirds to the Purple in the sprints, while 
Forbush took the 880 and MacFadyen the mile. The low hurdles were won by 
Mathewson. 



MANAGER LORENZ 


EASTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE A. A. 

Middlebury, defending champion at Worcester on May 12 in the Eastern Inter- 
collegiates, was unable to hold its position and yielded first honors to Rhode Island 
State, dropping to fourth position. Fast competition and bad breaks accounted for 
the weak showing. Several freshmen, consistent winners for the Panther this season, 
were unable to compete due to the rule barring first-year men. Three individual cham- 
pions of last year, Prochazka, Cady and Sears, failed to maintain their places. 

Mathewson starred for the Panthers, taking first in his favorite event, the low 
hurdles, for the only Middlebury individual championship. Hoxie personally accounted 
for six points and was high scorer for the Blue, when he took second in both sprints. 
Forbush in the 880, Boehm in the 440, and Lombardy in the discus each took a fourth 
to complete Middlebury’s tally of sixteen points. 

MONTREAL A. A. A. 

Middlebury’s track men were barely nosed out by the Canadian club in a meet at 
Montreal, May 16, by a score of 64-62. Although they swept first place in seven of 
the fourteen events and tied in an eighth, the Panthers lost because of a lack of backing 
in the secondary positions. 

The most outstanding single performance was made by MacFadyen when he won 
the mile by a good sixty yards, breaking a college record for the event which had stood 
for nineteen years. Hoxie and Mathewson also continued their excellent work, the 
former in the sprints, the latter in the hurdles. The middle distance runs were con- 
ceded to the Canadians, Boehm dropping to third in the 440 and Forbush to second in 
the half-mile. In the field Middlebury completely shut out their opponents in the 


1 84 


T II A <’ k 






javelin throw with Williams, Lovell, and Erkilla plac- 
ing. Cady continued his successful defense of the 
broad jump and Lombardy took the discus. 

GREEN MOUNTAIN CONFERENCE 

Returning to the winning column to complete 
their 1934 season, the Panthers captured the G. M. C. 
championship in the annual home meet held at 
Porter Field May 26. Appearing for the second 
time at home, the Middmen, with a score of 69 
points, easily outdistanced Vermont with 45 and 
Norwich with 21. 

Competition was keener than the scores indi- 
cate. Favored with perfect weather and a well- 
conditioned track, ten new Conference and two new 
college records were established. McGuire of Nor- 
wich was high scorer for the meet with two firsts 
and a second in the weight events. Mathewson and 
MacFadyen for Middlebury were close behind with 
ten points each. 

In the short-distance running R. Delfausse of Vermont took the 100 and 220, 
closely followed by Hoxie in both events. Mathewson captured the 120-yard high 
hurdles in 15.2 seconds for a new college and Conference record and set a new Con- 
ference record in winning the low barriers in 25.2 seconds. MacFadyen won the half- 
mile in 1:59 f° r a new college and Conference record and also established a new Confer- 
ence mark of 4:37.2 in the mile run. Forbush placed second in the 880 and Seymour 
took second in the mile. Harwood of Vermont took the two-mile grind followed by 
Sears and Brooker of Middlebury. 

Other Panther winners were Cady in the broad jump, Lombardy in the discus throw. 
Lovell in the javelin, and Hoffmann in the pole vault. 



MANACIR-ELECT BROW N 


1935 SCHEDULE 

APRIL 17 — WESLEYAN AT MIDDLETOWN 

MAY 4— WILLIAMS AT WILLIAMSTOWN 

MAY 11— MONTREAL A. A. A. AT MIDDLEBURY 

MAY 18 — E. I. C. A. A. AT WORCESTER 

MAY 24, 25— N. E. I. C. A. A. AT PORTLAND 

MAY 30— GREEN MOUNTAIN CONFERENCE AT BURLINGTON 






185 


Jr 


I \ II O O It 


it i: i. a v 


The indoor relay team, participating in a field relatively new to Middlebury’s 
athletic program, definitely established its position by capturing the Canadian National 
championship in the final meet of the season. The team participated in three other 
meets against leading colleges of the East and succeeded in capturing two second and 
one third places. 

The relaymen took second place in the opening match of the season at the Millrose 
games at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The Panther quartet bettered 
the Middlebury College record for the mile relay event by four seconds but were nosed 
out by a powerful Amherst team. Lafayette finished in third position. 

At the Boston A. A. meet the following week the Blue and White runners, handi- 
capped by the illness of several members of the squad, were forced to take third position 
behind the teams of Amherst and Bowdoin. The University Club of Boston meet 
found the Panther quartet in greatly improved condition and the Middlebury men, 
although again outdistanced by the Amherst four, clearly displayed their superiority over 
the representatives of all other New England colleges in the class B competition. 

Running against the Achilles Club of Toronto, the Montreal A. A., and McGill 
University in the final meet of the year, the Blue and White won the Canadian national 
championship in a new record of 3:31 for the Canadian track. Mathewson, matched 
against outstanding competitors, took third in his favorite hurdles event. 


MEMBERS 

WALTER E. BOEHM ’35 ELWOOD A. HOXIE ’3 6 

PHILIP H. MATHEWSON ’35 KENNETH W. MACFADYEN ’37 

RICHARD O. FORBUSH ’3 6 



i 




r ii oss- c o i x t ii v 


The varsity cross-country team ended its season with a record of two wins and three 
losses. 

The schedule opened against the harriers of Connecticut State over the local course 
wdth the Blue and White losing by the close margin of one point, 27-28. State finished 
two men before Middlebury’s first man, MacFadyen, crossed the line. The following 
w'eek the Panther journeyed to Williamstown to avenge last year’s defeat at the hands 
of the Purple and wdn by a 26-29 score. Seven of the first ten men to cross the line 
w'ere Middlebury runners, w'ith MacFadyen and Meacham taking second and third, 
respectively, behind Gregory of the opposition. 

Against R. P. I. the Panther won handily by a 21-34 count wdth MacFadyen captur- 
ing first place and Meacham second. Meeting Union the next week, however, it w^as 
a different story as the Blue and White lost, 22-33. Nestle of the Garnet captured 
first, flashing to a new Schenectady course record. MacFadyen followed in the second 
spot. In the final meet of the year, Middlebury lost the Green Mountain Conference 
title as it fell before the Vermont runners by a 26-29 score. The race was run over 
the local course with Woodruff of the Green and Gold taking first, and MacFadyen, 
Tilford and Gross placing first, third, and fifth for Middlebury. 


OFFICERS 


ARTHUR M. BROWN RALPH H. MEACHAM ’36 

Coach Captain 

KENNETH W. MACFADYEN ’37 JAMES S. MILLAR *35 

Captain-Elect Manager 

CECIL B. GODDARD ’36 
Manager-Elect 


LETTERMEN 


I AMES S. MILLAR ’35 
MALCOLM E. GROSS ’36 
RALPH H. MEACHAM ’36 
ARCHIBALD C. TILFORD ’36 
WALTER E. BROOKER ’37 


RICHARD A. HARD ’37 
KENNETH W. MACFADYEN ’37 
WATSON E. WORDSWORTH ’37 
WINSTON R. WORDSWORTH ’37 


SCHEDULE 


MIDDLEBURY 28 — CONNECTICUT STATE 27 
MIDDLEBURY 26— WILLIAMS 29 
MIDDLEBURY 21— R. P. I. 34 
MIDDLEBURY 33— UNION 22 
MIDDLEBURY 29— VERMONT 26 



COACH BROWN ASSISTANT M A NAGER GODDARD POLL ARD HARD MANAGER MILLAR 
WORDSWORTH MACFADYEN MEACHAM GROSS TILFORD 


187 



F It O $ II r It OSS- C O I > T It V 


The 1938 freshman cross-country team lost its only encounter of the year to the 
University of Vermont first-year aggregation by a score of 18-37. The contest was 
run over Middlebury’s three-and-a-half-mile course on November 17. 

Coach Brown called out freshman candidates early in the fall and put them through 
an intensive conditioning program in the weeks preceding their only contest. However, 
this was more for the purpose of giving the men experience for the time when they 
could become varsity candidates than training for any particular meet. 

After a number of grueling trial runs, the Panther yearling harriers met Vermont 
on a rainy day under extremely poor course conditions. Lamb, the most promising of 
the Blue and White freshmen, secured third place against a speedy, experienced Green 
and Gold team which sent Lafson and Steele to the tape in a tie for first place. Swan 
and Beebe were the next Middlebury men to cross the line, taking ninth and tenth 
places, respectively. They were closely followed by Smith, Lawrence, and Riccio of the 
Blue and White. 


OEFICERS 


ARTHUR M. BROWN JAMES S. MILLAR ’35 

Coach Manager 

CECIL B. GODDARD *3 6 
Assistant-Manager 


NUMERAL MEN 

ALLISON S. BEEBE ’38 
WILFRED B. BORLAND ’38 
GEORGE W. LAMB ’38 
L. ROBERT LAWRENCE ’38 


ALFRED RICCIO ’38 
JOHN R. SMITH ’38 
THOMAS W. SWAN ’38 



ASSISTANT MAN ACER GODDARD BROWN BUNNELL COACH BROWN SMITH ROWELL BORLAND MANAGER MILLAR 

BEEBE LAWRENCE LAMB RICCIO 


188 


n i \ t i: ii 


S V O II T S 


The new ski jump and downhill course on Chipman Hill gave fresh impetus to 
interest in snow sports this year. Despite lack of experience and adequate training, 
the winter sports team turned in a commendable record, capturing one first, one sec- 
ond, and two fourth places in five meets. 

The season opened with a dual meet with Williams at Middlebury, the Blue and 
White winning by a 21-15 score. Clement of the Purple was high scorer, closely fol- 
lowed by Meacham, Springstead, and Hubbard of the home team. During the follow- 
ing week two ski teams represented Middlebury in New England carnivals. The varsity 
team traveled to Williamstown where they secured fourth place in the intercollegiate 
ski meet at the Williams carnival. The Middlebury representatives in the non-letter- 
men's meet at New Hampshire were unable to place. 

The winter sportsmen were unable to score against the stiff opposition at the Dart- 
mouth carnival but placed second to the Big Green team at the Middlebury winter 
carnival the following week. In the latter meet the Panther snowshoe team was respon- 
sible for eight of Middlebury *s ten points. For the first time in its history, the Blue 
and White ski team traveled to Canada to win fourth honors in the Ski Union tourney 
at St. Sauveur. Dartmouth won the meet with McGill and New Hampshire in second 
and third positions. Toronto, Cornell, and Norwich trailed the Panther skimen. 


OFFICERS 


ARTHUR M. BROWN 
Coach 

C. JOHN HOLMES ’36 
Captain-Elect 

WILLIAM H. CARTER ’36 
Manager-Elect 


J. REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD ’36 
Captain 

W. WYMAN SMITH ’35 
Manager 


LETTER MEN 


DONALD W. MILES ’35 
W. WYMAN SMITH ’35 
C. JOHN HOLMES ’36 
RICHARD C. HUBBARD ’36 
RALPH H. MEACHAM ’36 
JOHN C. PIERCE ’36 


I. REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD ’36 
HERBERT T. S. ELLISON ’37 
CHARLES I. HARVI ’37 
KENNETH V. JACKMAN ’37 
L. ROBERT LAWRENCE ’38 
ROBERT J. M. MATTESON ’38 



COACH BROWN HARVI 
MANAGER SMITH 


HICKS ELLISON BERRY PIERCE KENT CLARK CADY 
ROBINSON HOLMES HOPKINS SPRINGSTEAD MEACHAM HUBBARD O’CONNOR MILES 
MATTESON MACFADDEN LAWRENCE FAIR BROTHER ASSISTANT MANAGER CARTER 


I 89 


T E nr X I s 


The 1934 tennis team completed its season with a record of three victories, three 
ties, and four losses. The netmen won forty-two individual matches while losing only' 
thirty-three to their opponents but failed to break even in team matches. 

Captain Flagg played in the first position throughout the season with LaForce and 
Rudd alternating as the second and third players. Tierney, Holmes, and Brown filled 
out the team in that order. The outstanding matches of the season were two contests 
with the University of Vermont netmen, both of which resulted in 3-3 ties. In the 
first of these matches, Flagg and Rudd won their singles contests and Rudd and 
LaForce paired up for a doubles victory for the Blue and White. In the second match, 
Rudd and LaForce won in the singles and again won their doubles match to earn a tie for 
the Middmen. 


OFFICERS 


PROF. ELLSWORTH B. CORNWALL 
Coji h 

ARNOLD R. LAFORCE ’35 
Captain-Elect 

ELLIS K. HAINES ’35 
Manager-Elect 


ALLEN M. FLAGG ’34 
Captain 

WILLIAM G. MATTESON ’34 
Manager 


LETTERMEN 


ALLEN M. FLAGG ’34 
WILLIAM G. MATTESON ’34 
ARNOLD R. LAFORCE ’35 
KENNETH W. RUDD *35 


C. JOHN HOLMES ’36 
MARTIN J. TIERNEY ’36 
PHILLIP G. BROWN* *37 


SCHEDULE 

MIDDLF.BURY 7— NEW YORK STATE TEACHERS 2 

MIDDLEBURY 4— UNION 5 

MIDDLEBURY 4— BOWDOIN 3 

MIDDLEBURY 3— ST. LAWRENCE 3 

MIDDLEBURY 6— ST. MICHAEL’S o 

MIDDLEBURY 3— SPRINGFIELD 6 

MIDDLEBURY 3— VERMONT 5 

MIDDLEBURY 3— VERMONT 3 

MIDDLEBURY 4— TUFTS 5 

MIDDLEBURY 5— ST. MICHAEL’S 1 

WON 3— LOST 4— TIED 3 



CAPTAIN -ELECT LAI ORCE 



MANAGER-ELECT HAINES 


T90 




<p O L F 


Faced with a difficult schedule and handicapped by lack of practice, the 1934 golf 
team had a fairly successful season with a record of two victories in five contests. 
Captain Leete, Riccio, and Olson, lettermen from the previous season, provided the 
nucleus of the team. Lombardy and Neilson were selected from a large group of 
promising candidates and played consistently good golf throughout the season. 

The team invaded New York State for the opening trip of the year, playing three 
matches. The Middlebury men shut out Union and were defeated by Colgate and 
Hamilton. The Hamilton contest resulted in a tie with the home team winning the 
playoff. 

Traveling to Massachusetts for the final trip of the season, the Middmen played 
Holy Cross and Boston University. The strong Crusader team overwhelmed the Blue 
and White at Worcester by a 6-0 count. Against Boston University the Panthers 
made a much better showing, winning the match 4 to 2. 


OFFICERS 


BENJAMIN H. BECK 
Coach 


LAWRENCE F. LEETE '36 
Captain 


LAWRENCE F. LEETE ’3 6 KENDALL P. THOMAS ’34 

Captain-Elect Manager 

CHARLES A. KUSTER '35 
Manager-Elect 


LETTERMEN 


EVALD B. OLSON ’34 
VICTOR I. RICCIO ’34 
KENDALL P. THOMAS ’34 


FRANK LOMBARDY ’35 
LAWRENCE F. LEETE 36 
RICHARD L. NEILSON ’ 3 7 


SCHEDULE 

MIDDLEBURY 6— UNION o 
MIDDLEBURY 1— COLGATE s 
MIDDLEBURY 1 — HAMILTON 4 
MIDDLEBURY o— HOLY CROSS 6 
MIDDLEBURY 4— BOSTON UNIVERSITY 1 

WON 2 — LOST 3 



MANAGER THOMAS 1EETE 
OI. SON RICCIO PICKENS 


191 


WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 


The object of the Women’s Athletic Association is to promote and supervise the 
athletic activities of the women’s college and to stimulate interest in all forms of 
physical exercise. 

A special feature of this year’s program was the mixed doubles tennis tournament 
sponsored by the Association early in the fall. Charms were presented to the winners. 
The Association held a hockey bonfire in the spring at the conclusion of the hockey 
season. Interclass tournaments, directed by this group, were held in the fall in hockey 
and tennis; in volleyball and basketball in the winter; and in baseball, archery and bad- 
minton in the spring. In addition to the regular tournaments the Association stimulates 
interest in hiking, horseback riding, and golf by giving an allotted number of points for 
each activity. 

On October 20 a large number of members took part in "Play Day” with the women 
of the University of Vermont at Burlington. The Vermont women in turn participated 
in Middlebury’s sports meet in the early spring. 

To further interest in athletics the Association awards numerals to the members 
of championship class teams, "MC” monograms to those selected for all-Midd teams, 
and "M” sweaters to the women who have earned 1,000 points for excellence in athletics 
while in college. 


OFFICERS 


DORIS P. TUCKER ’35 
President 


RUTHANNA WILSON ’3 6 
Vice-President 


HARRIET I. SPAULDING ’37 
Secretary 

H. ELIZABETH BAKER ’36 
Custodian 


GRACE E. BATES ’35 
T reasurcr 



WILSON BAKLR SPAULDING POPPEL L1NDBLRG 
GRAY TUCKER BATES LOOMIS 


192 


II A S i: II A L I. 


The 1934 baseball season brought with it a change in grouping the participants into 
teams. Instead of the usual class groups there were three teams, each having women 
from all classes on it. These three teams chose as captains Faith Arnold ’35, Mildred L. 
Moore ’37, and Erma A. Wright ’37. 

After a series of competitive games had been played, the climax of the season came 
when the championship team was challenged by a team of the faculty men. This game 
was one of the biggest attractions of the season and the large crowd that witnessed it 
was amply amused. 

Since there were no class teams, numerals were not awarded. The best players were 
chosen from all the teams to compose the all-Midd team and these were awarded the 
"MC” insignia. 


ALL-MIDD TEAM 


FAITH ARNOLD ’35 
ELIZABETH COLEY ’35 
LOUISE H. FULTON ’35 
LOUISE E. HUTCHINSON ’36 
MARGARET E. HOPE ’37 


MILDRED L. MOORE ’37 
MURIEL A. VOTER ’37 
J. BARBARA WEAVER ’37 
ERMA A. WRIGHT ’37 


II O C k 1: Y 


This year field hockey at Middlebury received even more enthusiastic support than 
it has in preceding years. So great was its popularity that it overshadowed all the other 
fall sports. From the many competitors who turned out, four teams were chosen. 

There was keen competition for the championship with rivalry running high between 
the seniors, last year’s champions, and the juniors, who had come in a close second. 
At the last game of the season played by the junior and senior teams, the freshmen, who 
had won but one game, challenged the winning team to a game to be played at the 
hockey bonfire. The juniors, who won, accepted the challenge and the game was looked 
forward to with great anticipation. However, it was necessary to postpone the game 
and bonfire indefinitely. 

Because of the great enthusiasm shown this fall, a spring hockey season is being 
planned and it is at this time that the postponed annual bonfire will be held. 

The fall season having come to a close, an all-Midd hockey team was chosen. This 
team is made up of members of the four class teams. The girls are selected not only for 
skill and outstanding ability, but also for good sportsmanship. 


ALL-MIDD TEAM 


HELEN L. LINDBERG ’35 
DORIS P. TUCKER ’33 
IRENE E. BONNETT ’36 
RUTH G. MCNULTY ’36 
CAROL E. WHEELER *36 
RUTHANNA WILSON ’36 


CONSTANCE W. GOOCH *37 
MILDRED L. MOORE ’37 
EMILY M. BARCLAY ’38 
FLORENCE A. OVERTON *38 
KATHERINE C. WHITTIER ’38 


193 



V O L L K V It A I. I 


The women of the college showed an overwhelming endorsement of volleyball during 
the 1935 season for never before had such a great number of women participated in the 
sport. 

According to the usual plan, an intramural tournament was conducted. This sea- 
son, due to the lack of time, there was a two-round contest rather than the usual three- 
round tournament. 

The most exciting game of the season was that between the seniors and the sopho- 
mores, at the conclusion of which the sophomores became the college champions. As 
a climax to the season, the victorious sophomores challenged the winning fraternity. 
Kappa Delta Rho. 

Due to the enthusiastic welcome given to volleyball by the underclassmen, a fresh- 
man tournament was conducted between groups within the class. 

The all-Midd team was chosen from those girls on the class teams who showed the 
best sportsmanship, adhered to training rules most faithfully, and showed outstanding 
skill in playing. 


ALL-MIDD TEAM 


ANNE K. STARK ’35 
AGNES A. HARRIS ’36 
S. JEANETTE PLATT ’36 
EVELYN D. POPPEL ’36 
MARION G. GERLING ’37 


BEATRICE M. LINDGREN ’37 
BARBARA WEAVER ’37 
EMILY M. BARCLAY ’38 
LOUISE HOYT ’38 


BASKET B A I. I. 


Teams representing the four classes were entered in the 1935 women’s basketball 
tournament. Practice began directly after the mid-year examination period and the 
season closed just prior to the spring vacation. This year’s program, under the man- 
agement of Dorothy Gray ’35, consisted of a single-round tournament instead of the 
usual two-round contest. 

An unusually large number of freshman women came out for basketball this season 
and, as a consequence, three freshman teams had to be organized. The freshman A team, 
undaunted by the greater experience of upperclass teams, won the tournament and 
were awarded class numerals. "MC” monograms were also awarded to those women 
who were judged to have shown the greatest ability and sportsmanship during the 
season. 


ALL-MIDD TEAM 

ARNE L. BULKELEY ’38 MARGARET T. WHITTIER ’35 

JOYCE L. GODLEY ’38 JANET GRAY ’37 

KATHERINE C. WHITTIER ’38 MILDRED L. MOORE ’37 


1 94 


Senior Week. . . .Winter 


Carnival. . . Junior Week. 


S 


F E A 


T IT 


IK E 



i j> :* 5 . 1 1 \ i o ii w k i: k 


JOHN H. MARTIN VIRGINIA RICH 

Chairman Co-chairman 

HERBERT F. IRISH 
T rcasurcr 


PROM COMMITTEE 


WILLIAM H. FINIGAN 
Chairman 

C. JOHN HOLMES 
HENRY F. MACLEAN 


CHARLES H. STARTUP 
EVELYN COMESKEY 
KATHARINE L. KELLEY 
KATHERINE WORCESTER 


PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

HAMILTON SHEA 

Chairman 

CHARLES A. DEEDMAN 
CECIL B. GODDARD 


J. REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD 
HARMONY BUELL 
ELEANORE R. COBB 
MELBA A. SPAULDING 


PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 


BERNARD J. O’NEILL 
Chairman 

RICEIARD F. DEMPEWOLFF 
VICTOR N. SANBORN 


MARTIN J. TIERNEY 
HELEN H. ARONSON 
DORIS A. WALL 
CAROL E. WHEELER 


STUNT COMMITTEE 

M. PIERCE . CLONAN 
Chairman 

A. RICHARD CHASE 
JACK STEELE 


ARCHIBALD C. TILFORD 
JANET L. HOWE 
ELIZABETH LAWS 
PHYLLIS G. SANDERSON 


TEA DANCE COMMITTEE 


E. VIRGINIA PHILLIPS 
Chairman 

ANGUS M. BROOKS 


HARRY R. WALDRON 
H. ELIZABETH BAKER 
MARGARET R. LEACH 


195 




Seniors Smoking Pipes 
At Class Day Exercises 


I !» 3 1 S E X I O It W E E K 

T he 1934 Senior Week activities opened with Class Day Exercises held on 
the lower campus Saturday morning, June 9. The history, will, prophecy, 
and poem of the class of 1934 were read and recipients of class awards, 
departmental honors, and membership in Phi Beta Kappa were announced. 
The annual tree planting ceremony and dedication was held in front of 
Warner Science Hall. As the final event of the program the Seniors formed 
a large circle and smoked the customary clay pipes. 

Sunday morning, June 10, President Paul D. Moody delivered the Bac- 
calaureate sermon in Mead Chapel. He chose as his text John Xll:21, “Sir, 
we would see Jesus." 


Baccalaureate Service 
In Mead Memorial Chapel 




I !* :t I € O >1 .>1 E X C E >1 E X T 


I he One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Commencement of Middlebury College 
was held June 1 1, 1934 at the Congregational church where College Grad- 
uation Exercises have been held since 1804. One hundred and thirty-seven 
bachelor's degrees were awarded by President Paul D. Moody to members 
of the class of 1934. Thirteen master's degrees and six honorary degrees 
were also conferred. Dr. A. Lawrence Lowell, president-emeritus of Harvard 
University, delivered the Commencement Address, speaking on "The Prob- 
lem of the Independent College." 



S E X ion IK A L I. 

T he concluding event of the Commencement program was the annual senior 
ball held Monday evening, June 11, at the McCullough gymnasium. Bill 
Dehey and his Merrymakers furnished music for the dancing. 



i 





W I X T E IS C A II X I V A I 


l> It O <• It A >1 


THURSDAY 

7:00 p.m. Ski Movies — Gymnasium 
8:00 P.M. Fraternity Open House Dances 

FRIDAY 

2:00 p.m. Women’s Ski Meet — Chipman Hill 
3:30 p.m. Interfraternity Ski Meet — Chipman Hill 
4:00 p.m. College Ski Jumping Contest — Chipman Hill 
8:30 P.M. Carnival Ball — Gymnasium 


J. REGINALD SPRINGSTEAD ’3 6 EVELYN D. POPPEL ’36 

Co-Chairmen 



SATURDAY 


10:00 A.M. 
I I IOO A.M. 
1:30 P.M. 
3:00 P.M. 
jrOO P.M. 
8:00 P.M. 


Ski and Snowshoe Cross Country — Campus 

Snow shoe Dash — Campus 

Slalom Race — Chipman Hill 

Jumping Contest — Chipman Hill 

Tea Dance — Middlebury Inn 

Ice Carnival — Women’s Rink 


SUNDAY 

9:00 a.m. Lake Dunmore Outing 
6:00 p.m. Fraternity Initiation Banquets 


Middlebury 's second annual Winter Carnival was held 

February 15, 16 and 17. The holiday week-end sponsored by 
the Mountain Club, was directed by J. Reginald Springstead 
'36 and Evelyn D. Poppel ’36. 

Dartmouth’s winter sports team captured the intercollegiate 
meet with a total of 26 points. Middlebury placed second with 
10 points and Cornell was third with a total of 9. Repre- 
sentatives of Princeton, Yale, and Williams also competed in 
the ski and snowshoe events. 

Teams from Jackson, Mt. Holyoke, Russell Sage, and 

Wheaton participated in the women’s jubilee meet held on 
Friday afternoon. Sigma Phi Epsilon won the interfraternity 
winter sports competition held later in the afternoon. 

J. Reginald Springstead ’36, winter sports captain, won the 

college individual jumping championship. 

Sid Carsley’s orchestra provided music for the Carnival 
Ball Friday evening at the McCullough gymnasium. Philip B. 
Taft ’36 and Elizabeth B. Bailey ’35 were elected King and 

Queen of the Carnival and Beta Kappa was awarded the cup 

for winning the snow sculpture contest 

The coronation of carnival royalty was held at the Ice 

Carnival Saturday evening. An exhibition of fancy skating 
was given and prizes were awarded for the most attractive, 
original, and humorous costumes. 

A February thaw made conditions for the Carnival far 

from ideal and caused the cancellation of several events planned 
in the extensive program. All hockey games were called off 
due to poor ice conditions and the activities of the winter sports 
meet were somewhat curtailed by lack of snow. 


PHILIP B. TAFT ’36 
ELIZABETH B. BAILEY ’36 

Carnival King and Omen 



199 




i !» :i s s i; \ i o it w i: i: k 


BURTON C. HOLMES 
Chairman 


DOROTHY GRAY 
Co-chairman 


PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 


ROBERT L. STAFFORD 
Chairman 

FRANCIS H. CADY 
ANTHONY J. COSTALDO 


FRANCIS J. DONAHUE 
FRANCES M. CHAFFEE 
ELIZABF.TFI W. HIGGINS 
PATRICIA LITTLEFIELD 


SENIOR BALL COMMITTEE 


OTTO W. PROCHAZKA, JR. 
Chairman 

CARL A. GRUGGEL 
ELLIS K. HAINES 


WILLIAM A. YASINSKI 
ELIZABETH J. BRYAN 
ELIZABETH HALPIN 
HELEN L. LINDBERG 


CANE COMMITTEE 


CHARLES A. KUSTER 
Chairman 

GEORGE A. ELLIOTT 
PEMBROKE L. NIMS 


HYATT H. WAGGONER 
GRACE E. BATES 
E. DOROTHY CANFIELD 
ANNE K. STARK 


CAP AND GOWN COMMITTEE 


GERALD O. BARRETT 
Chairman 

RUDOLPH V. BONA 
DALE B. PRITCHARD 


CHARLES SHAFIROFF 
ELEANOR M. DUKE 
GRACE M. HARRIS 
SUZANNE M. TREILLET 


CLASS DAY COMMITTEE 


RAYMOND L. WHITNEY 
Chairman 

ELLIOTT H. DORGAN 
MATTHEW J. KOTOWSKI 


KENNETH W. RUDD 
ROSAMOND ALLEN 
MARIETTE R. BOWLES 
MARGARET T. WHITTIER 


VIRGINIA E. EASLER 
Chairman 


TEA COMMITTEE 

FAITH ARNOLD 
FRANCES A. LAMSON 


200 


A C k N O W L E II (. M E \ T 


The board of the 1936 KALEIDOSCOPE wishes to express sincere 
appreciation to all those who, through their cooperation, advice, and 
technical assistance, have made possible the production of this book. 
We wish especially to thank: 

Mr. Russell Knight, of the Howard-Wesson Co., whose creative 
ability and generous assistance are largely responsible for 
whatever success the 1936 KALEIDOSCOPE may achieve. 

Mr. Storrs Lee and Dean Burt Hazeltine, faculty advisors, for 
many helpful suggestions in regard to editorial and financial 
problems. 

Mr. Warren Kay Vantine and Mr. Norman Johnson, of the 
Vantine Studio, for their complete cooperation and pains- 
taking work in fulfilling photographic requirements under 
difficult conditions. 

Mr. Harry Blodgett and the entire staff of the Free Press Print- 
ing Co. for advice and careful attention to details which 
make possible high quality printing. 

Mr. Thomas Noonan, Mr. Leland Hunt, and Mr. Burton 
Holmes for their counsel. 


201 


I X II i: X O F A DYERTIS1 X ii 


P 

Addison County Trust Co. 

Alps Cafe and Sea Grill 

American Mutual Liability Insurance Co. 

Armstrong, M. J. 

Ayrshire Breeders* Ass’n 
Batchelder and Snyder Co., Inc. 

Beane, Inc., Ray 

Black Cat Cafe and Sea Grill 

Blodgett Co., The G. S. 

Cahee House Furnishing Co. 

Calvi, Joe 
Carbine’s 

Cartmell’s Garage 
Chalmers & Co., Geo. E. 

Champlain Valley Fruit Co., Inc. 

Clay Tea Room 
Cole Fur Co., Inc. 

Edwards* Men’s Shop 

Free Press Printing Co., The 

Friend, A 

Friend, A 

Friend, A 

Gee’s Shoe Shop 

Gipson Bros. 

Greene Co., Inc., W. E. 

Hall Furniture Co. 

Hayes & Carney, Inc. 

Hincks, Miss Lucia C. 

Hotel Putnam 
Hotel Vermont 
Howard, F. B. 

Howard- Wesson Co. 

Keyes & Co., E. D. 

Koutsonikolis & Alexander, Inc. 


PAGE 


Lane Press, Inc., The 215 

Louthood, H. M. 209 

McAuliffe Paper Co., Inc. 214 

Marble Savings Bank, The 217 

Maroney & Candon 217 

Marshall, M. I). 204 

Middlebury College Book Store 206 

National Bank of Middlebury 214 

Nelson Coal Co. 2 1 6 

Oakman, C. F. 208 

Opera House, The 208 

Oriental Rug Shop 212 

Otter Valley Press 212 

Postal Telegraph 2 1 2 

Preston & Son, Inc., F. J. 214 

Prouse’s Restaurants 216 

"Real New England Inns” 203 

Reynolds Co., The W. G. 207 

Rich. C. I . 219 

Rival Foods, Inc 2 1 6 

Rutland Cleaners and Dyers 212 

Rutland County National Bank 216 

Rutland Herald, The 215 

Smith Lumber Co., Inc. 213 

Spalding Bros. 2 1 1 

Standard Oil of New York 220 

Stark Restaurant 209 

Sterns & Co., Chas. 210 

Stewart & Son, John C. 218 

Stewart and Sons, Inc., John H. 220 

Ufford Co., Inc., L. H. 207 

Vantine Studio, Inc., The Warren Kay 222 
Waite & Co., Durfee 213 

Wilson Clothing Co. 21 1 


•AGE 

2 1 2 

207 

208 

218 

219 

210 

2 1 2 

209 

209 

204 

205 

2 1 8 

2 *3 

209 

220 

*17 

204 

207 

221 

218 

219 

220 

204 

220 

205 

207 

204 

204 

205 

217 

210 

22 3 

209 


202 


“On the Inn Side ” 

AT MIDDLEBURY 




ASHFIELD HOUSE 

Ashfield, Massachusetts 

DORSET INN 

Dorset, Vermont 

LONG TRAIL LODGE 

Sherburne Pass, Rutland, Vermont 
‘THE LORD JEFFERY 

Amherst, Massachusetts 

NICHEWAUG INN 

Petersham, Massachusetts 


There’s nothing like a good meal to bring 
out the Caruso in you. But the hospitality 
of the Middlebury Inn goes further than 
good food, tastefully prepared. It includes 
spotless and comfortable bedrooms and a 
friendly thoughtful service that is some- 
thing more than satisfying. Yes, sir! 

MIDDLEBURY INN, Middlebury, Vt. 

L. G. Treadway, Managing Director 

Leonard Wright, Resident Manager 

•"THE NORTHFIELD 

East Northfield, Massachusetts 

* NORWICH INN 

Norwich, Connecticut 
TOY TOWN TAVERN 

Winchendon, Massachusetts 
TRUE TEMPER INN 

Wallingford, Vermont 

* WILLIAMS INN 

Williamstown, Massachusetts 



STOP at the 
sign of the 
WATCHMAN 


Affiliated Inn s ( Same Management) 

»BOTSFORD TAVERN 

Farmington, Michigan 

* DEAR BORN INN 

Dearborn, Michigan 

‘KINGSPORT INN 

Kingsport, Tennessee 

‘ST. CLAIR INN 

St. Clair, Michigan 

‘THE NITTANY LION 

State College, Pennsylvania 
‘THE THAYER— WEST POINT 

West Point, New York 

‘Open all year 


Real New England Inns 




Where Modern Service Finds It Highest Level of Hospitality 

THE L. G. TREADWAY SERVICE CORPORATION, 247 Park Avenue, New York City 


203 


TTLaJbdoc 

vSKj^e^ 

"YOUR FOOTPRINT IN LEATHER' - 

Qee’s (§hoe (§hop 

84 Church St. Burlington, Vt. 


Hayes & Carney 

INCORPORATED 

127 Church Street 
BURLINGTON. VT. 

Every thing a fellotv 
wears 

WEEKLY SHOWINGS AT 

MIDDLEBURY FRATERNITIES 



Up-To-^Date 

Cjfurs 


Compliments of 

M. D. Marshall 


MIDDLEBURY, VT. 

Cole Fur Co., Inc. 

14 Church St. 

Burlington Vermont 


• 

Paints — Hardware 

Kitchen Utensils 



Cahee 


Place Your 

House Furnishing 


Insurance 

Company 


WITH 

• 


Miss^Lucia C. Hincks 

RUTLAND’S 

LEADING 

FURNITURE 


Agent 

She represents the Strongest 
Companies and Gives 
the Lowest Rates 

STORE 



• 


3 Court Square 

MIDDLEBURY, VT. 


204 




In Bennington, Vermont 

It’s 

Hotel 

■Putnam 

OPERATED ON BOTH 
AMERICAN & EUROPEAN 
PLANS 

Unusual Foods 

Comfortable Beds 

Pleasing Service 

GEORGE R. BUSH, 
MANAGER 


W. E. Greene Co. 

Incorporated 

128 Church Street 
BURLINGTON. YT. 

Next to Burlington' Trust Co. 

Headquarters for 

ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 

SPORTING GOODS 
BASEBALL— FOOTBALL 
BASKETBALL SUPPLIES 
TENNIS AND GOLF GOODS 

A Complete Line of the Above 
By Draper & Maynard 
The Lucky Dog Kind 

„ Other Lines Featured 

HARDWARE-PAINTS 
VARNISHES 
GLASS AND PAINTERS’ 
SUPPLIES 

FISHING TACKLE— HUNTING 
GOODS— GUNS AND RIFLES 
CLEANEBORE & REMINGTON 
SHOTGUN SHELLS AND 
CARTRIDGES 

MIDDLEBURY STUDENTS 
Make Our Store Your Headquarters 
When in Burlington 


Alumni, Student Body and Friends of Middlebury 
College— KNOW THAT 



Sold hy JOE CALVl 

WE SERVE DELICIOUS SODAS AND SUNDAES 

VERY BEST VARIETIES OF CANDY IN BULK AND IN BOXES 


20 $ 





206 


I.. II. Ufford Co. 

In^oriioralod 

Roofing Contractors 

Estimates Furnished 
from 

Plans and Specifications 

Bellows Falls, Vt. 

and 

Claremont, N. H. 


HALL FURNITURE 
CO. 

212-214 College Street 
BURLINGTON, VT. 


• • • 

Convenient Credit Terms 


Cafe anb 
&ea terill 

T he Best in Town 

Corner oi Main and Church Strllts 

BURLINGTON, VT. 


CORRECT STYLES 
FOR MEN 

• 

EDWARDS’ 
MEN’S SHOP 


The W. G. Reynolds Co. 



“Vermont’s 

Most 

Progressive 

Department 

Store” 


20 7 





FIND OUT 

NOW how 

you may 

SAVE 20% 

on your automobile insurance. 
Through the profit-sharing which 
policyholders in the American 
Mutual have enjoyed for nearly 
50 years, they have saved one- 
fifth or more on the cost for this 
protection. 

Find out how you may save 
mail the coupon . 

American Mutual 
iftr Liability Insurance 
Company 

Executive Otf.: 142 Berkeley St., Boston, Mass. 
BURLINGTON: 215 College St., Phone 2444 


American Mutual Liability Ins. Co. 

Yes, I am interested in saving 20 
per cent on my automobile insurance. 
What will it cost with you? 


Name 


Address 


City Phone 


Make and Year of Car 


My Liability Insurance Expires 


Fire and Theft Insurance Expires 
MCK— 35 


C. E. Oakman 


ELECTRICAL 
FIXTURES and 
SUPPLIES 

• 

Rutland, Vermont 



208 



LABOR SAVING 
DEVICES FOR THE 

HOME 

The Store of Today’s Best 

THE G. S. BLODGETT CO., 

INCORPORATED 

190-200 Bank Street 

BURLINGTON, VT. 


* ★ 

&tark Restaurant 

Catering to Travelling Students 

GOOD FOOD 

COURTEOUS SERVICE 

428 Main Street 

BEN X INGTON VERMONT 

Phone 332 

¥ ★ 



“ Where the Most Particular Appetite 
is Satisfied” 

BLACK CAT CAFE AND 
SEA GRILL 

160 BANK ST. 

Burlington, Vt. 

Charles B. Cn antis 

Telephone 2924 

Blue Plates 30c up 

WE SPECIALIZE IN SEA FOOD 


Geo. E. Chalmers & Co. 

INCORPORATED 

BOOKS 

STATIONERY 

KODAKS 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 
GREETING CARDS 

RUTLAND, VERMONT 



We Carry the Largest 


Telephone 2166-2167 

Assortment in Town of 



PC IRTABLE TYPEWRITERS 


Koutsonikolis & 

STATIONERY. ALL KINDS 


Alexander, Inc. 

GREETING CARDS FOR 



ALL OCCASIONS 



CANDIES •& MAGAZINES 


Wholesale and 

AS WELL AS 


Commission Dealers 

DRUGS. MEDICINES AND 


in 

T< )ILET 1 ’RE PA RATH INS 





FRUIT AND 

A 


PRODUCE 

H. M. Louthood 


71-75 Willow Street 

The Rexall Drug Store 


RUTLAND VERMONT 


209 





Compliments of 

BATCHELDER and 
SNYDER CO., Inc. 


BOSTON, MASS. 


NOTHING TAKES 
THE PLACE OF 



X T’S an established fact that Vermont peo- 
ple consider tomorrow as well as today, 
and that’s the simple answer of why this fine 
store has kept faith with its patrons. Through 
good times and bad, Sterns has held fast to its founders be- 
lief that ultimately the finer things are the least expensive. 
Now we’re ready for a bright new season . . . with the 
things you want . . . with quality merchandise. Sterns 
has never compromised with quality, and this new spring 
merchandise lives up to the letter of that rule. 

Chas. /TERM# & t o. 

The SERVICE Store 

RUTLAND VERMONT 


Quality Store 

DIAMONDS 

WATCHES 

JEWELRY 

R.C.A., VICTOR, 
SPARTAN and PHILCO 
RADIOS 

A Store Always Ready and 
Willing to Serve You 

F. B. Howard 

Incorporated 

80 MERCHANTS ROW 
RUTLAND, VT. 


I 


2 10 


Wilson Clothing Co. 

ESTABLISHED 1881 


BRAEBURN CLOTHES 
LANGROCK (to order) 
ARROW SHIRTS 

NETTLETON AND STETSON SHOES 
WARREN LUGGAGE 
McGREGOR SPORTS WEAR 


r — — 

I SPALDING BROS. 


I 

♦ 

» 

I 

I 

I 

I 


SPORTING GOODS 

College, School and Town Team Orders Solicited. 
Phone 920, or write Bob Franzoni , Sports 
Dept. Mgr., and we will be pleased 
to call at your convenience. 


RUTLAND 
FAIR HAVEN 
GLENS FALLS 


Shoes-Too 


GRANVILLE 
BALLSTON SPA 
SARANAC LAKE 


ORIENTAL RUG SHOP 

N. H. Bizdikian, Prop. 

IMPORTER OF ORIENTAL 

RUGS 

Oriental and Domestic Rugs 


RUTLAND CLEANERS 
AND DYERS 

77 Woodstock Ave. 
RUTLAND, VERMONT 

Expert Repairing 


Odorless Dry Cleaning 

Cleaning, Storing and Exchanges 



RUTLAND, VT. 


Satis faction G narantecd 

Phone 2202 



BURLINGTON, VT. 


STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES: 

Phone 390 


Steve Ward Dan Whitney 






ANSWERING 

Ray Beane, Inc. 


The Printing Require- 

Rutland, Vermont 


ments of 


Middlebury College 

GOODYEAR TIRES 


FOR 

AND 


NEARLY A CENTURY 

WILLARD BATTERIES 


OTTER VALLEY PRESS 



(Formerly the Register Co.) 

PHONE 656 


MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 




THE 


Addison County 

INTERNATIONAL 


Trust Company 

SYSTEM 


Middlebury, Vermont 

POSTAL 



TFXEGAPH 


Is 

Savings Department 

COMMERCIAL CABLES 


Commercial Department 

ALL AMERICAN CABLES 


Trust Department 

MACKAY RADIO 


Safe Deposit Boxes 

M. A. Wilcox 


Federal Deposit Insur- 
ance 

Local Manager 




Cart m ell's 
Garage 

GENERAL REPAIRING 


Compliments 

of 


Durfee Waite 

Co. 


Accessories and 
Supplies 


RADIOS 

FRIGIDAIRES 
DELCO WATER SYSTEMS 

Buick and Chevrolet 
Agency 

James R. Cartmell, Prop. 


MIDDLEBURY, VT. 


PHONE m 7 -z 



A 


HOME OF YOUR OWN 


If’s the Best Investment Known 

The Four Essential Factors in Modern Home Construction are 

I. Correct Architectural Design. 

II. Quality Materials. 

III. Sound Quality Construction Embracing Modern Built-in 


Values. 


IV. Correct Application of all Materials. 

ALL OF THEM ARE NECESSARY FOR COMPLETE SATISFACTION 
AND 100 PERCENT VALUE 

WE CAN FURNISH YOU WITH ARCHITECTURAL PLAN AND 
MODERNIZATION SERVICE AND QUALITY MATERIALS 


Smith Lumber Co., Inc 


321 WEST ST. 


RUTLAND, VT. 


The Building Department Store 



McAuliffe Paper 
Co., Inc. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Stationery - Paper - Books 
School Supplies 
Office Equipment 
Mimeographs 
Fireproof Safes 
Engraving and Printing 

PHONE 629 

BURLINGTON, VT. 


Compliments 

of 

National Bank 

of 

Middlebury 

(Over a Century 
of Service) 


GIFTS (>AUMIE 

STYLE. QUALITY & VALUE > '‘v^\\L4^ 


Tin* Keynote* of This Store is Service* 
Whether llie Purchase is I'ostly 
or Inexpensive 


DIAMONDS 



PRESTON’S 

F. J. PKESTOX & SON, INC. 


IT UPPER t III lit II STREET 
II UR LIN OTON. VERMONT 


214 





The 

Lane Press, Inc. 

Printers 

Burlington, Vermont 


The 

Rutland Herald 

ESTABLISHED 1794 

Associated Press Member 

NATIONAL, STATE AND 
LOCAL NEWS 
FICTION COMICS 

SPECIAL FEATURES 

Delivered by Mail or 
by Your Local Dealer 


E. D. KEYES & CO. 

Established 1870 

Rutland, Vermont 

COFFEE ROASTERS — TEA IMPORTERS 
Distributors of Choice Food Products 
PRINCESS ROYAL AND LILY OF THE VALLEY BRANDS 

PLEE-ZING 

Reg. U. S. Patent Office 

Cooperation 

The community of interest among the retailers, wholesalers, and manufac- 
turers in Plee-zing makes every problem of each the common problem of all, 
and facilitates its solution. 

The merchandising ability of producers, distributors and retailers coordinated 
to furnish the consumer a complete line of highest quality, under one name, 
savingly priced. 

Over 100 manufacturers guaranteeing consumer satisfaction or money back , 
no matter where sold or made. 



(Compliments 

RUTLAND 

COUNTY 

NATIONAL 

BANK 


Prouse’s 

Restaurants 

RUTLAND, VT. 

The Popular Eating Places Sen ing 
the Best Food at Moderate 
Prices 

Open Day and Night 
DEPOT RESTAURANT 

RUTLAND RAILROAD STATION 

22 Center Street 
PROUSE’S DINER 

RUTLAND FAIR GROUNDS 
Plenty of Parking Space 


Compliments of the 

Nelson Coal 
Company 

Wholesale Distributors 

of 

ANTHRACITE and 
BITUMINOUS COALS 

WEST PAWLET, VT. 


Al Downing Says: 

ONE HUNDRED 
EIGHTEEN YEARS IN 
THE GROCERY 
BUSINESS 

Branches located at 

Fitchburg and New 
Bedford, Mass, 
and Portsmouth, N. H. 

enable 

RIVAL FOODS 

INCORPORATED 

to supply New England 
Colleges with a full line of 
finest quality RIVAL brand 
grocery products at reason- 
able price. 

Rival Foods, Inc. 

38 Henry Street 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 



Clay Tea Room 

LUNCHEON - TEA - DINNER 

Special Arrangements for 

DANCING AND BRIDGE 

WE CATER TO COLLEGE STUDENT 
PARTIES 


Compliments of 

MARONEY & CANDON, 

INCORPORATED 

DRY CLEANERS 

BRANDON, VERMONT 

College Representatives 
on 

the Campus 


5j)otel Vermont 

BURLINGTON, VT. 

Featuring everything that 
is worth while in up-to- 
date hotels, and most par- 
ticularly our excellent and 
moderately priced meals. 

JOHN HARDING 
Manager 


JUST SUPPOSE 

Just suppose that four years ago you had started a Savings 
Account, and into that account you had put each week the 
extra dollar or two that was really not needed . . . the dollar 
or two that was needlessly spent. Today you would have a 
fund of 

$300 to $600 

Why not start a Savings Account Today? Four years from today will be a 
short time . . . when you are looking backward. 


The Marble Savings Bank 

RUTLAND, VERMONT 



eAuthorized 



Sales l^T 5eri'ice 

Ford Parts, Accessories, Radios 
Complete Auto Service 

TOWING — WRECKING 
ROAD SERVICE 

JOHN C. 

STEWART 

SON 

Court St., Middlebury 

TELEPHONE 28 
If No Answer Call 95-3 


Compliments 

of 


A Friend 


t 




X EQUALS A 
"KNOWN” 
QUANTITY 

at 

CARBINE’S 

AND ITS QUALITY 

There is nothing unknown 
about Clothing and Furnish- 
ings from Carbine’s, famous 
for years of strict adherence 
to high standards of quality 
in every article on sale at this 
store. The college man as 
well as every other man is 
always sure of getting his 
money’s worth. 

We In rite Yon to Inspect 
the Newest Spring Styles 


SAVE! 

Y ou can without 
skimping on the 
quantity or quality, 
by trading here 
where good food 
costs less. 

Fraternity Stewards, you must 
make your Board Department show 
a profit. 

Call Armstrong's 

2 1 9 

and we will help you make your 
plans, so you can make a profit for 
your fraternity. 

M. J. ARMSTRONG 



218 



C. F. RICH 

NEWS DEALER 

Jewelry, Silverware, Books 
Watch and Jewelry Repairing 
Cut Glass, China, Crockery 

• 

STATIONERY— PHONOGRAPHS 
BICYCLES and SUNDRIES 
RADIOS— SPORTING GOODS 
RECORDS— SHEET MUSIC 


If you are interested in 
the better things per- 
taining to country life 

you will find the Ayrshire breed of dairy 
cattle admirably adapted to your condi- 
tions. 



Ayrshire Milk is noted for its food 
content and high digestibility 

Ayrshires are heaviest producers of quality 
milk — hardy, rugged, and beautiful. Just 
the cow for farm or estate. 

For literature or help in locating founda- 
tion stock, write 

Ayrshire Breeders’ Ass’n 

731 Center Street : : Brandon, Vt. 


Compliments 

of a 


FRIEND 


219 


A 



GIPSON BROS. 

EST. 1876 

Quality 

Cconomy 

Service 

rf E 1 cry thin g-to-Bnild- A ny thing” 

Brandon Middlebury 

Vermont 


Compliments of 

A Friend 


Standard Oil of New York 

Division of 

Socony-Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. 

MOBILGAS MOKILOIL 

The Most Popular Brands of Gasoline and Motor 
Oil Sold in the United States 

For Economical, Clean Heat — We recommend 
SOCONY BURNING OIL (Kerosene) and SOCONY FUEL OILS 


Compliments of 

JOHN H. STEWART 
and SONS, Inc. 


CHAMPLAIN VALLEY 
FRUIT CO., INC. 

Fruits, Vegetables, 
Beverages 

PHONE 1 2 jo 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT 


220 






Kaleidc 


).St‘0 



The Kaleidoscope is the year book of 
Middlebury College, published by the class 

of 1936. 

The Editor, Business Manager, Staff Pho- 
tographer, Engraver, Cover Manufacturer 
and Printer did their part in making it 
a success. 

We, as Printers, are proud of our part and 
believe the 1936 Kaleidoscope is a credit to 
the class and all who participated in its 
production. 




I lie b ree Press Printing ( o. 


COMPEL 
189 College Street 


PRINTING SERVICE 


Burl moton, \ ermont 


221 




arren 



\ antine 






School and College 

O 

I ^hotograjdw 




lotoora 

O 



ier 




I03O 


Kaleidoscope 




160 BoyLston St. 


Boston, Mass. 


222 



Howard 



Wesson 


New England’s 
Largest College Annual 
Designers and Engravers 


Jr Engravers for j 
Ijl this Book J 


HOWARD-WESSON CO 

Artists and Makers of 
Fine Printing Plates 

44 Portland Street (Printers Building) 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 3-7266 


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